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Archive for May 14, 2012

1 person got busted onSeptember 3, 2011


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4 people got busted on September 2, 2011


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1 person got busted onSeptember 1, 2011


James M. Flinchum, American journalist died he was , 94.

James Maxwell Flinchum, Jr. , known as Jim Flinchum, was from 1961 until his retirement in 1985 the editor-in-chief of the Wyoming State Tribune, one of two forerunners of the existing Wyoming Tribune Eagle in Cheyenne, Wyoming died he was , 94..

(November 5, 1916 – August 2, 2011)

Early years

Flinchum was born in Caddo in Bryan County in southern Oklahoma. In 1939, Flinchum obtained a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Oklahoma at Norman. For two years he was the editor of The Norman Transcript prior to joining the United Press wire service. During World War II, he was through 1945 a United States Army platoon leader and officer in the Pacific theater based in the Philippines. He won the Bronze Star. After the war, Flinchum returned to United Press, where he was based first in Little Rock, Arkansas. Thereafter, he was stationed in Denver, Colorado and Dallas and Houston, Texas.[1]

Journalist in Cheyenne

Considered a demanding journalist with an encyclopedic knowledge of
public affairs, Flinchum pushed his reporters to excel and rejected
incomplete stories. He had difficulty when the newsroom was converted
from typewriters to computers but persisted with hard-hitting editorials
for the Wyoming State Tribune.[2]
A Republican, Flinchum stayed active in local politics after his retirement from the Tribune Eagle
through the interest group, Citizens Opposing Spendthrift Taxation.
Jack Quirk of Cheyenne, the president of the group, said that he and
Flinchum talked weekly even as the former editor lost his eyesight.[2]
Jim Angell, executive director of the Wyoming Press Association and a former reporter for the Associated Press,
describes Flinchum as “fair” in his editing and writing. Angell refers
to Flinchum as an old-school journalist who stressed the facts and
accurate reporting: “He was a legend in the community.”[2]
Flinchum was active in the YMCA and Rotary International.[1] In 1971, he wrote a short article in Field and Stream magazine highlighting the many fishing waters of Wyoming.[3]

Death

Flinchum died in Cheyenne at the age of ninety-four. He was survived
by his wife, the former Nancy Reynolds of Cheyenne, whom he married in
1948, and two daughters, Nancy Prosser and her husband, Edward Riner Prosser, of Cheyenne, a Republican former member of the Wyoming House of Representatives, and Suzy Deger and her husband, Tim, of Franktown, Colorado; two grandchildren, Jackie Parker and husband, Todd, of Colbert, Georgia and Brent Prosser and wife, Dana, of Grand Junction, Colorado, and five great-grandchildren.[1]
Graveside services were held on August 6 at Lakeview Cemetery in Cheyenne.[1]

 

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Al Federoff, American baseball player (Detroit Tigers) died he was , 87.

Alfred Federoff , nicknamed “Whitey,” was an American professional baseball infielder and manager died he was , 87.. He spent his career in minor league baseball, except for 76 games spread over the 1951 and 1952 seasons, when he was a member of the Detroit Tigers of Major League Baseball.

(July 11, 1924 – August 2, 2011)

Federoff graduated from high school in Etna, Pennsylvania, and attended Duquesne University for two years.[3]
He threw and batted right-handed, stood 5 feet 11 inches (1.8 m) tall
and weighed 165 pounds (75 kg) as an active player. His playing career
extended from 1946 through 1959, with another decade spent as a minor
league manager (1960–61; 1963–70). Most of his career was spent with the
Tigers: he signed with Detroit in 1946, played for seven seasons in
their farm system,
and then managed in that system for nine more years during the 1960s.
As a skipper, his teams won two league championships. He was a Tigers’ scout in 1962.
For the MLB Tigers in 1951–52, Federoff played 71 games as a second baseman and batted .238 in 235 at bats, with no home runs and 14 runs batted in. He was a .279 hitter during his minor league career, where he saw service with the Triple-A Toledo Mud Hens, Buffalo Bisons and Louisville Colonels, and the Open Classification San Diego Padres and Seattle Rainiers.[4]

 

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DeLois Barrett Campbell, American gospel singer (The Barrett Sisters), died from pulmonary embolism he was , 85.

Delois Barrett Campbell

(March 12, 1926 –
August 2, 2011)

 Delois Barrett Campbell , began her career as the lead singer of the world famous
Roberta Martin Singers
while still in high school. As a member of Roberta Martin Singers,
DeLois traveled around the United States and the world singing for the
Lord, but she soon placed her career on hold to started her family.
DeLois became a mother and a pastor’s wife.

Recent years

DeLois Barrett Campbell died August 2, 2011. She was 85.[2]
She had been wheelchair bound for years. In late 2009, she lost her
voice and could not sing anymore but she was still present during some
of the concerts with a microphone in her hand. She had battled arthritis
and other health issues.[3]
The other sisters are still performing, recording, and serving the
Lord. Their most recent release is on I AM Records and is entitled “What
A Wonderful World.” DeLois had her last annual birthday concert
celebration at First Church of Deliverance in Chicago, that included
performances with her sisters Billie and Rodessa.

The Barrett Sisters are an American award-winning gospel trio from Chicago, Illinois. The trio consisted of sisters DeLois Barrett Campbell, Billie Barrett GreenBey and Rodessa Barrett Porter. They have been singing together for more than 40 years.

History

The Barrett Sisters grew up in poverty in Chicago, Illinois. They had seven siblings. Four of their siblings died from tuberculosis.[1]
They were raised by strict spiritual parents. They were not allowed to
listen to blues music. In 1930s, the three sisters began singing gospel
with their cousin, and their vocal coach was their aunt Mattie Dacus.
Like many of their cohorts, they thought that the only hope for a music
career; they would have to enter into the secular world. But The Barrett Sisters knew that would deeply hurt their parents, who believed that secular music had no place in the lives of the saved.
In the mid-1960s, the sisters regrouped to record their first album on the Savoy Records,
“Jesus Loves Me,” on which they recorded Sam Cooke’s “Wonderful”. They
followed with “I’ll Fly Away” and “Carry Me Back” where they were joined
with Roberta Martin on “I Hear God”. Ms. Martin sang lead on the title
track. Since then, The Barrett Sisters have become one of the world
famous female gospel groups. They have performed at countless churches
and in many respected concert halls including the Lincoln Center in NYC,
Constitution Hall in Washington, DC, Orchestra Hall in Chicago, and
Theatre-DeVille in Paris, France. The Barrett Sisters have toured
internationally over thirty times. In the 70’s they recorded two albums
for Nashboro’s subsidiary label Creed: “God So Loved The World” and
“Coming Again So Soon”. Ms. Campbell followed with a solo album also on
Creed called “Through It All”.
The Barrett Sisters represented the United States in Africa, as
Goodwill Ambassadors of 1983, and in the South Pacific for six week in
1987. They have also performed for several notable leaders including the
King of Sweden and the President of Zaire, Africa. The Barrett Sisters
are associated with numerous celebrities and big names in entertainment
including the late Queen of Gospel Albertina Walker, Thomas A. Dorsey (National Singers Convention), Rev. James Cleveland, Andre Crouch, The Mighty Clouds of Joy, Shirley Caesar, The Winans, Willie Mae Ford Smith and Patti LaBelle.

Radio, television, and film

The Barrett Sisters made their first appearance on radio and
television in the 1960s. They have appeared on “The Tonight Show with
Johnny Carson,” “The Oprah Winfrey Show,””Bobby Jones Show,” “Living the
Dream,” a television tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, PBS special
“Going Home to Gospel with Patti LaBelle,” along with Gospel Queen Albertina Walker,
and the “PTL Club.” They’ve been featured several times on the locally
produced Emmy Award winning “Jubilee Showcase.” They have appeared on The Stellar Awards, which included accepting 2009 Walgreens’ Ambassador Bobby Jones Legend Award.
In 1982, The Barrett Sisters were featured in the critically acclaimed documentary “Say Amen, Somebody,” which features Willie Mae Ford Smith, Sallie Martin, Thomas A. Dorsey, The O’Neal Twins, and Zella Jackson Price. They were also featured on the soundtrack.

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Ralph Berkowitz, American composer died he was , 100.

Ralph Berkowitz  was an American composer, classical musician, and painter.

(September 5, 1910 – August 2, 2011)

Biography

Berkowitz was born in Brooklyn, New York to a Romanian Jewish couple, Matilda and William Berkowitz who had emigrated from Roman and Bucharest. His father was instrumental in shaping young Ralph’s musical culture and experience.[3] In 1927, he enrolled at the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia where he later became a member of the teaching staff.[4] In 1940, he became accompanist for Gregor Piatigorsky, with whom he appeared until the cellist’s death in 1976. Other musical partners included the tenor Jan Peerce, cellist Felix Salmond, and violinist and composer George Enescu. He recorded extensively with Piatigorsky and others, including the violinist Eudice Shapiro.
From 1946 to 1951, Berkowitz served as an executive assistant to Serge Koussevitzky at Tanglewood
and later became Dean of the Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood in
1951, a position he held until 1961. As Dean, he presided over a faculty
that included Aaron Copland, Leonard Bernstein, and many others. Illustrious students in those years included Zubin Mehta, Lorin Maazel and Claudio Abbado.
He, along with Boston Symphony manager Todd Perry, was largely
instrumental in keeping the Tanglewood Festival alive following
Koussevitsky’s death.
Berkowitz has been widely published as an arranger and composer. His A Telephone Call, for singer and orchestra is his most extended work.
In 1961 Berkowitz moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico,
where he lived until his death in 2011. He first came to Albuquerque in
1940 to serve as a guest artist with a chamber music series called The
June Music Festival. He remained active as an artist for the Festival
into the 1980s. Berkowitz became manager of the then Albuquerque Civic
Orchestra (now New Mexico Symphony Orchestra) when he moved to New
Mexico and served until 1968, seeing the Orchestra through its move to
its current home—Popejoy Hall at the University of New Mexico.
Berkowitz commissioned Daron Hagen
to compose one of his most intellectually rigorous works, a set of
Piano Variations based on a theme made up of pitches derived from
Berkowitz’s and Hagen’s names, in 2002. The work is available from Carl Fischer. Berkowitz reached his centenary in September 2010[5] and died in August of the following year.

Discography

  • “RCA Red Seal Century – Soloists & Conductors”, 2 CD / RCA Records / 2001-10-23
  • “Stravinsky: Petroushka Suite; Toch: Violin Sonata”, 1 CD / Crystal Records / 1998-01-02 [6]

 

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Baruj Benacerraf, Venezuelan-born American immunologist, Nobel laureate (1980) died he was , 90.

Clarence Ellsworth Miller, Jr. was a Republican Congressman from Ohio, serving January 3, 1967 to January 3, 1993 died from pneumonia he was , 93..
He was born in Lancaster, Ohio,
one of six children of an electrician father. After graduating from
high school, he enrolled in correspondence school and became a certified
electrical engineer. He worked for Columbia Gas and held patents
related to the pumping of gas.[1]
Miller was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1966 to
represent a section of southeastern Ohio where, in Lancaster, he had
served as mayor. During the Persian Gulf War, he was reportedly the only
member of Congress who had a grandson (Drew Miller, of Lancaster, Ohio)
fighting in that conflict.[1]
By training, he was an engineer, and the Almanac of American Politics
wrote that Mr. Miller approached politics with the “precise and orderly
manner” that one might expect from someone of his profession.

(November 1, 1917 – August 2, 2011)

US Patents

U.S. Patent 3,088,655,
Filed August 1, 1960, Patented May 7, 1963 “Remote Control and Alarm
System For A Compressor Station and Compressor Engines Thereof”
U.S. Patent 3,210,582, Filed July 26. 1960, Patented Oct. 5, 1965 “Magneto Having Auxiliary Pole Piece”

Elections

In 1966, the Tenth Congressional District elected Miller to the Ninetieth Congress, defeating incumbent Democrat Walter H. Moeller, and he was re-elected to twelve succeeding Congresses.
Miller was a 13-term Ohio Republican nicknamed “Five Percent
Clarence” for his persistent efforts to cut spending bills by that
amount. He did not cultivate publicity, preferring instead to focus on
legislation more than on the Washington talk-show circuit. He was known
for his near-perfect attendance on votes no matter how minute. In 1990,
the Capitol Hill publication Roll Call named Mr. Miller the “most
obscure” member of Congress. It was intended as a compliment,
considering that grandstanders never would have received such an honor. A
fiscal conservative, he served on the House Appropriations Committee.
The numerous bills he introduced, often unsuccessfully, aimed to cut
spending measures—if not by the 5 percent figure in his nickname, then
at least by 2 percent. In 1977, he succeeded in persuading House
colleagues to cut foreign aid by 5 percent.[1]
He lost his bid for reelection in the 1992 primary after redistricting. [1]

Elections by landslide


In his younger years.

Twelve of the thirteen elections won by Mr. Miller were by a margin of victory of greater than 25%.

Heated 1992 primary

Ohio lost two seats in the 1990 reapportionment. The Democrats and Republicans in the Ohio General Assembly
struck a deal to eliminate one Democratic and one Republican district,
as one congressman from each party was expected to retire. The
Republican expected to retire was Miller, but he announced he would run
again. The Democrats in the Statehouse would not reconsider the deal and
so Miller’s Tenth District was obliterated. (The new Tenth was in Cuyahoga County.)
The new district map was not agreed upon by the General Assembly
until March 26, 1992, one week before the filing deadline for the
primary originally scheduled for May 5. (Governor George Voinovich
signed the new map into law on March 27, and the General Assembly moved
the primary to June 2 on April 1.) Miller’s own hometown was placed in
freshman David Hobson‘s Seventh District, but Miller chose to run in the Sixth District against Bob McEwen;
only one of the twelve counties in Miller’s old Tenth District was in
the new Seventh but the largest piece of his old district, five
counties, was placed in the new Sixth. Miller also had a strong distaste
for McEwen, a Hillsboro Republican in his sixth term who had been elected to Congress at age thirty.
Despite being hurt in a fall in his bathtub after slipping on a bar
of soap, an injury that led Republicans to expect his withdrawal, Miller
stayed in the race. A deal was hoped for as late as May 15, the day
Miller was scheduled to hold a press conference Ohio political observers
thought he would use to announce his withdrawal, but Miller stayed in
the race and the two incumbents faced each other in the Republican
primary on June 2, 1992.
McEwen, who Congressional Quarterly’s Politics in America pronounced “invincible”, was caught up in the House banking scandal, which had been seized upon by Newt Gingrich, a like-minded conservative House Republican, as an example of the corruption of Congress. Martin Gottlieb of the Dayton Daily News
said “McEwen was collateral damage” to Gingrich’s crusade. McEwen
initially denied bouncing any checks. Later, he admitted he had bounced a
few. Then when the full totals were released by Ethics Committee
investigators, the number was revealed to have been 166 over
thirty-nine months. McEwen said that he always had funds available to
cover the alleged overdrafts, pointing to the policy of the House
sergeant at arms, who ran the House bank, paying checks on an overdrawn
account if it would not exceed the sum of the Representative’s next
paycheck. In 1991, McEwen had also been criticized for his use of the franking privilege
and his frequent trips overseas at taxpayer expense, but McEwen
defended the trips as part of his work on the Intelligence Committee and
in building relationships with legislatures overseas.
The primary race was bitter. Miller called McEwen “Pinocchio
and McEwen said of Miller “his misrepresentations and falsehoods are
gargantuan. I tried to be his best friend in the delegation. I am deeply
disappointed at the meanness of his effort.” Tom Deimer of Cleveland’s Plain Dealer
wrote that the two candidates were largely identical on the issues:
“both are textbook Republican conservatives, opposed to abortion, gun
control, high taxes, and costly government programs — unless located in
their districts.” Miller noted he had no overdrafts, saying, “the score
is 166 to nothing” referring to the number of checks McEwen bounced in
the House banking scandal.
The 1992 primary was so close it forced a recount and a lawsuit. When Ohio Secretary of State Bob Taft dismissed Miller’s charges of voting irregularities in Highland, Hocking, and Warren Counties, Miller filed suit in the Ohio Supreme Court.
Only in August did Miller drop his court challenge and then only
because his campaign was out of money. In the final count, McEwen won
33,219 votes to Miller’s 32,922, a plurality of only 297 votes.
Ominously for November, each had won the counties they had formerly
represented, McEwen making little headway in the new eastern counties in
the district. After the final result, Miller refused to endorse McEwen
and carried an unsuccessful legal challenge to the redistricting to the United States Supreme Court,
insisting district lines should be drawn on a politically neutral
basis. After the primary, McEwen introduced H. R. 5727 in the House to
name the locks on the Ohio near Gallipolis after Miller, but the bill did not pass.[2] McEwen subsequently lost the general election that year to Ted Strickland.

Family

His wife of 51 years, the former Helen Brown, died in 1987. The
couple had two children, Ronald K. Miller of Lancaster and Jacqueline M.
Williams of Cincinnati; five grandchildren; and nine
great-grandchildren.[1]

Death

Clarence Miller returned to Lancaster, where he resided at the time of his death on August 2, 2011, aged 93.

 

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Clarence E. Miller, American politician, U.S. Representative from Ohio (1967–1993), died from pneumonia he was ,

Clarence Ellsworth Miller, Jr. was a Republican Congressman from Ohio, serving January 3, 1967 to January 3, 1993 died from pneumonia he was , 93..
He was born in Lancaster, Ohio,
one of six children of an electrician father. After graduating from
high school, he enrolled in correspondence school and became a certified
electrical engineer. He worked for Columbia Gas and held patents
related to the pumping of gas.[1]
Miller was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1966 to
represent a section of southeastern Ohio where, in Lancaster, he had
served as mayor. During the Persian Gulf War, he was reportedly the only
member of Congress who had a grandson (Drew Miller, of Lancaster, Ohio)
fighting in that conflict.[1]
By training, he was an engineer, and the Almanac of American Politics
wrote that Mr. Miller approached politics with the “precise and orderly
manner” that one might expect from someone of his profession.

(November 1, 1917 – August 2, 2011)

US Patents

U.S. Patent 3,088,655,
Filed August 1, 1960, Patented May 7, 1963 “Remote Control and Alarm
System For A Compressor Station and Compressor Engines Thereof”
U.S. Patent 3,210,582, Filed July 26. 1960, Patented Oct. 5, 1965 “Magneto Having Auxiliary Pole Piece”

Elections

In 1966, the Tenth Congressional District elected Miller to the Ninetieth Congress, defeating incumbent Democrat Walter H. Moeller, and he was re-elected to twelve succeeding Congresses.
Miller was a 13-term Ohio Republican nicknamed “Five Percent
Clarence” for his persistent efforts to cut spending bills by that
amount. He did not cultivate publicity, preferring instead to focus on
legislation more than on the Washington talk-show circuit. He was known
for his near-perfect attendance on votes no matter how minute. In 1990,
the Capitol Hill publication Roll Call named Mr. Miller the “most
obscure” member of Congress. It was intended as a compliment,
considering that grandstanders never would have received such an honor. A
fiscal conservative, he served on the House Appropriations Committee.
The numerous bills he introduced, often unsuccessfully, aimed to cut
spending measures—if not by the 5 percent figure in his nickname, then
at least by 2 percent. In 1977, he succeeded in persuading House
colleagues to cut foreign aid by 5 percent.[1]
He lost his bid for reelection in the 1992 primary after redistricting. [1]

Elections by landslide


In his younger years.

Twelve of the thirteen elections won by Mr. Miller were by a margin of victory of greater than 25%.

Heated 1992 primary

Ohio lost two seats in the 1990 reapportionment. The Democrats and Republicans in the Ohio General Assembly
struck a deal to eliminate one Democratic and one Republican district,
as one congressman from each party was expected to retire. The
Republican expected to retire was Miller, but he announced he would run
again. The Democrats in the Statehouse would not reconsider the deal and
so Miller’s Tenth District was obliterated. (The new Tenth was in Cuyahoga County.)
The new district map was not agreed upon by the General Assembly
until March 26, 1992, one week before the filing deadline for the
primary originally scheduled for May 5. (Governor George Voinovich
signed the new map into law on March 27, and the General Assembly moved
the primary to June 2 on April 1.) Miller’s own hometown was placed in
freshman David Hobson‘s Seventh District, but Miller chose to run in the Sixth District against Bob McEwen;
only one of the twelve counties in Miller’s old Tenth District was in
the new Seventh but the largest piece of his old district, five
counties, was placed in the new Sixth. Miller also had a strong distaste
for McEwen, a Hillsboro Republican in his sixth term who had been elected to Congress at age thirty.
Despite being hurt in a fall in his bathtub after slipping on a bar
of soap, an injury that led Republicans to expect his withdrawal, Miller
stayed in the race. A deal was hoped for as late as May 15, the day
Miller was scheduled to hold a press conference Ohio political observers
thought he would use to announce his withdrawal, but Miller stayed in
the race and the two incumbents faced each other in the Republican
primary on June 2, 1992.
McEwen, who Congressional Quarterly’s Politics in America pronounced “invincible”, was caught up in the House banking scandal, which had been seized upon by Newt Gingrich, a like-minded conservative House Republican, as an example of the corruption of Congress. Martin Gottlieb of the Dayton Daily News
said “McEwen was collateral damage” to Gingrich’s crusade. McEwen
initially denied bouncing any checks. Later, he admitted he had bounced a
few. Then when the full totals were released by Ethics Committee
investigators, the number was revealed to have been 166 over
thirty-nine months. McEwen said that he always had funds available to
cover the alleged overdrafts, pointing to the policy of the House
sergeant at arms, who ran the House bank, paying checks on an overdrawn
account if it would not exceed the sum of the Representative’s next
paycheck. In 1991, McEwen had also been criticized for his use of the franking privilege
and his frequent trips overseas at taxpayer expense, but McEwen
defended the trips as part of his work on the Intelligence Committee and
in building relationships with legislatures overseas.
The primary race was bitter. Miller called McEwen “Pinocchio
and McEwen said of Miller “his misrepresentations and falsehoods are
gargantuan. I tried to be his best friend in the delegation. I am deeply
disappointed at the meanness of his effort.” Tom Deimer of Cleveland’s Plain Dealer
wrote that the two candidates were largely identical on the issues:
“both are textbook Republican conservatives, opposed to abortion, gun
control, high taxes, and costly government programs — unless located in
their districts.” Miller noted he had no overdrafts, saying, “the score
is 166 to nothing” referring to the number of checks McEwen bounced in
the House banking scandal.
The 1992 primary was so close it forced a recount and a lawsuit. When Ohio Secretary of State Bob Taft dismissed Miller’s charges of voting irregularities in Highland, Hocking, and Warren Counties, Miller filed suit in the Ohio Supreme Court.
Only in August did Miller drop his court challenge and then only
because his campaign was out of money. In the final count, McEwen won
33,219 votes to Miller’s 32,922, a plurality of only 297 votes.
Ominously for November, each had won the counties they had formerly
represented, McEwen making little headway in the new eastern counties in
the district. After the final result, Miller refused to endorse McEwen
and carried an unsuccessful legal challenge to the redistricting to the United States Supreme Court,
insisting district lines should be drawn on a politically neutral
basis. After the primary, McEwen introduced H. R. 5727 in the House to
name the locks on the Ohio near Gallipolis after Miller, but the bill did not pass.[2] McEwen subsequently lost the general election that year to Ted Strickland.

Family

His wife of 51 years, the former Helen Brown, died in 1987. The
couple had two children, Ronald K. Miller of Lancaster and Jacqueline M.
Williams of Cincinnati; five grandchildren; and nine
great-grandchildren.[1]

Death

Clarence Miller returned to Lancaster, where he resided at the time of his death on August 2, 2011, aged 93.

 

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Leslie Esdaile Banks, American author (The Vampire Huntress Legend Series), died from adrenal cancer she was , 51

Leslie Esdaile Banks, née Peterson  was an American writer under the pennames of Leslie Esdaile, Leslie E. Banks, Leslie Banks, Leslie Esdaile Banks and L. A. Banks died from adrenal cancer she was , 51. She wrote in various genres, including African American literature, romance, women’s fiction, crime suspense, dark fantasy/horror and non-fiction.
She won several literary awards, including the 2008 Essence Literary Awards Storyteller of the Year.


(December 11, 1959 – August 2, 2011)

Biography

Leslie Ann Peterson was born and raised in Philadelphia. She married
Michael Eslaide, and they had a daughter, she remarried with Al Banks in
2000.
She contributed to magazines, newspaper columns, and wrote commercial
fiction for five major publishers: St. Martin’s Press (NYC), Simon and Schuster (NYC), Kensington Publishing (NYC), BET/Arabesque (NYC), and Genesis Press (MS).[4]
Books 1 and 2 of The Vampire Huntress Legend Series (Minion and The Awakening, respectively), have been optioned for Hollywood films by GothamBeach Entertainment and Griot Entertainment. Originally a nine book series, The Vampire Huntress Legend Series has now been expanded to twelve books (the last being called “The Thirteenth”).[5]
She was a founding partner of The Liars Club, a networking group of
professional in publishing and other aspects of entertainment.

Illness and death

In June 2011 it was announced on Banks’ website that she had been
diagnosed with late stage adrenal cancer. It was revealed that due to
the extreme costs of her medical care, her family opened up a charitable
fund in her name in one of the local Pennsylvania banks. The literary
community also rallied around the ailing author, with several supporters
starting a series of auctions where the proceeds went towards Banks’
medical care. [6][7] Many well known people such as bestselling authors P.N. Elrod, Heather Graham and Charlaine Harris donated books and services, as would others in the literary community. [8] On August 2, 2011, the official website of L.A. Banks was updated to reflect her death.
Leslie Ann Peterson Esdaile Banks died on August 2, 2011, aged 51.[9] She is survived by her daughter.

Bibliography

As Leslie Esdaile

Romance novels

  • Sundance (1996)
  • Slow Burn (1997)
  • Love Notes (2001)
  • Love Lessons (2001)
  • River of Souls (2001)
  • Love Potions (2002)
  • Still Waters Run Deep (2002)
  • Tomorrow’s Promise (2002)
  • Through the Storm (2002)
  • Sister Got Game (2004)
  • Keepin’ It Real (2005)
  • Take Me There (2006)
  • Better Than (June 2008)

Romance novellas

  • “Home For The Holidays” in Midnight Clear (et al.) (2000) (*)
  • “Time Enough for Love” in After the Vows (et al.) (2001) (*)
  • “Valentine’s Love” in Candlelight and You (et al.) (2003) (*)
  • “Shameless” in Sisterhood of Shopaholics (et al.) (2003) (*)
  • “A ‘No Drama’ Valentine’s” in Valentin’s Day is Killing Me (et al.) (2006) (*)

Alexis Grant

Men of the Delta Force Series

  • Sizzle & Burn
  • Locked at Loaded

Non-Fiction

  • How To Write A Romance For The New Market (1999) (*)

As Leslie E. Banks

Romance novels

  • Soul Food: For Better, For Worse (2002)
  • Soul Food: Through Thick and Thin (2003)

As Leslie Banks

Non-Fiction

  • “Light at the End of the Tunnel” in Chicken Soup for the African American Soul (2004) (*)

As Leslie Esdaile Banks

Crime/Suspense

  • Betrayal of the Trust (2004)
  • Blind Trust (2005)
  • Shattered Trust (2006)
  • No Trust (final book) (September 2007)

As L. A. Banks

Crime/Suspense

  • Scarface, The Beginning, Volume 1 (2006)
  • Scarface, Point of No Return, Volume 2 (TBD)

Paranormal

The Vampire Huntress Legend Series

  1. Minion (trade paperback) (2003) (mass market) (2004)
  2. The Awakening (trade paperback) (2004) (mass market) (2004)
  3. The Hunted (trade paperback) (2004) (mass market) (2005)
  4. The Bitten(trade paperback) (2005) (mass market) (2005)
  5. The Forbidden (trade paperback) (2005) (mass market) (2006)
  6. The Damned (trade paperback) (2006) (mass market) (2007)
  7. The Forsaken (trade paperback) (2006) (mass market) (2007)
  8. The Wicked (trade paperback) (2007) (mass market) (2008)
  9. The Cursed (trade paperback) (2007) (mass market) (2008)
  10. The Darkness (trade paperback) (2008) (mass market) (2008)
  11. The Shadows (trade paperback) (2008) (Book 11) (2009)
  12. The Thirteenth (trade paperback) (2009)

NOTE: The Darkness (10), The Shadows (11), and The Thirteenth (12)
are called The Armageddon Finale to The Vampire Huntress (trademark)
Legend Series.

Crimson Moon Novels

  1. Bad Blood (2008)
  2. Bite The Bullet (2008)
  3. Undead on Arrival (2009)
  4. Cursed to Death (2009)
  5. Never Cry Werewolf (2010)
  6. Left for Undead (2010)

Dark Avengers Series

  1. Finders Keepers (2008)
  2. Loser’s Weepers (2008)

Paranormal novellas

  • Stroke Of Midnight (et al.) (2004) (*)

(New York Times bestseller extended list 2004)

  • Dark Dreams (edited by Brandon Massey) (2004) (*)
  • Voices From the Other Side: Dark Dreams 2 (edited by Brandon Massey) (2006) (*)
  • Love at First Bite (et al.) (2006) (*)
  • My Big Fat Supernatural Wedding (edited by P.N. Elrod) (2006) (*)
  • Vegas Bites (et al.) (2006) (*)
  • Creepin’ (edited by Monica Jackson) (2007) (*)
  • Dark Delicacies 2 (et al.) (2007) (*)
  • On the Line (et al.) (2007) (*)
  • Hotter Than Hell (edited by Kim Harrison) (2008) (*)
  • The Darker Mask (edited by Gary Phillips and Christopher Chambers (2008) (*)
  • The Ancestors (et al.) (2008) (*)

(*) Indicates story was featured in an anthology.

To see more of who died in 2011 click here


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