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Archive for July 10, 2011

Lindsey Durlacher, American Greco-Roman wrestler died he was , 36

Lindsey Durlacher was an American Greco-Roman wrestler whose career highlight was a bronze medal at the 2006 FILA Wrestling World Championships  died he was , 36. He died at the age of 36 in his sleep on June 4, 2011, at his home in Denver, Colorado.


(September 14, 1974  – June 4, 2011)

Durlacher had surgery three days earlier. He was a graduate of Buffalo Grove High School in Buffalo Grove, IL where he still coached and mentored students.

 

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Lawrence Eagleburger, American diplomat and politician, Secretary of State (1992–1993) died he was , 80

Lawrence Sidney Eagleburger was an American statesman and former career diplomat, who served briefly as the United States Secretary of State under President George H. W. Bush died he was , 80. Previously, he had served in lesser capacities under Presidents Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, and George H. W. Bush. Eagleburger is the only career Foreign Service Officer to have served as the United States Secretary of State.


(August 1, 1930 – June 4, 2011)

Education and personal life

Eagleburger was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the son of Helen (née Van Ornum), an elementary school teacher, and Leon Sidney Eagleburger, a physician.[4] He graduated from P J Jacobs High School in Stevens Point, Wisconsin, then attended Stevens Point State College (now the University of Wisconsin–Stevens Point), before earning his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. During his time at Wisconsin, he joined Alpha Sigma Phi Fraternity. On May 6, 1995, he delivered the commencement address to the 1995 graduating class of James Madison University.[5]
He was formerly a member of the Board of Visitors at the College of William and Mary.
Eagleburger also served in the United States Army (1952–1954), attaining the rank of First Lieutenant.
He had three sons, all of whom are named Lawrence Eagleburger, though they have different middle names.[1] The eldest is from his first marriage, which ended in divorce. The other two are from his second marriage, which was to Marlene Heinemann from 1966 until her death in 2010.[6]

Governmental career

In 1957, Eagleburger joined the United States Foreign Service, and served in various posts in embassies, consulates, and the Department of State. From 1961 to 1965 he served as a staffer at the U.S. Embassy in Belgrade, Yugoslavia.
Starting in 1969, he served in the Nixon administration as an assistant to National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger. He stayed in this appointment until 1971; thereafter he took on several positions, including advisor to the U.S. Mission to North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) in Brussels, and, following Kissinger’s appointment as Secretary of State, a number of additional posts in the State Department.
Following Nixon’s resignation, he briefly left government service, but was soon appointed as ambassador to Yugoslavia by President Jimmy Carter, a post he held from 1977 to 1980.
In 1982, Reagan appointed him as Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs (the State Department’s third-ranking position), a position he held for several years. In 1989, President George H. W. Bush appointed him Deputy Secretary of State (the Department’s second-ranking position); he also served as the President’s primary advisor for affairs relating to the quickly disintegrating Yugoslavia. On August 23, 1992, James A. Baker resigned as Secretary of State (to head up Bush’s unsuccessful re-election campaign), and Eagleburger served as Acting Secretary of State until Bush gave him a recess appointment for the remainder of the Bush administration.
His period as advisor for Yugoslavian affairs from 1989 to 1992 was highly controversial. He gained a reputation for being a strong Serbian partisan, most controversially denying that Serbian paramilitaries and the Yugoslav National Army had committed atrocities in the breakaway republic of Croatia. This perceived partisanship led the European press to dub him Lawrence of Serbia[7] (a reference to Lawrence of Arabia).
In 1991, President Bush awarded him the Presidential Citizens Medal. He was a member of the board of directors of the International Republican Institute.[8]

International Commission on Holocaust-Era Insurance Claims

Eagleburger became chairman of the International Commission on Holocaust Era Insurance Claims, or ICHEIC, which was set up in 1998. The purpose of the Commission was to resolve unpaid Nazi-era insurance claims for survivors of the Holocaust. In 2005, Eagleburger announced that the ICHEIC was offering approximately 16 million dollars to Holocaust victims and their heirs, noting as he did so the research ability of the ICHEIC staff which allowed them to evaluate claims from companies which no longer existed.[9][clarification needed] In the years prior to this there had been some controversy about the Commission, including reports that it was over-budgeted and too slow, and that insurance companies which had previously agreed to work with the ICHEIC had failed to disclose policyholder lists.[10] Eagleburger responded to these accusations by saying, among other things, that it was difficult to work quickly when many of the claimants lacked basic information such as the name of the insurance company involved.[11]

Stance on Middle Eastern conflict

After serving in the Foreign Service for 27 years, Eagleburger retained an interest in foreign policy and was a familiar figure on current events talk shows. He caused some discussion with public comments about President George W. Bush’s foreign policy. In August 2002, Eagleburger questioned the timing of possible military action in Iraq, saying, “I am not at all convinced now that this is something we have to do this very moment.”[12] He did indicate he believed that Iraqi regime change could be a legitimate U.S. endeavor at some point, but that at that time he did not believe the administration was fully prepared for such a conflict.[13] In April 2003, following warnings by the Bush administration to the government of Syria, Eagleburger condemned the possibility of military action in Syria or Iran, saying that public opinion would not support such a move and that “If President Bush were to try it now, even I would feel he should be skinned alive.”[14]
On January 5, 2006, he participated in a meeting at the White House of former Secretaries of Defense and State to discuss United States foreign policy with Bush administration officials. On November 10, 2006 it was announced that he would replace Secretary of Defense designate Robert Gates in the Iraq Study Group.[15]
After the election of Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, Eagleburger seemed to think that Iran was moving in a direction which may at some point call for military action, saying in an interview that while “we should try everything else we can first,” at some point it would probably be necessary to use force to ensure that Iran did not obtain or use nuclear weapons.[16]
He was Chairman of the Board of Trustees for The Forum for International Policy, and a member of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy (WINEP) Board of Advisors.

2008 Presidential election

Before Republican primaries, Eagleburger endorsed John McCain for President.[17] In an NPR interview on October 30, 2008, he described McCain’s running-mate Sarah Palin as “not prepared” for top office. He also stated that many Vice Presidents have not been ready.[18] The next day, in an interview on Fox News, he retracted his comments about Palin.[19]
On October 30, 2008, on the Fox News Channel, Eagleburger referred to Democratic presidential nominee Barack Obama as a “charlatan“, citing his fundraising methods and other aspects of his presidential campaign.[20]

Death

Eagleburger died of pneumonia at the University of Virginia Medical Center in Charlottesville, Virginia.[21] He was 80 and had lived outside Charlottesville since 1990. He is survived by his three sons.[6]

 

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11 people got busted on June, 05, 2011

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Donald Hewlett, English actor died he was , 90.

Donald Marland Hewlett was an English actor, born in Northenden, Manchester, and best known for his sitcom roles al Colonel Charles Reynolds in It Ain’t Half Hot Mum and Lord Meldrum in You Rang, M’Lord?, both written by Jimmy Perry and David Croft died he was , 90. He also had a number of parts in British film and television productions.


(30 August 1920 – 4 June 2011)

Early life

Hewlett was born into a wealthy family, his father Thomas Hewlett owned the Anchor Chemical Company which is based in Clayton, Manchester and is now a subsidiary of Air Products.
Hewlett was educated at Clifton College followed by St John’s College, Cambridge where he was part of the Footlights Revue.[5] During World War II he served in the Royal Navy as a meteorologist[3] and was stationed for several years in Kirkwall in the Orkney Islands where he was a founder member of the Kirkwall Arts Club.[6][7] He was later posted to Singapore.[5]

Career

Following his demobilization, Hewlett trained at RADA and gained his first professional acting job in repertory theatre at the Oxford Playhouse where he worked alongside Ronnie Barker.[5] His first television acting role was the part of Lincoln Green in 1954’s Orders are Orders.
His television appearances included The Ronnie Corbett Show, The Ronnie Barker Playhouse, The Saint, The Avengers, The Dick Emery Show and the 1971 Doctor Who story The Claws of Axos. However, he gained his most prominent role in the Croft and Perry sitcom It Ain’t Half Hot Mum (1974–81) as Colonel Charles Reynolds. He was reunited with fellow actor Michael Knowles in another David Croft sitcom, the sci-fi spoof Come Back Mrs. Noah (1977–78), and later with the successful You Rang, M’Lord? (1988–93) as Lord George Meldrum. Other roles included ‘Winkworth’ in Morris Minor’s Marvellous Motors in 1989 and The Adventures of Brigadier Wellington-Bull. His last TV appearance was in The Upper Hand in 1995.[8]
Hewlett made a number of film appearances including Spike Milligan‘s Adolf Hitler – My Part in His Downfall, A Touch of Class, Carry On Behind and The First Great Train Robbery.[8]
Hewlett’s previous marriages, to Christine Pollon and Diana Greenwood, ended in divorce.[1] He had two sons and a daughter by Greenwood.[1] Having previously lived for several years in Whitstable, Kent, he lived in Fulham, SW London,[citation needed] with his third wife Therese McMurray-Hewlett, by whom he had a son and daughter.[citation needed] He died from pneumonia, aged 90.[citation needed] He is survived by his wife and his five children.[1]
His daughter, Siobhan Hewlett, is an actress, best known for her role in Irina Palm.

Selected television roles

Year
Title
Role
1959
Captain Sooty Pikington
1974–1981
Lieutenant-Colonel Charles Reynolds
1977–1978
Carstairs
1988–1993
George, Lord Meldrum

Filmography

 

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Martin Rushent, English record producer (Buzzcocks, Human League, The Stranglers) died he was , 63

Martin Rushent  was an English record producer, best known for his work with The Human League, The Stranglers and The Buzzcocks died he was , 63.


(11 July 1948 – 4 June 2011)

Early life

Rushent was born on 11 July 1948 in Enfield, Middlesex. His father was a car salesman. Rushent attended Minchenden Grammar School in Southgate, Middlesex.[1]

Career

Early career

Rushent’s first experience in a recording studio was at EMI House in London’s Manchester Square, when his school band (of which he was the lead singer) had the opportunity to record a demo.[5] After leaving school, Rushent, who had already experimented with his father’s 4-track recorder, worked at a chemical factory before working for his father while applying for studio jobs. After numerous rejections, Rushent was employed by Advision Studios as a 35mm film projectionist. After approximately 3 months, Rushent began working in the audio department as a tape operator alongside Tony Visconti. He worked on sessions for Fleetwood Mac,[6] T-Rex, Yes, Emerson, Lake and Palmer, Petula Clark, Jerry Lee Lewis and Osibisa.[7] Rushent stated that while at Advision, Jerry Lee Lewis threw a tantrum as Yes had been booked into the studio when he was not ready to leave, and chased the studio staff around the complex until they locked themselves in a different studio.[8]
Rushent progressed to senior assistant engineer, staff engineer, and eventually head engineer. He then began working freelance, where he built his reputation and was employed by United Artists (UA).[5] While with UA, Rushent recorded sessions alongside Martin Davies, recording artists such as Shirley Bassey and The Buzzcocks, as well as convincing the company to sign The Stranglers provided that he produced the band’s material. Rushent produced the group’s Rattus Norvegicus, No More Heroes and Black and White albums and recorded demos for Joy Division, before tiring of his commute to London and leaving UA at the end of the 1970s.[1][5]

Synthpop

Rushent expressed a desire to move away from guitar bands, and bought a LinnDrum,[8] Roland MC-4 Microcomposer and Jupiter-8 synthesiser to learn sequencing and synthesis techniques.[5] Rushent set up his own studio, Genetic, with Synclavier and Fairlight CMI synthesisers[5] and an MCI console.[7] He spent £35,000 on air conditioning alone, and had a Mitsubishi Electric digital recorder costing £75,000.[5] Rushent used his Roland equipment to record Pete Shelley‘s first solo album, Homosapien. Originally aimed to be a collection of demos, the recordings were signed to Island Records. They were heard by Simon Draper of Virgin Records, who asked Rushent to produce The Human League. Rushent’s work on the group’s 1981 album Dare earned him a BRIT Award in 1982 for Best British producer.[9] Rushent’s production on Dare frustrated the group’s guitarist Jo Callis, as the only guitar on the album was used to trigger a gate on the synthesiser. Singer Susanne Sulley was also frustrated by the lengthy process of Rushent’s synth programming. Rushent walked out of his own studio and never worked with the band again after Sulley made an off-the-cuff comment toward him.[5] After the Human League, Rushent worked with XTC, Generation X, Altered Images and The Go-Go’s.[10]
Rushent decided to take a break from production in 1984,[11] and sold his assets – including Genetic Studios. He briefly took up a consultancy position with Virgin, but retired from the industry to raise his children.[5]

Later career

Rushent returned to the music industry in the mid 1990s when he established Gush, a dance club on Greenham Common. The club’s opening night was headlined by The Prodigy.[5] Rushent soon began redeveloping his interest in recording, and decided to catch up on the technological advances he had missed.[5]
Rushent built a home studio around a Mackie console, Alesis ADAT HD24 recorder and Cubase 5,[7] with which he produced music by The Pipettes,[9] Does It Offend You, Yeah?[8] and Killa Kela.[12] In 2005, he produced Hazel O’Connor‘s album Hidden Heart.[5] The following year, he was involved with the BBC Electric Proms when he recorded Enid Blitz at a 15th-century manor house in Brentford, using a BBC truck as the control room.[7]
In 2007, Rushent produced the recording Cherry Vanilla by The (Fabulous) Cult of John Harley. The recording was used by the American singer and actress Cherry Vanilla in the launch of her autobiography Lick Me: How I Became Cherry Vanilla.[13]
At the time of his death, Rushent was working on a 30th anniversary version of Dare, remixed like Love and Dancing but using musical instruments instead of synthesisers.[5][7]

Personal life

In 1972, Rushent married Linda Trodd, with whom he had three children – sons James and Tim and daughter Joanne.[1] They separated in the 1980s, and Rushent later married Ceri Davis, with whom he had a daughter named Amy.[1] Rushent lived with Ceri and Amy in the Berkshire village of Upper Basildon.[1][14] Rushent’s son James is the lead singer for the dance punk band Does It Offend You, Yeah?.[3] Rushent died on 4 June 2011.[3]

Discography

This list of songs or music-related items is incomplete; you can help by expanding it.
Year
Artist
Record
Type
Role
Reference
1970
Studio album
Engineer
1971
Studio album
Engineer
Studio album
Engineer
Studio album
Engineer, producer
Teenage Licks
Studio album
Engineer
Studio album
Engineer
1972
Studio album
Engineer
Studio album
Engineer
Studio album
Engineer
Ontinuous Performance
Studio album
Engineer
Studio album
Engineer
1973
Studio album
Producer
Chaos
Down At The Club/You Could Be My Girl
Studio single
Composer & Producer
All to Bring You Morning
Studio album
Engineer, remixing
One Live Badger
Live album
Engineer
1974
Original Man
Studio album
Engineer
Studio album
Engineer
Studio album
Engineer
The World Became the World
Studio album
Engineer
1975
Studio album
Producer
Studio album
Engineer
Studio album
Engineer
Panic
Studio album
Engineer
1976
New Nation
Studio album
Engineer
Too Young to Feel This Old
Studio album
Engineer
1977
Studio album
Producer
Studio album
Producer
Téléphone
Studio album
Producer
1978
Studio album
Producer
Studio album
Producer
Studio album
Producer
Studio album
Producer
Studio album
Producer
Gomm with the Wind
Studio album
Producer
Studio album
Producer
Summer Holiday
Studio album
Producer
1979
Live album
Producer
Studio album
Producer
Studio album
Producer
Studio album
Producer
1980
Studio album
Producer
Studio album
Producer
1981
Studio album
Producer
Studio album
Producer
Studio album
Producer
Studio album
Engineer, producer
Before Your Very Eyes
Studio album
Engineer, producer
Studio album
Mixing
1982
Remix album
Producer
Studio album
Producer
Studio album
Producer
1983
Studio album
Producer
Studio album
Producer
1984
Studio album
Programming
Smile
Studio album
Producer
Studio album
Engineer, producer
1985
Studio album
Producer
1988
Studio album
Producer
Heart of Glass
Single
Producer
1997
Come On
Single
Producer
1990
Single
Producer
2005
Hidden Heart
Studio album
Producer
Under the Influence
Studio album
Producer
2009
Amplified
Studio Album
Producer
2010
Studio album
Producer
2011
Studio album
Producer

 

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Did you know that Arness has the distinction of having played the role of Marshal Matt Dillon in five separate decades: 1955 to 1975?

Did you know that James Arness was an American actor, best known for portraying Marshal Matt Dillon?

Did you know that Arness played in the television series Gunsmoke for 20 years?
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Did you know that  Arness has the distinction of having played the role of Marshal Matt Dillon in five separate decades: 1955 to 1975?

James Arness, American actor (Gunsmoke), died from natural causes on June 3, 2011  he was , 88?

Now if you didn’t know, now you know…
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Wally Boag, American performer (Disneyland’s Golden Horseshoe Revue) died he was , 90.

Wallace Vincent “Wally” Boag was an American performer known for his starring role in Disney‘s long running stage show the Golden Horseshoe Revue died he was , 90.

(September 13, 1920 – June 3, 2011)

An early publicity poster of Wally Boag’s pre-Disney days.

Biography

Boag was born in Portland, Oregon, in 1920 to Wallace B. and Evelyn G. Boag. He joined a professional dance team at age nine, later established his own dance school, and by the age of 19 had turned to comedy. He toured the world’s stages in hotels, theaters and nightclubs. While appearing at the London Hippodrome in Starlight Roof, he brought a young 12-year-old girl on stage to help with his balloon act. The girl, a young Julie Andrews, astonished the audience with her voice and was kept in the show. In 1945, Boag signed a contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and appeared in films such as Without Love and Thrill of a Romance, in uncredited roles.[citation needed]
In the early 1950s, while appearing in revues in Australia, he met tenor Donald Novis. It was Novis who got Walt Disney to audition Boag for the Golden Horseshoe Revue, a 45-minute stage show which was written by its first pianist Charles LaVere and lyricist Tom Adair. Novis was the show’s first tenor and was replaced by Fulton Burley when he retired in 1962. Both Boag and The Golden Horseshoe Revue were cited in The Guinness Book of World Records for having the greatest number of performances of any theatrical presentation. The show was often incorrectly introduced before a performance as the record holder of the longest running revue in the history of show business. The 10,000th performance of the Golden Horseshoe Revue was featured on NBC‘s The Wonderful World of Disney.[citation needed]
Boag’s Pecos Bill/Traveling Salesman character was a fast-paced comedy routine featuring slapstick humor, squirt guns, a seemingly endless supply of broken teeth which he would spit out throughout the routine, and his signature balloon animals (Boagaloons).
In 1963, Julie Andrews once again performed with Boag on the Golden Horseshoe stage along with the Dapper Dans, at a special press-only event to promote the following year’s release of Mary Poppins. Together, Andrews and Boag recreated their act of long ago and sang “By the Light of the Silvery Moon.”
While Walt Disney was alive, he did everything he could to further Boag’s career. Boag voiced Jose in “Walt Disney’s Enchanted Tiki Room” and also wrote much of the script for the attraction, participating also in the development of “Haunted Mansion” in Disneyland.
Disney had small roles written for Boag in The Absent-Minded Professor and Son of Flubber. It was Disney’s intention to use Boag as the voice of Tigger in Winnie the Pooh, but Disney died in 1966 and the role ultimately went to Paul Winchell.

In 1971, Boag took his Pecos Bill character to the newly-opened Walt Disney World and re-crafted the saloon show into a faster, funnier Diamond Horseshoe Revue. Three years later he returned to Disneyland and finished his career there, entertaining adoring crowds at the Golden Horseshoe, retiring in 1982. (He had in the meantime performed his act as the human guest on the fifth season of The Muppet Show.) The Golden Horseshoe Revue closed in 1986. In 1995, Boag was inducted into the ranks of the Disney Legends and has his own window on Main Street in Disneyland above the Carnation Company. The inscription reads “Theatrical Agency – Golden Vaudeville Routines – Wally Boag, Prop.”
Boag’s performances have influenced many later performers and comedians, most notable of whom is Steve Martin, who studied Boag’s humor and timing while working at Disneyland as a teenager. Boag’s performance appears on Week One of the Mickey Mouse Club DVD collection, and the soundtrack of the Golden Horseshoe Revue has been released on CD.
Boag lived in California with his wife, Ellen Morgan Boag. His autobiography, entitled “Wally Boag, Clown Prince of Disneyland,” was published in August 2009 and is available for purchase at wallyboag.com.[3] On June 3, 2011, it was announced by Steve Martin on Twitter “My hero, the first comedian I ever saw live, my influence, a man to whom I aspired, has passed on. Wally Boag.”[4][5] The following day, June 4, 2011, Boag’s long time partner at the Golden Horseshoe Revue, Betty Taylor, died.[6]

Filmography

 

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Andrew Gold, American singer-songwriter (“Lonely Boy”, “Thank You for Being a Friend”), died from a heart attack he was , 59

Andrew Maurice Gold  was an American singer, musician and songwriter died from a heart attack he was , 59. His works include the Top 10 singleLonely Boy” (1977), as well as the singles “Thank You for Being a Friend” (1978), and “Never Let Her Slip Away” (1978).
His rendition of the theme from the television series Mad About You, titled “Final Frontier,” was used as the wake-up call for the Mars Pathfinder space probe in 1996.
Gold was a prolific multi-instrumentalist as artist, producer, film composer, session musician, actor, painter, and singer.

(August 2, 1951 – June 3, 2011)

Early life

Andrew Maurice Gold was born in Burbank, California,[1] and later joined a family business. His mother is singer Marni Nixon (who provided the singing voice for numerous actresses, notably Natalie Wood in West Side Story, Deborah Kerr in The King and I, and Audrey Hepburn in My Fair Lady); his father was Ernest Gold, the Academy Award-winning composer for the movie Exodus.[4] He has two younger sisters. Gold began writing songs at the age of 13.

Career

1970-1979

By the early 1970s he was working as a musician, songwriter and record producer for many musicians. He was a member of the Los Angeles band Bryndle alongside Kenny Edwards, Wendy Waldman and Karla Bonoff. He played a major role as multi-instrumentalist and arranger for Ronstadt’s breakthrough album, 1974’s Heart Like a Wheel, and her next four albums. Among other accomplishments, he played the majority of instruments on the album’s first track, including the guitar work on “You’re No Good,” Ronstadt’s first #1 single on the Billboard Hot 100, and the same on “When Will I Be Loved“, “Heatwave“, and many others. He was in her band from 1973 until 1977, and then sporadically throughout the 1980s and 1990s.
In 1975, Gold began recording as a solo artist, releasing four studio albums in the 1970s and over twelve since then. His hit single “Lonely Boy” reached #7 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in June, 1977[5] and has appeared in many film soundtracks, including Boogie Nights (1997) and Adam Sandler‘s movie Water Boy, among others. Although “Lonely Boy” was the bigger radio hit in the States, his single “Thank You For Being A Friend” (which peaked at #25 in 1978[6]) later gained popularity as the theme song for the 1985–1992 NBC situation comedy The Golden Girls (performed by Cindy Fee for the show). Gold is also known for his biggest UK hit song “Never Let Her Slip Away”, which was a UK #5 hit twice, by him and again at #5 fourteen years later by Undercover. Freddie Mercury, who was a friend of Gold’s, assisted him with the harmony background vocals of the song. Gold was pleased that Petula Clark covered ‘Lonely Boy’ in French (‘Poor Lonesome Playboy’). It is on her ‘Paris, Orleans, Paris’ set. He attended one of her performances and reminded her that she had recorded the song. In 1976 Gold wrote the title track ‘Endless Flight’ for Leo Sayer’s hit album.
1975 also marked a successful collaboration with Art Garfunkel, playing most of the instruments on Garfunkel’s solo hit “I Only Have Eyes For You” (which went to no.1 on the UK Singles Chart), as well as several other cuts on Garfunkel’s album Breakaway, and Gold played guitar on two cuts of Eric Carmen‘s, Boats Against the Current album, including “She Did It“, which was a #23 hit that same year.[7] Throughout the years, he played and/or sang on records and/or live performances with Carly Simon, Jennifer Warnes, Stephen Bishop, Nicolette Larson, Maria Muldaur, Neil Diamond, Barbi Benton, Juice Newton, Leo Sayer, The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Karla Bonoff, Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, John Lennon, Brian Wilson, Don Henley, Cher‘s hit album, Heart of Stone, wrote hits for Trisha Yearwood, Wynonna Judd, for whom he co-wrote the #1 single “I Saw The Light” with Lisa Angelle, who he later produced in her own right. He toured with The Eagles, played on records and toured with Jackson Browne, produced, wrote and sang/played on three 10cc tracks; played and sang on record, and toured with James Taylor, produced singles for Vince Gill, and wrote and produced for Celine Dion; was second engineer on part of Joni Mitchell‘s Blue album.

1980-2011

In the early 1980s, after 10cc’s 1981 album Ten Out of 10 was completed, founding members Eric Stewart and Graham Gouldman invited Gold to become a member. Although he was a fan of “I’m Not In Love” and “The Things We Do for Love”, and wanted to join, business conflicts prevented him from doing so. In late 1983, 10cc broke up, but Gold and Gouldman formed Wax. Wax recorded and toured for five years, enjoying success worldwide and had several top 10 hits including “Right Between the Eyes”, and their biggest hit “Bridge to Your Heart“. In 1986, interestingly, the duo had a #1 hit in Spain, lasting 6 months on top, and in a bizarre record company decision, no further singles were released there. The band broke up in 1989, but Gold and Gouldman continued to write and record together when possible.
During the 1990s Gold once again joined forces with bandmates Karla Bonoff, Wendy Waldman and Kenny Edwards to re-form Bryndle and release their first album. In 1996, he left Bryndle and released, Halloween Howls, considered by Dr. Demento as one of the two best Halloween albums in history.The same year he recorded under a pseudonym, The Fraternal Order Of The All, “Greetings from Planet Love” on his own record label, QBrain Records. This album utilized a fake 1960s band, with original songs in the style of Gold’s favorite 1960s bands, such as The Beatles, The Byrds and The Beach Boys. He released a rareties Wax album, Bikini Wax, and the same year he released ….Since 1951. He has since also produced, composed, and/or written songs for numerous films, such as the comedy Rectuma from director Mark Pirro and contributed songs for many television soundtracks and commercials. He also sang “Final Frontier”, the theme song for the Paul Reiser/Helen Hunt sitcom Mad About You. He produced seven albums for Eikichi Yazawa.

Personal life

Gold married Vanessa Gold (step sister of Billy Brown http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orchestra_JB) with whom he had three daughters.[4] After his divorce, he married Leslie Kogan.[4]
Although Gold put personal references in “Lonely Boy” (1975) including his year of birth, he told Spencer Leigh in an interview that it was not autobiographical: “Maybe it was a mistake to do that but I simply put in those details because it was convenient. I hadn’t been a lonely boy at all – I’d had a very happy childhood.”[8]

Death

On June 3, 2011, Gold died in his sleep, apparently from heart failure,[1] at age 59 (two months before his 60th birthday) in Los Angeles after having been treated for renal cancer.[4] He is survived by Kogan, his three daughters and his mother, Marni Nixon.[9]

Discography

Albums

  • 1975: Andrew Gold
  • 1976: What’s Wrong with This Picture? (95 US)
  • 1978: All This and Heaven Too (81 US)(#31 UK)[10]
  • 1978: An Interview with Andrew Gold [Promo-only interview & music LP]
  • 1979: Whirlwind
  • 1991: Home is Where the Heart Is
  • 1996: …Since 1951
  • 1996: Halloween Howls (as Andrew Gold & Friends)
  • 1997: Thank You for Being a Friend (compilation album)
  • 1998: Leftovers
  • 1998: Warm Breezes
  • 2000: The Spence Manor Suite
  • 2002: Intermission
  • 2008: Copy Cat

With Wax

  • 1984: Common Knowledge
  • 1986: Magnetic Heaven
  • 1987: American English
  • 1989: A Hundred Thousand in Fresh Notes
  • 1997: The Wax Files (‘Best of’ compilation)
  • 2000: Wax Bikini (Compilation of outtakes, demos, etc.)

With Bryndle

  • 1995: Bryndle

Singles

  • 1968: “Of All The Little Girls” (UK release – recorded as duo of ‘Villiers & Gold’)
  • 1970: “Woke Up This Morning” (with the band ‘Bryndle’)
  • 1975: “Heartaches in Heartaches”
  • 1975: “That Is Why I Love You” (#68 US)
  • 1976: “Stay”
  • 1976: “Do Wah Diddy”
  • 1976: “One Of Them Is Me”
  • 1977: “Lonely Boy” (#7 US; #11 UK)[10]
  • 1977: “Go Back Home Again”
  • 1978: “How Can This Be Love” (#19 UK)[10]
  • 1978: “I’m On My Way”
  • 1978: “Thank You for Being a Friend” (#25 US; #42 UK)[10]
  • 1978: “Never Let Her Slip Away” (#67 US; #5 UK)[10]
  • 1979: “Kiss This One Goodbye”
  • 1979: “Stranded On The Edge”
  • 1979: “Nine To Five” (UK)

With Graham Gouldman as WAX;

  • 1984: “Don’t Break My Heart” (UK – Released under the band’s initial name of World In Action)
  • 1984: “Don’t Break My Heart” (UK – Re-released under the band’s subsequent name of Common Knowledge)
  • 1985: “Victoria” (UK – Released under the band name of Common Knowledge)
  • 1986: “Right Between The Eyes” (#60 UK )[11]
  • 1986: “Ball & Chain”
  • 1986: “Shadows Of Love”
  • 1986: “Systematic” (UK)
  • 1987: “Bridge to Your Heart” (#12 UK)[11]
  • 1987: “In Some Other World” (UK & Germany)
  • 1987: “American English” (Germany)
  • 1989: “Anchors Aweigh” (UK)
  • 1989: “Wherever You Are” (UK)

He had a worldwide #5 (average) hit in over 5 major countries[vague][clarification needed] with “Bridge To Your Heart”, and a #43 album in the US, Magnetic Heaven.
Some singles released as promo copies only; some chart numbers are from the magazines Cashbox and Record World.

 

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John Henry Johnson, American Hall of Fame football player (San Francisco 49ers, Pittsburgh Steelers) died he was , 81.


John Henry Johnson was an American football fullback died he was , 81. He played from 1954 to 1965 for the San Francisco 49ers, the Detroit Lions, and the Pittsburgh Steelers of the National Football League. Outside of the NFL, Johnson also played one season with the Calgary Stampeders of the Canadian Football League in 1953, and with the Houston Oilers of the American Football League in 1966.

(November 24, 1929 – June 3, 2011)

College football

Prior to his professional career, he split his college career between Saint Mary’s College of California and Arizona State University. He was also a member of Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity.

Professional career

He is best remembered for being a member of the 49ers famed “Million Dollar Backfield“. Upon his retirement, John was ranked fourth on pro football’s all-time rushing list, behind only Jim Brown, Jim Taylor and his fellow “Million Dollar Backfield” teammate, Joe Perry. He is also still currently ranked fourth on the all-time Steelers rushing list, behind only Franco Harris, Jerome Bettis, and Willie Parker. In 1987, he was selected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame. The 49ers “Million Dollar Backfield” is currently the only full-house backfield to have all four of its members enshrined in the Hall of Fame.

Death

On Friday, June 3, 2011, Johnson died in Tracy, California at the age of 81.[2] On June 9, 2011, it was announced that Johnson and his fellow “Million Dollar Backfield” teammate, Joe Perry, who died on April 25, 2011, would have their brains examined by researchers at Boston University who are studying head injuries in sports. Both men were suspected of suffering form Chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a disorder linked to repeated brain trauma. According to his daughter, Johnson couldn’t talk or swallow in the final year of his life and also was in a wheelchair. She told the San Francisco Chronicle that she hopes by donating her father’s brain, it will “help with a cure.”[3]

 

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Did you know that Angus T. Jones deal features a guaranteed $7.8 million for the next two seasons of Two and a Half Men plus a $500,000 signing bonus?

Did you know that Angus T. Jones of Two and a Half Men, is now the highest paid kid in Hollywood?


Did you know that Jones at the moment with gets $300,000-per-episode? 


Did you know that Angus T. Jones deal features a guaranteed $7.8 million for the next two seasons of Two and a Half Men plus a $500,000 signing bonus?

Miranda Cosgrove

Did you know that Miranda Cosgrove for heriCarly role on Nickelodeon, is current receiving the second highest for a child which is $180,000 per episode, which is a huge difference from Jones current and past paycheck.

Now if you didn’t know, now you know…

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