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Archive for March 23, 2011

Milton Levine, American entrepreneur, inventor of Uncle Milton’s Ant Farm died he was , 97..

Milton Martin Levine was an American entrepreneur who was the co-founder of Uncle Milton Toys died he was  , 97..

(November 3, 1913 – January 16, 2011) 

Biography

He was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on November 3, 1913, to Harry and Mary Levine. As a young boy, Milton collected ants in a jar at his uncle’s farm in Pennsylvania. During World War II, he served in the European Theatre where his engineer unit built bridges in France and Germany.[1] While in France, he met his future wife Mauricette Schneider, a citizen of the country, and they married in 1945. With his wife, he fathered one son and two daughters, which he eventually put through college with the proceeds from his business.[2][3]
After the war he formed a partnership with his brother-in-law E. Joseph Cossman and decided to enter the then new world of plastic and the toy industry that was predicted as a growth industry. The duo made arrangements with the National Organ Supply Company, or NOSCO who manufactured the plastic prizes in Cracker Jack to make flat toy soldiers for mail order that they advertised originally as “100 Toy Soldiers for $1″ (later $1.25) that was advertised in nearly every American comic book of the time.[4]
Levine and Cossman also successfully mass marketed the potato gun,[5] toy shrunken heads[6] to hang from car rear view mirrors and balloon animals.[7]
In 1956 while at a Fourth of July picnic at his sister’s pool, he spotted a mound of ants. This inspired him to eventually found a company, Uncle Milton’s Toys, which is best known for its division, Uncle Milton’s Ant Farm. After recalling his collection of ants as a kid, he said, “We should make an antarium.” The original ant farms were sold for $1.29 and were contained in a six by nine-inch ant farm. Business boomed after advertisements on after school programs prompted thousands of shipments a week. After the child bought the ant farm, they had to send out a request for a shipment of 25 ants, which would arrive in a vial a few weeks later. The ants contained in the farm are the species Pogonomyrmex californicus, an ant native to the southwestern United States. At the time of his death, over 20 million units were sold, with a growth rate of 30,000 a month. He once said about the success of his business in 1991: “Most novelties, if they last one season, it’s a lot. If they last two seasons, it’s a phenomenon. To last 35 years is unheard of.”[2][3]
Levine died of natural causes on January 16, 2011, in Thousand Oaks, California, at the age of 97.[2]

Books

  • Uncle Milton’s Ant Facts and Fantasies (1970)
  • How I Made $1,000,000 in Mail Order-and You Can Too! (1993)

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Milton Levine , American entrepreneur, inventor of Uncle Milton’s Ant Farm died he was , 97.

Milton Martin Levine was an American entrepreneur who was the co-founder of Uncle Milton Toys died he was , 97

(November 3, 1913 – January 16, 2011)

Biography

He was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on November 3, 1913, to Harry and Mary Levine. As a young boy, Milton collected ants in a jar at his uncle’s farm in Pennsylvania. During World War II, he served in the European Theatre where his engineer unit built bridges in France and Germany.[1] While in France, he met his future wife Mauricette Schneider, a citizen of the country, and they married in 1945. With his wife, he fathered one son and two daughters, which he eventually put through college with the proceeds from his business.[2][3]
After the war he formed a partnership with his brother-in-law E. Joseph Cossman and decided to enter the then new world of plastic and the toy industry that was predicted as a growth industry. The duo made arrangements with the National Organ Supply Company, or NOSCO who manufactured the plastic prizes in Cracker Jack to make flat toy soldiers for mail order that they advertised originally as “100 Toy Soldiers for $1″ (later $1.25) that was advertised in nearly every American comic book of the time.[4]
Levine and Cossman also successfully mass marketed the potato gun,[5] toy shrunken heads[6] to hang from car rear view mirrors and balloon animals.[7]
In 1956 while at a Fourth of July picnic at his sister’s pool, he spotted a mound of ants. This inspired him to eventually found a company, Uncle Milton’s Toys, which is best known for its division, Uncle Milton’s Ant Farm. After recalling his collection of ants as a kid, he said, “We should make an antarium.” The original ant farms were sold for $1.29 and were contained in a six by nine-inch ant farm. Business boomed after advertisements on after school programs prompted thousands of shipments a week. After the child bought the ant farm, they had to send out a request for a shipment of 25 ants, which would arrive in a vial a few weeks later. The ants contained in the farm are the species Pogonomyrmex californicus, an ant native to the southwestern United States. At the time of his death, over 20 million units were sold, with a growth rate of 30,000 a month. He once said about the success of his business in 1991: “Most novelties, if they last one season, it’s a lot. If they last two seasons, it’s a phenomenon. To last 35 years is unheard of.”[2][3]
Levine died of natural causes on January 16, 2011, in Thousand Oaks, California, at the age of 97.[2]

Books

  • Uncle Milton’s Ant Facts and Fantasies (1970)
  • How I Made $1,000,000 in Mail Order-and You Can Too! (1993)

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Steve Prestwich, British-born Australian drummer (Cold Chisel, Little River Band) and songwriter, died from a brain tumour he was , 56.

 Steven Prestwich was an English-born Australian drummer, guitarist, singer and songwriter died from a brain tumor he was , 56.. After relocating from Liverpool, Prestwich was the founding and long-term drummer for pub rockers Cold Chisel which formed in Adelaide, South Australia in 1973. He wrote the Cold Chisel’s songs, “When the War Is Over” and “Forever Now”, from the 1982 album Circus Animals. Prestwich also had a short spell with the Little River Band. Prestwich released two solo albums. Prestwich died on 16 January 2011 from a brain tumour two months before his 57th birthday.[1]

(5 March 1954 – 16 January 2011)

Biography

Steven William Prestwich was born in Liverpool, England in 1954. He was a member of the folk/rock band, Sandy, in 1970 in the United Kingdom.[2] His family relocated to Adelaide, South Australia in 1971 when he was aged 17. He was a member of Elizabeth band Ice with bassist Michael Smith and guitarist John Pryer from 1971 to 1973. In 1973, he was the founding drummer for heavy metal group Orange with the line-up of Jimmy Barnes, Ian Moss, Don Walker and Leszek Kaczmarek.[3] Orange evolved into pub rockers, Cold Chisel in 1974 and Prestwich remained a member until early 1983. During his time in Cold Chisel, Prestwich wrote “When the War Is Over” and “Forever Now”.[4] Both songs appeared on their 1982 album, Circus Animals.[5] He co-wrote with Walker the song Flame Trees from the 1984 album Twentieth Century. He briefly rejoined Cold Chisel for their Last Stand Tour from October until the group’s final show on 12 December 1983.[5] Prestwich joined the Australian group, Little River Band (1984–1986) toured the United States and released two albums with them. Little River Band recorded “When the War is Over” with John Farnham on vocals.[3] Prestwich rejoined Cold Chisel in later reformations.[2]

Prestwich released his first solo album, Since You’ve Been Gone in August 2000, which he also produced. His second album, Every Highway was released in October 2009.
Prestwich was the father of a daughter, Melody, and a son, Vaughan.[6]
On the 16th of January, Prestwich died after never regaining consciousness following brain surgery.
Cold Chisel released this update on their website:
“Cold Chisel’s drummer, Steve Prestwich, passed away Sunday afternoon. He was diagnosed with a brain tumour less than two weeks ago, underwent an operation last Friday, and never regained consciousness.
Jimmy Barnes, Ian Moss, Phil Small and Don Walker are shattered by the loss. All our thoughts are with Steve’s loved ones at this difficult time.”
On 14 March 2011, Barnes planted a flame tree in Prestwich’s memory at the National Arboretum Canberra.[7]

Discography

Albums

  • Since You’ve Been Gone (August 2000)
  • Every Highway (October 2009)

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Did you know that Five Father-Son Combos Have Been NFL Head Coaches?

Did you know that?



there have been more than 160 father-son combinations that have played in the NFL, including


Did you know that Eugene Kerik Garfield was the man who founded the Auto-Train Corporation?

a href=”https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-jYY0tXePKR4/TW7vE5pivzI/AAAAAAAArO4/3BiQaVwUKTE/s1600/Eugene+K.+Garfield%252C.jpg” imageanchor=”1″ style=”clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;”>Did you know that Eugene Kerik Garfield  was an American lawyer who founded the Auto-Train Corporatio?
Did you know that the Auto-Train became what is now known as Amtrak’s Auto Train?

Did you know that the  National Railroad Passenger Corporation, is  doing business as Amtrak (reporting mark AMTK)?

Did you knows that Amtrak was organized on May 1, 1971, to provide intercity passenger train service in the United States?

Did you know that that Eugene Garfield died from esophageal cancer?


Now if you didn’t know, now you know…

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Top 10 funny commercials

Now Thats Funny!!!!


15 people got busted on February 15, 2011

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Who is Noomi Norén?

Who is Noomi Norén? The entertainment world knows her as Noomi Rapace, she is a Swedish actress. She won Best Actress awards for her portrayal of Lisbeth Salander in the “Millennium Trilogy” of films, and was nominated in the same category at the European Film Awards.[1]
Rapace’s was born 28 December 1979 in Hudiksvall, her parents were Nina Norén, a Swedish actress, and Rogelio Durán, a Spanish cantador (Flamenco singer) from Badajoz. Rapace has said that she saw her father only occasionally before his death in 2007. At the age of five, she moved from Sweden to Flúðir, Iceland with her mother and stepfather.
At the age of seven, Rapace was given a non-speaking part in the film Í skugga hrafnsins by Hrafn Gunnlaugsson. This experience made her decide to be an actress.[2] She left home at age 15 and enrolled in a Stockholm theater school. [3] In 1996, she made her TV debut playing the part of Lucinda Gonzales in the TV series Tre kronor. From 1998 to 1999, Rapace studied at Skara Skolscen. She has been engaged at Theater Plaza 2000–2001, Orionteatern 2001, Teater Galeasen 2002, Stockholms stadsteater in 2003 as well as at the Royal Dramatic Theatre. She drew acclaim for her award-winning portrayal of a troubled teen mother in the 2007 Danish film Daisy Diamond.

Rapace is married to Swedish actor Ola Rapace. They have a son, Lev. Her sister, Særún Norén, is a photographer.[1]

 

Selected filmography

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Kenneth Grant, British occultist and writer, head of the Typhonian Order died he was , 86.

Kenneth Grant  was a British occultist, novelist, and poet, who with his partner, the artist Steffi Grant, headed the magical order previously known as the Typhonian Ordo Templi Orientis but which is now referred to as the Typhonian Order died he was , 86..

(23 May 1924 – 15 January 2011)

 Occult background

Grant’s occult experiences began in 1939 during World War II, when he claims to have received the first transmission of the “outerhuman being” S’lba. This was followed in 1943 with the reception of The Chronicles of Kralnia.[1] He met and began personal tutelage in magick under Aleister Crowley in 1944, at the age of twenty when Crowley was sixty-nine. Grant was also strongly influenced in his occult work by Austin Osman Spare.[2]

A∴A∴ and Ordo Templi Orientis

Grant met Aleister Crowley in 1944 and was initiated into the A.’.A.’. in 1946. According to occult historian P.R. Koenig, Crowley called Grant “a definite gift from the Gods”, but a careful reading of this citation shows Crowley was praising Grant’s work as a secretary. In March 1946, Crowley wrote in his diary: “Value of Grant: if I die or go to U.S.A., there must be a trained man to take care of the English O.T.O.”
After Crowley’s death, Grant’s was issued a IX° charter in O.T.O by Crowley’s successor, Karl Germer, in 1948; and received authorisation to form an O.T.O. Camp in England in 1951.[1] In 1952, he wrote a new manifesto for his group and had 5000 copies printed.
In 1954, Grant began the work of founding the New Isis Lodge. The lodge became operational in April 1955 when Grant issued a manifesto announcing his discovery of a “Sirius/Set current” upon which the lodge was to be based. Karl Germer was so displeased with this manifesto that on July 20, 1955, he issued a “Note of Expulsion” expelling Grant from O.T.O.,[1] and naming Noel Fitzgerald as the leader of the British section of the Order[3]
Grant later claimed for himself the title O.H.O. (Outer Head of the Order) of Ordo Templi Orientis, although the sole alleged documentary evidence of his appointment has since been admitted to be fake.[4]. His competing organisation was commonly called the “Typhonian” Ordo Templi Orientis, but is now officially renamed the Typhonian Order. The New Isis Lodge was absorbed into Grant’s Order in 1962.[1]
Grant died on 15 Jan 2011 after a period of illness.

Biographer of Austin Osman Spare

Grant was a great admirer and close friend of Austin Osman Spare. Together they founded the Zos Kia Cultus in 1952.[1] Over the years, Grant did much to bring his friend Spare’s name into western occult society, including the publication of Images and Oracles of Austin Osman Spare and Zos Speaks!, as well as numerous references and mentions in the Typhonian Trilogies.

Partial bibliography

The Typhonian Trilogies

Other works on the occult

  • Remembering Aleister Crowley Skoob Books, 1992. ISBN 1-871438-12-8
  • Dearest Vera Holograph letters from Austin Osman Spare to Vera Wainwright, edited by Kenneth & Steffi Grant, Fulgur Limited, 2010.
  • Hidden Lore: The Carfax Monographs by Kenneth & Steffi Grant, Fulgur Limited, 2006.
  • Borough Satyr, The Life and Art of Austin Osman Spare, (includes a contribution from Steffi Grant), Fulgur Limited, 2005.
  • Images and Oracles of Austin Osman Spare, Fulgur Limited, 2003.
  • Zos Speaks! Encounters with Austin Osman Spare, Fulgur Limited, 1998.
  • At the feet of the Guru ISBN 0954388763

Poetry

  • The Gulls Beak
  • Black to Black
  • Convolvulus

Novellas and short stories

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Harvey James, Australian musician (Sherbet), died from lung cancer he was , 58.

Harvey William James was an Australian rock guitarist died from  lung cancer he was , 58.. He was a member of the bands Mississippi, Ariel, Sherbet and The Party Boys. Born in Sheffield, England as Harvey James Harrop, he migrated with his parents to Australia in the early 1960s.[1]

(20 September 1952 – 15 January 2011)

Career

James’ first major group was the early 1970s band Mississippi, which also featured Beeb Birtles, Graham Goble Charlie Tumahai and Derek Pellicci on drums. He played on the band’s hit single ‘Will I’ after replacing Kerryn Tolhurst and was part of their appearance at Sunbury in 1974.[1]
Mississippi sailed to the UK in April 1974, working on the Sitmar Line ship Fairsky but broke up after arriving. Birtles and Goble reconstituted the band, with Pellicci, in early 1975 after their return to Australia, recruiting new members and changing the name to Little River Band.[2]
After his return to Australia, James joined progressive rock group Ariel, with Mike Rudd and Bill Putt and returned to the UK with them in 1974, where they recorded their second album Rock & Roll Scars at Abbey Road Studios. He remained with Ariel until early 1975, by which time the band had added a fifth member, singer-guitarist Glyn Mason.[3]
James shot to national prominence in Australia in early 1975, when he left Ariel to replace founding member Clive Shakespeare in the chart-topping Australian pop band Sherbet. His first recording with them was their biggest hit, “Howzat”, which became an Australian #1 and made the Top 5 in the UK Singles Chart.[4] He remained with the group until they split in 1979, but he reunited with them (alongside original guitarist Clive Shakespeare) for several Sherbet reunions. He also participated in a reunion of the second line-up of Ariel in 1998. James was an original member of The Party Boys, playing on their first two albums.

Illness and death

James was diagnosed with lung cancer in July 2010. A benefit gig, ‘Gimme That Guitar’, was organised by friends and supporters, taking place in Melbourne on 18 November 2010.[5] A second concert was planned for Sydney on 17 February 2011.
James died on 15 January 2011 aged 58.[6] Sherbet lead singer Daryl Braithwaite posted a message at his website.[7] James is survived by his wife, Fay, sons Gabriel and Joshua, and daughter Alexandra.[8]

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Romulus Linney, American playwright, father of actress Laura Linney, died from lung cancer he was , 80.

Romulus Zachariah Linney IVwas an American playwright and professor died from lung cancer he was , 80..

(September 21, 1930 – January 15, 2011)[1]

Life and career

Linney was born in Philadelphia, the son of Maitland Clabaugh (née Thompson) and Romulus Zachariah Linney III.[3] His great-grandfather was Republican Congressman Romulus Zachariah Linney.[2] Linney was raised in Boone, North Carolina and Madison, Tennessee. He was the author of three novels, thirteen plays and twenty-two short plays that have been produced in the United States, Europe and Asia.
He earned a BA from Oberlin College and an MFA from the Yale School of Drama. Linney received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as Guggenheim, Rockefeller, National Endowment for the Arts and New York Foundation for the Arts grants, an Obie award, a Yukio Mishima Prize for Fiction, and the Award for Literature, Award of Merit and Gold Medal for Drama from the American Academy and Institute for Arts and Letters. He received an honorary doctorates from Oberlin in 1994, from Appalachian State University in 1995, and from Wake Forest University in 1998. He was a member of the Ensemble Studio Theatre, the Fellowship of Southern Writers, National Theatre Conference, College of Fellows of the American Theatre, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and the Corporation of Yaddo.
Linney had been chair of the MFA Playwriting program at Columbia University’s School of the Arts and Professor of Playwriting in the Actors Studio MFA. Program at The New School in New York. An interview with Linney (both the original audio and a transcript) appears in Blackbird[4]

Death

Romulus Linney died on January 15, 2011, aged 80, from lung cancer. [5]

Family

He was the father of actress Laura Linney. An interview with Laura Linney can be found at Bombsite.

Works

  • 2: Goering at Nuremberg
  • Akhmatova
  • Ambrosio
  • Appalachia Sounding
  • April Snow
  • Ave Maria
  • Can Can
  • Captivity Of Pixie Shedman, The
  • Childe Byron
  • Choir Practice
  • Christmas Carol, A
  • Clair De Lune
  • Death Of King Philip, The
  • Democracy
  • Democracy And Esther
  • El Hermano
  • F.M.
  • Gardens Of Eden
  • Gint
  • Gold And Silver Waltz
  • Goodbye Oscar
  • Goodbye, Howard
  • Heathen Valley
  • Holy Ghosts
  • Hrosvitha
  • Juliet
  • Just Folks
  • Klonsky And Schwartz
  • Komachi
  • Lark
  • Laughing Stock
  • A Lesson Before Dying
  • Love Drunk
  • Love Suicide At Schofield Barracks, The
  • Masterbuilder Johnson
  • Mountain Memory
  • Old Man Joseph And His Family
  • Oscar Over Here
  • Over Martinis, Driving Somewhere
  • Pageant
  • Pops
  • Precious Memories
  • Sand Mountain
  • Sand Mountain Matchmaking
  • Seasons, The, Man’s Estate
  • Shotgun
  • Songs Of Love
  • Sorrows Of Frederick, The
  • Southern Comfort
  • Spain
  • Stars
  • Strindberg: Miss Julie and The Ghost Sonata
  • Tennessee
  • Three Poets
  • True Crimes
  • Two Whores
  • Unchanging Love
  • Why The Lord Come To Sand Mountain
  • Woman Without A Name, A
  • Wrath
  • Yancey
  • Yankee Doodle

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Nat Lofthouse English footballer (Bolton Wanderers, England) died he was , 85,

Nat-Lofthouse.jpegNathaniel “Nat” Lofthouse, OBE  was an English professional footballer who played for Bolton Wanderers for his whole career died he was , 85,. He was capped 33 times for the England national football team between 1950 and 1958, scoring 30 goals and giving himself one of the greatest goals-per-game ratios of any player to represent England at the highest level.

(27 August 1925 – 15 January 2011)

Playing career

Born in Bolton, Lancashire, in 1925, Lofthouse joined the town’s main club on 4 September 1939 and made his debut in a wartime 5–1 win against Bury on 22 March 1941 when he scored two goals. It was then more than five years until he made his league debut for the club, but he eventually played against Chelsea on 31 August 1946, when he scored twice in a 4–3 defeat. Lofthouse would go on to play 33 games for England, but his debut on 22 November 1950 made him 25 when he finally broke into the team. He perhaps justified a claim to an earlier call-up by scoring both goals in a 2–2 draw against Yugoslavia at Highbury on his debut.
On 25 May 1952, Lofthouse earned the title ‘Lion of Vienna‘ after scoring his second goal in England’s 3–2 victory over Austria.[2] In doing so he was elbowed in the face, tackled from behind, and finally brought down by the goalkeeper. Back from national team duty, he then scored six goals in a game between the English Football League and the Irish League on 24 September 1952.
In 1953, he was declared English Footballer of the Year. He scored a goal – but was on the losing side – in the famous 1953 FA Cup Final (aka ‘The Matthews Final’), having previously scored in each round. That season he topped the First Division goalscoring charts with 30 goals.
On 3 May 1958, almost five years to the day after losing the 1953 Final, Lofthouse captained Bolton in the 1958 FA Cup Final against Manchester United.[2] There was a national wave of sympathy for United, who three months earlier had suffered grievously in the Munich air disaster. Bolton won the game 2–0 with Lofthouse scoring both goals, the second of which was highly controversial and remains a talking point to this day.[2] Lofthouse went into a challenge with the United keeper Harry Gregg and barged him into the net to score.[2] Shoulder charging the goalkeeper was a legitimate tactic at the time, but Lofthouse later admitted that his challenge was a foul.[2]
On 26 November 1958, Lofthouse made his final England appearance, against Wales, at the age of 33, and he officially retired from the game in January 1960 because of an ankle injury, although his final league game was not until 17 December of that year, when he suffered a knee injury against Birmingham City. Lofthouse stands seventh in the list of English football’s top division goalscorers.[3]

Coaching and management

After retiring from playing football, Lofthouse became the assistant trainer at Burnden Park on 10 July 1961 and was then appointed chief coach at the club in 1967. In 1968, he spent a brief time as caretaker manager of the club and took over the job full-time on 18 December. Before becoming Bolton’s chief scout, he became an administrative manager at Burnden. In 1978, he became the club’s executive manager. In 1985, at the age of 60, Lofthouse became caretaker manager at the club again and became president in 1986.

Honours

Lofthouse was the recipient of various honours after retiring from the game. On 2 December 1989, he was made a Freeman of Bolton. On 1 January 1994, he was appointed an OBE and on 18 January 1997, Bolton decided to name their East Stand at their new Reebok Stadium after him. On 7 April 1993, he appeared as a special guest on the TV guest show This Is Your Life.[4]
Tributes were paid to Nat as he celebrated his 80th birthday, including a party at the Reebok.[5] A campaign, backed by Gordon Taylor, the chief executive of the Professional Footballers’ Association and former Bolton player, was started, aiming to get Lofthouse knighted.[6] Nat Lofthouse was an Inaugural Inductee into the English Football Hall of Fame in 2002.[7]

Personal life

Already a Bolton Wanderers player having joined them in 1939 Lofthouse was conscripted in 1943 and worked in Mosley Common colliery as a Bevin Boy.[8] He married Alma Foster in 1947 and they remained married until her death in 1985.[9] They had two children, a son, Jeff, and a daughter, Vivien.[10]

Death

Lofthouse died on 15 January 2011, aged 85, in a nursing home in Bolton.[11] On 24 January 2011 in Bolton Wanderers first home game since his death against Chelsea, a pre-match period of a minute’s silence, thunderous applause, black-and-white footage of Lofthouse in action and the laying of floral tributes by Kevin Davies and John Terry took place before the start of the match.[12] Lofthouse was buried on 26 January 2011 as thousands turned out to say goodbye at Bolton Parish Church. His funeral service was attended by more than 500 invited guests and members of the public. Eulogies were offered by Bolton chairman Phil Gartside and Professional Footballers’ Association chief executive Gordon Taylor, a boyhood Bolton fan and former Wanderers player. Current Bolton captain Kevin Davies and manager Owen Coyle were among the pallbearers.[13]

International goals

# Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
30. 22 October 1958 Wembley Stadium, London, England  Soviet Union

5 – 0

5 – 0

Friendly
29. 20 May 1956 Helsinki Olympic Stadium, Helsinki, Finland  Finland

1 – 5

1 – 5

Friendly
28. 20 May 1956 Helsinki Olympic Stadium, Helsinki, Finland  Finland

1 – 4

1 – 5

Friendly
27. 2 October 1955 Parken Stadium, Copenhagen, Denmark  Denmark

0 – 3

1 – 5

Friendly
26. 2 October 1955 Parken Stadium, Copenhagen, Denmark  Denmark

0 – 2

1 – 5

Friendly
25. 2 April 1955 Wembley Stadium, London, England  Scotland

4 – 1

7 – 2

British Home Championship
24. 2 April 1955 Wembley Stadium, London, England  Scotland

2 – 0

7 – 2

British Home Championship
23. 26 June 1954 St. Jakob Stadium, Basle, Switzerland  Uruguay

1 – 1

2 – 4

1954 FIFA World Cup quarter-final
22. 17 June 1954 St. Jakob Stadium, Basle, Switzerland  Belgium

4 – 3

4 – 4

1954 FIFA World Cup group stage
21. 17 June 1954 St. Jakob Stadium, Basle, Switzerland  Belgium

2 – 1

4 – 4

1954 FIFA World Cup group stage
20. 11 November 1953 Goodison Park, Liverpool, England  Northern Ireland

3 – 1

3 – 1

1954 FIFA World Cup qualification
19. 10 October 1953 Ninian Park, Cardiff, Wales  Wales

1 – 4

1 – 4

1954 FIFA World Cup qualification & British Home Championship
18. 10 October 1953 Ninian Park, Cardiff, Wales  Wales

1 – 3

1 – 4

1954 FIFA World Cup qualification & British Home Championship
17. 8 June 1953 Polo Grounds, New York, United States  United States

0 – 4

3 – 6

Friendly
16. 8 June 1953 Polo Grounds, New York, United States  United States

0 – 2

3 – 6

Friendly
15. 24 May 1953 Estadio Nacional de Chile, Santiago, Chile  Chile

1 – 2

1 – 2

Friendly
14. 24 November 1952 Wembley Stadium, London, England  Belgium

5 – 0

5 – 0

Friendly
13. 24 November 1952 Wembley Stadium, London, England  Belgium

2 – 0

5 – 0

Friendly
12. 12 November 1952 Wembley Stadium, London, England  Wales

5 – 2

5 – 2

British Home Championship
11. 12 November 1952 Wembley Stadium, London, England  Wales

2 – 0

5 – 2

British Home Championship
10. 4 October 1952 Windsor Park, Belfast, Northern Ireland  Northern Ireland

? – ?

2 – 2

British Home Championship
9. 28 May 1952 Hardturm, Zürich, Switzerland  Switzerland

0 – 3

0 – 3

Friendly
8. 28 May 1952 Hardturm, Zürich, Switzerland  Switzerland

0 – 2

0 – 3

Friendly
7. 25 May 1952 Ernst-Happel-Stadion, Vienna, Austria  Austria

2 – 3

2 – 3

Friendly
6. 25 May 1952 Ernst-Happel-Stadion, Vienna, Austria  Austria

0 – 1

2 – 3

Friendly
5. 28 November 1951 Wembley Stadium, London, England  Austria

2 – 1

2 – 2

Friendly
4. 14 November 1951 Villa Park, Birmingham, England  Northern Ireland

2 – 0

2 – 0

British Home Championship
3. 14 November 1951 Villa Park, Birmingham, England  Northern Ireland

1 – 0

2 – 0

British Home Championship
2. 22 November 1950 Highbury, London, England  Yugoslavia

2 – 0

2 – 2

Friendly
1. 22 November 1950 Highbury, London, England  Yugoslavia

1 – 0

2 – 2

Friendly

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Mike Vibert, Jersey politician, Minister for Education, Sport and Culture (2005–2008), died from a heart attack he was , 60.

Mike Vibert  was the Minister for Education, Sport and Culture in Jersey died from a heart attack he was , 60..

(1950 – January 15, 2011)

Biography

Mike Vibert was born in 1950 died in Jersey January 15, 2011, Jersey. He was educated at Les Landes School and Hautlieu. He then trained as a teacher at College of St Mark & St John (which was then in London). He moved from teaching to journalism, and gained a National Council for the Training of Journalists Post-graduate Certificate in Journalism (Sheffield). In Jersey, after 3 years working at the Jersey Evening Post he became one of the 4 founding members of staff of BBC Radio Jersey at its inception, becoming the first News Editor and then Assistant Editor. He provided commentary for broadcasts of States sittings. After being made redundant from BBC Radio Jersey in 1995 he became editor of Inside Jersey, a colour news magazine.
He has been past president of the Jersey Teachers Association, past vice-chairman of St Brelade’s Youth Club Management Committee, Procureur du Bien Public de la Commune de la Moye.
Elected in 1996 as Deputy for the Parish of St Brelade, No 2 district (865 votes) and re-elected 1999 (1,202 votes). During this time, he actively worked towards the creation of Les Mielles Country Park, near Beauport bay.
Elected in 2002 as Senator (in 4th place with 10,624 votes).
In the Jersey general election, 2008, held on 15 October 2008, he lost his Senatorial seat.[1]
Within the States Vibert held the office of president of Sport, Leisure and Recreation committee and while also serving as the President of the Special Committee on the Composition and Election of the States.
In early 2010 he became Vice-Chairman of the Jersey Allotment and Leisure Gardening Association becoming instrumental in establishing the very first public allotments at Les Creux in St. Brelade, his home parish.

To see more of who died in 2010 click here


Susannah York, English actress (They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?; Superman), died from bone marrow cancer she was , 72.

Susannah York  was a British film, stage and television actress. She was awarded a BAFTA as Best Supporting Actress for They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? (1969)[2] and was nominated for an Oscar and Golden Globe for the same film  died from bone marrow cancer she was , 72.. She won best actress for Images at the 1972 Cannes Film Festival. In 1991 she was appointed an Officier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres.[2] Her appearances in various hit films of the 1960s formed the basis of her international reputation,[3] and an obituary in The Telegraph characterised her as “the blue-eyed English rose with the china-white skin and cupid lips who epitomised the sensuality of the swinging Sixties“.[4]

(9 January 1939 – 15 January 2011)

Early life

York was born Susannah Yolande Fletcher in Chelsea, London in 1939, the younger daughter of Simon William Peel Vickers Fletcher (1910–2002), a merchant banker and steel magnate, and his first wife, the former Joan Nita Mary Bowring – they married in 1935 and divorced prior to 1943.[5][6][7][8][9][10] Her maternal grandfather was Walter Andrew Bowring, CBE, a British diplomat who served as Administrator of Dominica (1933–1935); she was a great-great-granddaughter of political economist Sir John Bowring.[4][6][11][12][13] York had an elder sister, as well as a half-brother, Eugene Xavier Charles William Peel Fletcher, from her father’s second marriage to Pauline de Bearnez de Morton de La Chapelle.[5][14][15][16][17]
In early 1943, her mother married a Scottish businessman, Adam M. Hamilton, and moved, with her daughter, to Scotland.[18][19] At the age of 11 York entered Marr College in Troon, Ayrshire.[4][20] Later she became a boarder at Wispers School, a school housed in Wispers, a Norman Shaw-designed country house in the Sussex village of Stedham. Still aged 13 she was removed – effectively expelled – from Wispers after owning up to a naked midnight swim in the school pool, and she transferred to East Haddon Hall in Northamptonshire.[4][20]
Enthused by her experiences of acting at school (she had played an Ugly Sister in Cinderella at the age of nine), York first decided to apply to the Glasgow College of Dramatic Art; but after her mother had separated from her stepfather and moved to London, she instead auditioned for RADA.[2][4][20][21] There she won the Ronson award for most promising student[22] before graduating in 1958.[23]

Career

Film

Her film career began with Tunes of Glory (1960), co-starring with Alec Guinness and John Mills. In 1961, she played the leading role in The Greengage Summer, which co-starred Kenneth More and Danielle Darrieux. In 1962, she performed in Freud: The Secret Passion with Montgomery Clift in the title role.
York played Sophie Western opposite Albert Finney in the Oscar winning Best Film Tom Jones (1963) and also appeared in A Man for All Seasons (1966), The Killing of Sister George (1968) and Battle of Britain (1969). She co-starred with George C. Scott (as Edward Rochester) playing the title role in an American television movie of Jane Eyre (1970).
York was nominated for a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? (1969). She famously snubbed the Academy when, regarding her nomination, she declared it offended her to be nominated without being asked. She did attend the ceremony but lost to Goldie Hawn for her role in Cactus Flower.[24]
In 1972, she won the Best Actress award at the Cannes Film Festival for her role in Images.[25] She played Superman‘s mother Lara on the doomed planet Krypton in Superman (1978) and its sequels, Superman II (1980) and Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1987). York made extensive appearances in British television series, including Prince Regent (1979), as Maria Fitzherbert, the clandestine wife of the future George IV, and We’ll Meet Again (1982).
In 1984, York starred as Mrs. Cratchit in A Christmas Carol (1984), based on the novel by Charles Dickens. She again co-starred with George C. Scott (as Ebenezer Scrooge), David Warner (Bob Cratchit), Frank Finlay (Jacob Marley), Angela Pleasence (The Ghost of Christmas Past) and Anthony Walters (Tiny Tim Cratchit).
In 2003, York had a recurring role as hospital manager Helen Grant in the BBC1 television drama series Holby City. She reprised this role in two episodes of Holby City’s sister series Casualty in May 2004. Her last film was The Calling, released in 2010 in the UK.

Stage

In 1978, York appeared on stage at the New End Theatre in London in The Singular Life of Albert Nobbs with Lucinda Childs, directed by French director Simone Benmussa. The following year, she appeared in Paris, speaking French in a play by Henry James: Appearances, with Sami Frey. The play was again directed by Benmussa.
In the 1980s, again with Benmussa, York played in For no good Reason, an adaptation of George Moore‘s short story, with Susan Hampshire. In 2007, she appeared in the UK tour of The Wings of the Dove, and continued performing her internationally well received solo show, The Loves of Shakespeare’s Women. Also in 2007, she guest starred in the Doctor Who audio play Valhalla. In 2008, she played the part of Nelly in an adaptation by April De Angelis of Wuthering Heights.[citation needed]
According to the website of Italian symphonic metal band Rhapsody of Fire (previously known as Rhapsody), York had been recruited for a narrated part on the band’s next full-length album Triumph or Agony. In 2009, she starred alongside Jos Vantyler in The Tennessee Williams Triple Bill at The New End Theatre, London for which she received critical acclaim.[26]
York’s last stage performance was as Jean in Ronald Harwood‘s Quartet, at the Oxford Playhouse in August 2010.[27] She demonstrated her undoubted Star Quality when she appeared in a 1985 production of the play of the same name, the last ever written by Sir Noel Coward.

Writing and personal appearances

In the 1970s, she wrote two children’s fantasy novels, In Search of Unicorns (1973), revised (1984) which was excerpted in the film Images, and Lark’s Castle (1976, revised 1986).[28]
She was a guest, along with David Puttnam on the BBC Radio 4 documentary I Had The Misery Thursday, a tribute programme to film actor Montgomery Clift, which was aired in 1986, on the twentieth anniversary of Clift’s death. York co-starred with him in Freud, John Huston‘s 1962 film biography of the psychoanalyst.[28]

Personal life

In 1960, York married Michael Wells, with whom she had two children, daughter Sasha (born May 1972) and son Orlando (born June 1973). They divorced in 1976. In the 1984 TV adaptation of A Christmas Carol, she played Mrs. Cratchit and both of her children co-starred as Cratchit offspring. Orlando gave York her first grandchild, Rafferty, in 2007.[29]
Politically, she was left-wing and publicly supported Mordechai Vanunu, the Israeli dissident who revealed Israel’s nuclear weapons programme.[30] While performing The Loves of Shakespeare’s Women at the Cameri Theatre in Tel Aviv in June 2007, York dedicated the performance to Vanunu, evoking both cheers and jeers from the audience.[31]
York died at the Royal Marsden Hospital in London[32] from advanced bone marrow cancer on 15 January 2011, six days after her 72nd birthday.[33][34]

Filmography

Year Film Role Notes
1960 There Was a Crooked Man Ellen
Tunes of Glory Morag Sinclair
1961 The Greengage Summer Joss Grey
1962 Freud: The Secret Passion Cecily Koertner
1963 Tom Jones Sophie Western
1964 The 7th Dawn Candace Trumpey
Scene Nun, Take One The Actress
1965 Sands of the Kalahari Grace Munkton
Scruggs Susan
1966 The Fall of the House of Usher (TV) Madeleine Usher
Kaleidoscope Angel McGinnis
A Man for All Seasons Margaret More
1968 Sebastian Rebecca Howard
Duffy Segolene
The Killing of Sister George Alice ‘Childie’ McNaught
1969 Oh! What a Lovely War Eleanor
Battle of Britain Section Officer Maggie Harvey
Lock Up Your Daughters Hilaret
They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? Alice Nominated — Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress
1970 Jane Eyre Jane Eyre
Country Dance Hilary Dow
1971 Happy Birthday, Wanda June Penelope Ryan
1972 Zee and Co. Stella
Images Cathryn Best Actress Award (Cannes Film Festival)
1974 Gold Terry Steyner
The Maids Claire
1975 Conduct Unbecoming Mrs. Marjorie Scarlett
That Lucky Touch Julia Richardson
1976 Sky Riders Ellen Bracken
Eliza Fraser Eliza Fraser
1978 The Shout Rachel Fielding
The Silent Partner Julie Carver
Superman Lara
1979 Prince Regent (TV miniseries) Mrs. Fitzherbert
The Golden Gate Murders (TV) Sister Benecia
1980 Long Shot An Actress
The Awakening Jane Turner
Superman II Lara
Loophole Dinah Booker
Late Flowering Love
Falling in Love Again Sue Lewis
1981 Second Chance (TV series) Kate Hurst
1982 We’ll Meet Again (TV series) Helen Dereham
Alicja Queenie
1983 Yellowbeard Lady Churchill
Nelly’s Version (TV) Narrator (voice)
1984 A Christmas Carol (TV) Mrs. Cratchit
1985 Star Quality (TV) Lorraine Barry
Daemon (TV)
Tomorrow’s a Killer, aka Prettykill Toni
1987 Superman IV: The Quest for Peace Lara (voice)
Mio min Mio Seamstress
Barbablú, Barbablú
1988 A Summer Story Mrs. Narracombe
Just Ask for Diamond Lauren Bacardi
1989 Melancholia Catherine Lanham Franck
After the War (TV miniseries) Irene Jameson
Quattro piccole donne (TV)
En Håndfull tid Susanne Walker
1990 The Man from the PVU (TV) Amy Wallace
Fate
1991 Devices and Desires (TV miniseries) Meg Dennison
Trainer (TV series) Rachel Ware
1992 Illusions (TV) Dr. Sinclair
1993 Piccolo grande amore Queen Christina
1997 Loop Olivia
Dark Blue Perfume (TV) Liz
1998 So This Is Romance? Mike’s Mum
2000 St. Patrick: The Irish Legend (TV) Concessa
Jean Jean
2002 The Book of Eve
2003 Visitors Carolyn Perry
2004 Love Is a Survivor Present Day Roma
2006 The Gigolos Tessa
2007 Maude Maude
2008 Franklyn Margaret
2010 The Calling The prioress

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