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Archive for May 14, 2012

1 person got busted onSeptember 3, 2011


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4 people got busted on September 2, 2011


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1 person got busted onSeptember 1, 2011


James M. Flinchum, American journalist died he was , 94.

James Maxwell Flinchum, Jr. , known as Jim Flinchum, was from 1961 until his retirement in 1985 the editor-in-chief of the Wyoming State Tribune, one of two forerunners of the existing Wyoming Tribune Eagle in Cheyenne, Wyoming died he was , 94..

(November 5, 1916 – August 2, 2011)

Early years

Flinchum was born in Caddo in Bryan County in southern Oklahoma. In 1939, Flinchum obtained a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Oklahoma at Norman. For two years he was the editor of The Norman Transcript prior to joining the United Press wire service. During World War II, he was through 1945 a United States Army platoon leader and officer in the Pacific theater based in the Philippines. He won the Bronze Star. After the war, Flinchum returned to United Press, where he was based first in Little Rock, Arkansas. Thereafter, he was stationed in Denver, Colorado and Dallas and Houston, Texas.[1]

Journalist in Cheyenne

Considered a demanding journalist with an encyclopedic knowledge of
public affairs, Flinchum pushed his reporters to excel and rejected
incomplete stories. He had difficulty when the newsroom was converted
from typewriters to computers but persisted with hard-hitting editorials
for the Wyoming State Tribune.[2]
A Republican, Flinchum stayed active in local politics after his retirement from the Tribune Eagle
through the interest group, Citizens Opposing Spendthrift Taxation.
Jack Quirk of Cheyenne, the president of the group, said that he and
Flinchum talked weekly even as the former editor lost his eyesight.[2]
Jim Angell, executive director of the Wyoming Press Association and a former reporter for the Associated Press,
describes Flinchum as “fair” in his editing and writing. Angell refers
to Flinchum as an old-school journalist who stressed the facts and
accurate reporting: “He was a legend in the community.”[2]
Flinchum was active in the YMCA and Rotary International.[1] In 1971, he wrote a short article in Field and Stream magazine highlighting the many fishing waters of Wyoming.[3]

Death

Flinchum died in Cheyenne at the age of ninety-four. He was survived
by his wife, the former Nancy Reynolds of Cheyenne, whom he married in
1948, and two daughters, Nancy Prosser and her husband, Edward Riner Prosser, of Cheyenne, a Republican former member of the Wyoming House of Representatives, and Suzy Deger and her husband, Tim, of Franktown, Colorado; two grandchildren, Jackie Parker and husband, Todd, of Colbert, Georgia and Brent Prosser and wife, Dana, of Grand Junction, Colorado, and five great-grandchildren.[1]
Graveside services were held on August 6 at Lakeview Cemetery in Cheyenne.[1]

 

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Al Federoff, American baseball player (Detroit Tigers) died he was , 87.

Alfred Federoff , nicknamed “Whitey,” was an American professional baseball infielder and manager died he was , 87.. He spent his career in minor league baseball, except for 76 games spread over the 1951 and 1952 seasons, when he was a member of the Detroit Tigers of Major League Baseball.

(July 11, 1924 – August 2, 2011)

Federoff graduated from high school in Etna, Pennsylvania, and attended Duquesne University for two years.[3]
He threw and batted right-handed, stood 5 feet 11 inches (1.8 m) tall
and weighed 165 pounds (75 kg) as an active player. His playing career
extended from 1946 through 1959, with another decade spent as a minor
league manager (1960–61; 1963–70). Most of his career was spent with the
Tigers: he signed with Detroit in 1946, played for seven seasons in
their farm system,
and then managed in that system for nine more years during the 1960s.
As a skipper, his teams won two league championships. He was a Tigers’ scout in 1962.
For the MLB Tigers in 1951–52, Federoff played 71 games as a second baseman and batted .238 in 235 at bats, with no home runs and 14 runs batted in. He was a .279 hitter during his minor league career, where he saw service with the Triple-A Toledo Mud Hens, Buffalo Bisons and Louisville Colonels, and the Open Classification San Diego Padres and Seattle Rainiers.[4]

 

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DeLois Barrett Campbell, American gospel singer (The Barrett Sisters), died from pulmonary embolism he was , 85.

Delois Barrett Campbell

(March 12, 1926 –
August 2, 2011)

 Delois Barrett Campbell , began her career as the lead singer of the world famous
Roberta Martin Singers
while still in high school. As a member of Roberta Martin Singers,
DeLois traveled around the United States and the world singing for the
Lord, but she soon placed her career on hold to started her family.
DeLois became a mother and a pastor’s wife.

Recent years

DeLois Barrett Campbell died August 2, 2011. She was 85.[2]
She had been wheelchair bound for years. In late 2009, she lost her
voice and could not sing anymore but she was still present during some
of the concerts with a microphone in her hand. She had battled arthritis
and other health issues.[3]
The other sisters are still performing, recording, and serving the
Lord. Their most recent release is on I AM Records and is entitled “What
A Wonderful World.” DeLois had her last annual birthday concert
celebration at First Church of Deliverance in Chicago, that included
performances with her sisters Billie and Rodessa.

The Barrett Sisters are an American award-winning gospel trio from Chicago, Illinois. The trio consisted of sisters DeLois Barrett Campbell, Billie Barrett GreenBey and Rodessa Barrett Porter. They have been singing together for more than 40 years.

History

The Barrett Sisters grew up in poverty in Chicago, Illinois. They had seven siblings. Four of their siblings died from tuberculosis.[1]
They were raised by strict spiritual parents. They were not allowed to
listen to blues music. In 1930s, the three sisters began singing gospel
with their cousin, and their vocal coach was their aunt Mattie Dacus.
Like many of their cohorts, they thought that the only hope for a music
career; they would have to enter into the secular world. But The Barrett Sisters knew that would deeply hurt their parents, who believed that secular music had no place in the lives of the saved.
In the mid-1960s, the sisters regrouped to record their first album on the Savoy Records,
“Jesus Loves Me,” on which they recorded Sam Cooke’s “Wonderful”. They
followed with “I’ll Fly Away” and “Carry Me Back” where they were joined
with Roberta Martin on “I Hear God”. Ms. Martin sang lead on the title
track. Since then, The Barrett Sisters have become one of the world
famous female gospel groups. They have performed at countless churches
and in many respected concert halls including the Lincoln Center in NYC,
Constitution Hall in Washington, DC, Orchestra Hall in Chicago, and
Theatre-DeVille in Paris, France. The Barrett Sisters have toured
internationally over thirty times. In the 70’s they recorded two albums
for Nashboro’s subsidiary label Creed: “God So Loved The World” and
“Coming Again So Soon”. Ms. Campbell followed with a solo album also on
Creed called “Through It All”.
The Barrett Sisters represented the United States in Africa, as
Goodwill Ambassadors of 1983, and in the South Pacific for six week in
1987. They have also performed for several notable leaders including the
King of Sweden and the President of Zaire, Africa. The Barrett Sisters
are associated with numerous celebrities and big names in entertainment
including the late Queen of Gospel Albertina Walker, Thomas A. Dorsey (National Singers Convention), Rev. James Cleveland, Andre Crouch, The Mighty Clouds of Joy, Shirley Caesar, The Winans, Willie Mae Ford Smith and Patti LaBelle.

Radio, television, and film

The Barrett Sisters made their first appearance on radio and
television in the 1960s. They have appeared on “The Tonight Show with
Johnny Carson,” “The Oprah Winfrey Show,””Bobby Jones Show,” “Living the
Dream,” a television tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, PBS special
“Going Home to Gospel with Patti LaBelle,” along with Gospel Queen Albertina Walker,
and the “PTL Club.” They’ve been featured several times on the locally
produced Emmy Award winning “Jubilee Showcase.” They have appeared on The Stellar Awards, which included accepting 2009 Walgreens’ Ambassador Bobby Jones Legend Award.
In 1982, The Barrett Sisters were featured in the critically acclaimed documentary “Say Amen, Somebody,” which features Willie Mae Ford Smith, Sallie Martin, Thomas A. Dorsey, The O’Neal Twins, and Zella Jackson Price. They were also featured on the soundtrack.

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Ralph Berkowitz, American composer died he was , 100.

Ralph Berkowitz  was an American composer, classical musician, and painter.

(September 5, 1910 – August 2, 2011)

Biography

Berkowitz was born in Brooklyn, New York to a Romanian Jewish couple, Matilda and William Berkowitz who had emigrated from Roman and Bucharest. His father was instrumental in shaping young Ralph’s musical culture and experience.[3] In 1927, he enrolled at the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia where he later became a member of the teaching staff.[4] In 1940, he became accompanist for Gregor Piatigorsky, with whom he appeared until the cellist’s death in 1976. Other musical partners included the tenor Jan Peerce, cellist Felix Salmond, and violinist and composer George Enescu. He recorded extensively with Piatigorsky and others, including the violinist Eudice Shapiro.
From 1946 to 1951, Berkowitz served as an executive assistant to Serge Koussevitzky at Tanglewood
and later became Dean of the Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood in
1951, a position he held until 1961. As Dean, he presided over a faculty
that included Aaron Copland, Leonard Bernstein, and many others. Illustrious students in those years included Zubin Mehta, Lorin Maazel and Claudio Abbado.
He, along with Boston Symphony manager Todd Perry, was largely
instrumental in keeping the Tanglewood Festival alive following
Koussevitsky’s death.
Berkowitz has been widely published as an arranger and composer. His A Telephone Call, for singer and orchestra is his most extended work.
In 1961 Berkowitz moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico,
where he lived until his death in 2011. He first came to Albuquerque in
1940 to serve as a guest artist with a chamber music series called The
June Music Festival. He remained active as an artist for the Festival
into the 1980s. Berkowitz became manager of the then Albuquerque Civic
Orchestra (now New Mexico Symphony Orchestra) when he moved to New
Mexico and served until 1968, seeing the Orchestra through its move to
its current home—Popejoy Hall at the University of New Mexico.
Berkowitz commissioned Daron Hagen
to compose one of his most intellectually rigorous works, a set of
Piano Variations based on a theme made up of pitches derived from
Berkowitz’s and Hagen’s names, in 2002. The work is available from Carl Fischer. Berkowitz reached his centenary in September 2010[5] and died in August of the following year.

Discography

  • “RCA Red Seal Century – Soloists & Conductors”, 2 CD / RCA Records / 2001-10-23
  • “Stravinsky: Petroushka Suite; Toch: Violin Sonata”, 1 CD / Crystal Records / 1998-01-02 [6]

 

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Baruj Benacerraf, Venezuelan-born American immunologist, Nobel laureate (1980) died he was , 90.

Clarence Ellsworth Miller, Jr. was a Republican Congressman from Ohio, serving January 3, 1967 to January 3, 1993 died from pneumonia he was , 93..
He was born in Lancaster, Ohio,
one of six children of an electrician father. After graduating from
high school, he enrolled in correspondence school and became a certified
electrical engineer. He worked for Columbia Gas and held patents
related to the pumping of gas.[1]
Miller was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1966 to
represent a section of southeastern Ohio where, in Lancaster, he had
served as mayor. During the Persian Gulf War, he was reportedly the only
member of Congress who had a grandson (Drew Miller, of Lancaster, Ohio)
fighting in that conflict.[1]
By training, he was an engineer, and the Almanac of American Politics
wrote that Mr. Miller approached politics with the “precise and orderly
manner” that one might expect from someone of his profession.

(November 1, 1917 – August 2, 2011)

US Patents

U.S. Patent 3,088,655,
Filed August 1, 1960, Patented May 7, 1963 “Remote Control and Alarm
System For A Compressor Station and Compressor Engines Thereof”
U.S. Patent 3,210,582, Filed July 26. 1960, Patented Oct. 5, 1965 “Magneto Having Auxiliary Pole Piece”

Elections

In 1966, the Tenth Congressional District elected Miller to the Ninetieth Congress, defeating incumbent Democrat Walter H. Moeller, and he was re-elected to twelve succeeding Congresses.
Miller was a 13-term Ohio Republican nicknamed “Five Percent
Clarence” for his persistent efforts to cut spending bills by that
amount. He did not cultivate publicity, preferring instead to focus on
legislation more than on the Washington talk-show circuit. He was known
for his near-perfect attendance on votes no matter how minute. In 1990,
the Capitol Hill publication Roll Call named Mr. Miller the “most
obscure” member of Congress. It was intended as a compliment,
considering that grandstanders never would have received such an honor. A
fiscal conservative, he served on the House Appropriations Committee.
The numerous bills he introduced, often unsuccessfully, aimed to cut
spending measures—if not by the 5 percent figure in his nickname, then
at least by 2 percent. In 1977, he succeeded in persuading House
colleagues to cut foreign aid by 5 percent.[1]
He lost his bid for reelection in the 1992 primary after redistricting. [1]

Elections by landslide


In his younger years.

Twelve of the thirteen elections won by Mr. Miller were by a margin of victory of greater than 25%.

Heated 1992 primary

Ohio lost two seats in the 1990 reapportionment. The Democrats and Republicans in the Ohio General Assembly
struck a deal to eliminate one Democratic and one Republican district,
as one congressman from each party was expected to retire. The
Republican expected to retire was Miller, but he announced he would run
again. The Democrats in the Statehouse would not reconsider the deal and
so Miller’s Tenth District was obliterated. (The new Tenth was in Cuyahoga County.)
The new district map was not agreed upon by the General Assembly
until March 26, 1992, one week before the filing deadline for the
primary originally scheduled for May 5. (Governor George Voinovich
signed the new map into law on March 27, and the General Assembly moved
the primary to June 2 on April 1.) Miller’s own hometown was placed in
freshman David Hobson‘s Seventh District, but Miller chose to run in the Sixth District against Bob McEwen;
only one of the twelve counties in Miller’s old Tenth District was in
the new Seventh but the largest piece of his old district, five
counties, was placed in the new Sixth. Miller also had a strong distaste
for McEwen, a Hillsboro Republican in his sixth term who had been elected to Congress at age thirty.
Despite being hurt in a fall in his bathtub after slipping on a bar
of soap, an injury that led Republicans to expect his withdrawal, Miller
stayed in the race. A deal was hoped for as late as May 15, the day
Miller was scheduled to hold a press conference Ohio political observers
thought he would use to announce his withdrawal, but Miller stayed in
the race and the two incumbents faced each other in the Republican
primary on June 2, 1992.
McEwen, who Congressional Quarterly’s Politics in America pronounced “invincible”, was caught up in the House banking scandal, which had been seized upon by Newt Gingrich, a like-minded conservative House Republican, as an example of the corruption of Congress. Martin Gottlieb of the Dayton Daily News
said “McEwen was collateral damage” to Gingrich’s crusade. McEwen
initially denied bouncing any checks. Later, he admitted he had bounced a
few. Then when the full totals were released by Ethics Committee
investigators, the number was revealed to have been 166 over
thirty-nine months. McEwen said that he always had funds available to
cover the alleged overdrafts, pointing to the policy of the House
sergeant at arms, who ran the House bank, paying checks on an overdrawn
account if it would not exceed the sum of the Representative’s next
paycheck. In 1991, McEwen had also been criticized for his use of the franking privilege
and his frequent trips overseas at taxpayer expense, but McEwen
defended the trips as part of his work on the Intelligence Committee and
in building relationships with legislatures overseas.
The primary race was bitter. Miller called McEwen “Pinocchio
and McEwen said of Miller “his misrepresentations and falsehoods are
gargantuan. I tried to be his best friend in the delegation. I am deeply
disappointed at the meanness of his effort.” Tom Deimer of Cleveland’s Plain Dealer
wrote that the two candidates were largely identical on the issues:
“both are textbook Republican conservatives, opposed to abortion, gun
control, high taxes, and costly government programs — unless located in
their districts.” Miller noted he had no overdrafts, saying, “the score
is 166 to nothing” referring to the number of checks McEwen bounced in
the House banking scandal.
The 1992 primary was so close it forced a recount and a lawsuit. When Ohio Secretary of State Bob Taft dismissed Miller’s charges of voting irregularities in Highland, Hocking, and Warren Counties, Miller filed suit in the Ohio Supreme Court.
Only in August did Miller drop his court challenge and then only
because his campaign was out of money. In the final count, McEwen won
33,219 votes to Miller’s 32,922, a plurality of only 297 votes.
Ominously for November, each had won the counties they had formerly
represented, McEwen making little headway in the new eastern counties in
the district. After the final result, Miller refused to endorse McEwen
and carried an unsuccessful legal challenge to the redistricting to the United States Supreme Court,
insisting district lines should be drawn on a politically neutral
basis. After the primary, McEwen introduced H. R. 5727 in the House to
name the locks on the Ohio near Gallipolis after Miller, but the bill did not pass.[2] McEwen subsequently lost the general election that year to Ted Strickland.

Family

His wife of 51 years, the former Helen Brown, died in 1987. The
couple had two children, Ronald K. Miller of Lancaster and Jacqueline M.
Williams of Cincinnati; five grandchildren; and nine
great-grandchildren.[1]

Death

Clarence Miller returned to Lancaster, where he resided at the time of his death on August 2, 2011, aged 93.

 

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Clarence E. Miller, American politician, U.S. Representative from Ohio (1967–1993), died from pneumonia he was ,

Clarence Ellsworth Miller, Jr. was a Republican Congressman from Ohio, serving January 3, 1967 to January 3, 1993 died from pneumonia he was , 93..
He was born in Lancaster, Ohio,
one of six children of an electrician father. After graduating from
high school, he enrolled in correspondence school and became a certified
electrical engineer. He worked for Columbia Gas and held patents
related to the pumping of gas.[1]
Miller was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1966 to
represent a section of southeastern Ohio where, in Lancaster, he had
served as mayor. During the Persian Gulf War, he was reportedly the only
member of Congress who had a grandson (Drew Miller, of Lancaster, Ohio)
fighting in that conflict.[1]
By training, he was an engineer, and the Almanac of American Politics
wrote that Mr. Miller approached politics with the “precise and orderly
manner” that one might expect from someone of his profession.

(November 1, 1917 – August 2, 2011)

US Patents

U.S. Patent 3,088,655,
Filed August 1, 1960, Patented May 7, 1963 “Remote Control and Alarm
System For A Compressor Station and Compressor Engines Thereof”
U.S. Patent 3,210,582, Filed July 26. 1960, Patented Oct. 5, 1965 “Magneto Having Auxiliary Pole Piece”

Elections

In 1966, the Tenth Congressional District elected Miller to the Ninetieth Congress, defeating incumbent Democrat Walter H. Moeller, and he was re-elected to twelve succeeding Congresses.
Miller was a 13-term Ohio Republican nicknamed “Five Percent
Clarence” for his persistent efforts to cut spending bills by that
amount. He did not cultivate publicity, preferring instead to focus on
legislation more than on the Washington talk-show circuit. He was known
for his near-perfect attendance on votes no matter how minute. In 1990,
the Capitol Hill publication Roll Call named Mr. Miller the “most
obscure” member of Congress. It was intended as a compliment,
considering that grandstanders never would have received such an honor. A
fiscal conservative, he served on the House Appropriations Committee.
The numerous bills he introduced, often unsuccessfully, aimed to cut
spending measures—if not by the 5 percent figure in his nickname, then
at least by 2 percent. In 1977, he succeeded in persuading House
colleagues to cut foreign aid by 5 percent.[1]
He lost his bid for reelection in the 1992 primary after redistricting. [1]

Elections by landslide


In his younger years.

Twelve of the thirteen elections won by Mr. Miller were by a margin of victory of greater than 25%.

Heated 1992 primary

Ohio lost two seats in the 1990 reapportionment. The Democrats and Republicans in the Ohio General Assembly
struck a deal to eliminate one Democratic and one Republican district,
as one congressman from each party was expected to retire. The
Republican expected to retire was Miller, but he announced he would run
again. The Democrats in the Statehouse would not reconsider the deal and
so Miller’s Tenth District was obliterated. (The new Tenth was in Cuyahoga County.)
The new district map was not agreed upon by the General Assembly
until March 26, 1992, one week before the filing deadline for the
primary originally scheduled for May 5. (Governor George Voinovich
signed the new map into law on March 27, and the General Assembly moved
the primary to June 2 on April 1.) Miller’s own hometown was placed in
freshman David Hobson‘s Seventh District, but Miller chose to run in the Sixth District against Bob McEwen;
only one of the twelve counties in Miller’s old Tenth District was in
the new Seventh but the largest piece of his old district, five
counties, was placed in the new Sixth. Miller also had a strong distaste
for McEwen, a Hillsboro Republican in his sixth term who had been elected to Congress at age thirty.
Despite being hurt in a fall in his bathtub after slipping on a bar
of soap, an injury that led Republicans to expect his withdrawal, Miller
stayed in the race. A deal was hoped for as late as May 15, the day
Miller was scheduled to hold a press conference Ohio political observers
thought he would use to announce his withdrawal, but Miller stayed in
the race and the two incumbents faced each other in the Republican
primary on June 2, 1992.
McEwen, who Congressional Quarterly’s Politics in America pronounced “invincible”, was caught up in the House banking scandal, which had been seized upon by Newt Gingrich, a like-minded conservative House Republican, as an example of the corruption of Congress. Martin Gottlieb of the Dayton Daily News
said “McEwen was collateral damage” to Gingrich’s crusade. McEwen
initially denied bouncing any checks. Later, he admitted he had bounced a
few. Then when the full totals were released by Ethics Committee
investigators, the number was revealed to have been 166 over
thirty-nine months. McEwen said that he always had funds available to
cover the alleged overdrafts, pointing to the policy of the House
sergeant at arms, who ran the House bank, paying checks on an overdrawn
account if it would not exceed the sum of the Representative’s next
paycheck. In 1991, McEwen had also been criticized for his use of the franking privilege
and his frequent trips overseas at taxpayer expense, but McEwen
defended the trips as part of his work on the Intelligence Committee and
in building relationships with legislatures overseas.
The primary race was bitter. Miller called McEwen “Pinocchio
and McEwen said of Miller “his misrepresentations and falsehoods are
gargantuan. I tried to be his best friend in the delegation. I am deeply
disappointed at the meanness of his effort.” Tom Deimer of Cleveland’s Plain Dealer
wrote that the two candidates were largely identical on the issues:
“both are textbook Republican conservatives, opposed to abortion, gun
control, high taxes, and costly government programs — unless located in
their districts.” Miller noted he had no overdrafts, saying, “the score
is 166 to nothing” referring to the number of checks McEwen bounced in
the House banking scandal.
The 1992 primary was so close it forced a recount and a lawsuit. When Ohio Secretary of State Bob Taft dismissed Miller’s charges of voting irregularities in Highland, Hocking, and Warren Counties, Miller filed suit in the Ohio Supreme Court.
Only in August did Miller drop his court challenge and then only
because his campaign was out of money. In the final count, McEwen won
33,219 votes to Miller’s 32,922, a plurality of only 297 votes.
Ominously for November, each had won the counties they had formerly
represented, McEwen making little headway in the new eastern counties in
the district. After the final result, Miller refused to endorse McEwen
and carried an unsuccessful legal challenge to the redistricting to the United States Supreme Court,
insisting district lines should be drawn on a politically neutral
basis. After the primary, McEwen introduced H. R. 5727 in the House to
name the locks on the Ohio near Gallipolis after Miller, but the bill did not pass.[2] McEwen subsequently lost the general election that year to Ted Strickland.

Family

His wife of 51 years, the former Helen Brown, died in 1987. The
couple had two children, Ronald K. Miller of Lancaster and Jacqueline M.
Williams of Cincinnati; five grandchildren; and nine
great-grandchildren.[1]

Death

Clarence Miller returned to Lancaster, where he resided at the time of his death on August 2, 2011, aged 93.

 

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Leslie Esdaile Banks, American author (The Vampire Huntress Legend Series), died from adrenal cancer she was , 51

Leslie Esdaile Banks, née Peterson  was an American writer under the pennames of Leslie Esdaile, Leslie E. Banks, Leslie Banks, Leslie Esdaile Banks and L. A. Banks died from adrenal cancer she was , 51. She wrote in various genres, including African American literature, romance, women’s fiction, crime suspense, dark fantasy/horror and non-fiction.
She won several literary awards, including the 2008 Essence Literary Awards Storyteller of the Year.


(December 11, 1959 – August 2, 2011)

Biography

Leslie Ann Peterson was born and raised in Philadelphia. She married
Michael Eslaide, and they had a daughter, she remarried with Al Banks in
2000.
She contributed to magazines, newspaper columns, and wrote commercial
fiction for five major publishers: St. Martin’s Press (NYC), Simon and Schuster (NYC), Kensington Publishing (NYC), BET/Arabesque (NYC), and Genesis Press (MS).[4]
Books 1 and 2 of The Vampire Huntress Legend Series (Minion and The Awakening, respectively), have been optioned for Hollywood films by GothamBeach Entertainment and Griot Entertainment. Originally a nine book series, The Vampire Huntress Legend Series has now been expanded to twelve books (the last being called “The Thirteenth”).[5]
She was a founding partner of The Liars Club, a networking group of
professional in publishing and other aspects of entertainment.

Illness and death

In June 2011 it was announced on Banks’ website that she had been
diagnosed with late stage adrenal cancer. It was revealed that due to
the extreme costs of her medical care, her family opened up a charitable
fund in her name in one of the local Pennsylvania banks. The literary
community also rallied around the ailing author, with several supporters
starting a series of auctions where the proceeds went towards Banks’
medical care. [6][7] Many well known people such as bestselling authors P.N. Elrod, Heather Graham and Charlaine Harris donated books and services, as would others in the literary community. [8] On August 2, 2011, the official website of L.A. Banks was updated to reflect her death.
Leslie Ann Peterson Esdaile Banks died on August 2, 2011, aged 51.[9] She is survived by her daughter.

Bibliography

As Leslie Esdaile

Romance novels

  • Sundance (1996)
  • Slow Burn (1997)
  • Love Notes (2001)
  • Love Lessons (2001)
  • River of Souls (2001)
  • Love Potions (2002)
  • Still Waters Run Deep (2002)
  • Tomorrow’s Promise (2002)
  • Through the Storm (2002)
  • Sister Got Game (2004)
  • Keepin’ It Real (2005)
  • Take Me There (2006)
  • Better Than (June 2008)

Romance novellas

  • “Home For The Holidays” in Midnight Clear (et al.) (2000) (*)
  • “Time Enough for Love” in After the Vows (et al.) (2001) (*)
  • “Valentine’s Love” in Candlelight and You (et al.) (2003) (*)
  • “Shameless” in Sisterhood of Shopaholics (et al.) (2003) (*)
  • “A ‘No Drama’ Valentine’s” in Valentin’s Day is Killing Me (et al.) (2006) (*)

Alexis Grant

Men of the Delta Force Series

  • Sizzle & Burn
  • Locked at Loaded

Non-Fiction

  • How To Write A Romance For The New Market (1999) (*)

As Leslie E. Banks

Romance novels

  • Soul Food: For Better, For Worse (2002)
  • Soul Food: Through Thick and Thin (2003)

As Leslie Banks

Non-Fiction

  • “Light at the End of the Tunnel” in Chicken Soup for the African American Soul (2004) (*)

As Leslie Esdaile Banks

Crime/Suspense

  • Betrayal of the Trust (2004)
  • Blind Trust (2005)
  • Shattered Trust (2006)
  • No Trust (final book) (September 2007)

As L. A. Banks

Crime/Suspense

  • Scarface, The Beginning, Volume 1 (2006)
  • Scarface, Point of No Return, Volume 2 (TBD)

Paranormal

The Vampire Huntress Legend Series

  1. Minion (trade paperback) (2003) (mass market) (2004)
  2. The Awakening (trade paperback) (2004) (mass market) (2004)
  3. The Hunted (trade paperback) (2004) (mass market) (2005)
  4. The Bitten(trade paperback) (2005) (mass market) (2005)
  5. The Forbidden (trade paperback) (2005) (mass market) (2006)
  6. The Damned (trade paperback) (2006) (mass market) (2007)
  7. The Forsaken (trade paperback) (2006) (mass market) (2007)
  8. The Wicked (trade paperback) (2007) (mass market) (2008)
  9. The Cursed (trade paperback) (2007) (mass market) (2008)
  10. The Darkness (trade paperback) (2008) (mass market) (2008)
  11. The Shadows (trade paperback) (2008) (Book 11) (2009)
  12. The Thirteenth (trade paperback) (2009)

NOTE: The Darkness (10), The Shadows (11), and The Thirteenth (12)
are called The Armageddon Finale to The Vampire Huntress (trademark)
Legend Series.

Crimson Moon Novels

  1. Bad Blood (2008)
  2. Bite The Bullet (2008)
  3. Undead on Arrival (2009)
  4. Cursed to Death (2009)
  5. Never Cry Werewolf (2010)
  6. Left for Undead (2010)

Dark Avengers Series

  1. Finders Keepers (2008)
  2. Loser’s Weepers (2008)

Paranormal novellas

  • Stroke Of Midnight (et al.) (2004) (*)

(New York Times bestseller extended list 2004)

  • Dark Dreams (edited by Brandon Massey) (2004) (*)
  • Voices From the Other Side: Dark Dreams 2 (edited by Brandon Massey) (2006) (*)
  • Love at First Bite (et al.) (2006) (*)
  • My Big Fat Supernatural Wedding (edited by P.N. Elrod) (2006) (*)
  • Vegas Bites (et al.) (2006) (*)
  • Creepin’ (edited by Monica Jackson) (2007) (*)
  • Dark Delicacies 2 (et al.) (2007) (*)
  • On the Line (et al.) (2007) (*)
  • Hotter Than Hell (edited by Kim Harrison) (2008) (*)
  • The Darker Mask (edited by Gary Phillips and Christopher Chambers (2008) (*)
  • The Ancestors (et al.) (2008) (*)

(*) Indicates story was featured in an anthology.

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Allan Watkins, Welsh cricketer, died after a short illness he was , 89

Allan Watkins , born Albert John Watkins, was a Welsh cricketer, who played for England in fifteen Tests from 1948 to 1952 died after a short illness he was , 89.. He toured India and Pakistan in 1951–52 with the MCC, and also participated in the 1955–56 ‘A’ Tour to Pakistan. In 1953–54, he played with the Commonwealth team in India and Pakistan, returning home early through injury.

(21 April 1922 – 3 August 2011)

Life and career

Born in Usk, Monmouthshire,[1] Watkins made his debut for Glamorgan just three weeks after his seventeenth birthday in 1939, as World War II loomed. He was an all-rounder,
being a left-handed batsman, a medium to fast left-arm bowler and a
brilliant close fielder, particularly at backward short leg.[1]
He was the first Glamorgan cricketer to score a century in Tests for
England, and played for the county until 1961, when he was 39 years old.
He was voted ‘Indian Cricket Cricketer of the Year’ in 1951–52, after
a successful series there with the MCC. During that tour, Watkins
battled his way to a nine hour long, unbeaten 137, in Delhi,
his best Test score. Oddly, Watkins’ better performances were overseas,
as his five home Tests did not provide a single innings above fifty.[1]
Watkins went on to successfully coach school cricket, most notably at Oundle School and Framlingham College.
He also played football for Cardiff City and Plymouth Argyle.[2] He died in Kidderminster, Worcestershire on 3 August 2011, following a short illness.[3]

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Mohsen Koochebaghi Tabrizi, Iranian Shi’ite Muslim marja, died from a heart attack he was , 87

Grand Ayatollah Mirza Mohsen Koochebaghi Tabrizi  was an Iranian Twelver Shi’a Marja  died from a heart attack he was , 87 ..

(9 January 1924 – 3 August 2011)

Early life

Tabrizi was born on 9 January 1924 in Tabriz, Iran. His father, Ayatollah Mirza Abbas Kochebaghi was also an Grand Ayatollah. He was studied in seminaries of Najaf, Iraq under Grand Ayatollah Abul-Qassim al-Khoei [3] and Mirza Fataah Shahidi Tabrizi.[4]

Social works

He was famous for his religious careers in Tabriz. He was Friday Prayers Imam of Jameh Mosque of Tabriz for years.

Books

  • Adiye A’mal Haj (1958)
  • Adiye Namaz Shab (1961)
  • Makaseb Ayatollah Shahidi (1969)
  • Basaer Ol-Darajat (1974)
  • A’mal Haj va Madine (1979)
  • Shafie Ol-Maznabin (1988)
  • Ojobat Ol-Astefaat (1995)
  • Hashiye Bar Orve (2007)
  • Borhan Alal Vojod Emam Zaman (2010)

Death

He died on 3 August 2011 in his house after a heart attack. His
funeral was held on 4 August 2011 and he was buried in Vadi Rahmat of Tabriz.[5]

 

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Bubba Smith, American football player (Baltimore Colts) and actor (Police Academy) died he was , 66.

 Charles Aaron “Bubba” Smith  was an American professional football player who became an actor after his retirement from the sport. He first came into prominence at Michigan State University, where he twice earned All-American honors as a defensive end on the Spartans football team. He had a major role in a 10–10 draw with Notre Dame in 1966 that was billed as “The Game of the Century.” He was one of only three players to have his jersey number retired by the program. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1988.[1]
He played nine years in the National Football League (NFL) with the Baltimore Colts (19671971), Oakland Raiders (19731974) and Houston Oilers (19751976). The first selection of the 1967 NFL Draft, he was the Colts’ starting left defensive end for five seasons who played in Super Bowls III and V, the latter with the winning side. He was named to two Pro Bowls and was a First-Team All-Pro in 1971.[2] Despite being 6 feet 7 inches (2.01 meters) tall and weighing 265 pounds (120.20 kilograms),[3] his tremendous speed and quickness usually caused him to draw two blockers.[2]
During his acting career, he mainly specialized in comedic roles in films, television advertisements and programs. For about a decade following his retirement from football, he appeared in various commercials for Miller Lite. His best-known role was as Moses Hightower in the first six Police Academy movies.[4]

 (February 28, 1945 – August 3, 2011)

Early life

Smith was born on February 28, 1945 in Orange, Texas, and raised in nearby Beaumont. His father was Willie Ray Smith Sr., a football coach who accumulated 235 victories in a career spent at three high schools in the Beaumont area. It was at Charlton-Pollard High School in Beaumont where the son got to play for the father.[2] The younger Smith developed into one of the state’s best-ever high school football players.[5]

Football career

College

Smith originally had hopes of playing college football at the University of Texas. Even though Longhorns head coach Darrell Royal was willing to offer him an athletic scholarship, he was prohibited from doing so because of the prevalent racial segregation throughout the Southern United States. At the time, Texas was a member of the Southwest Conference (SWC), which finally integrated
in 1967. The university’s football program did not do likewise until
three years later in 1970. The situation motivated Smith to become a
much better player.[5]
Smith played college football at Michigan State University. He was awarded with All-America honors in 1965 and 1966. Smith was a popular athlete at Michigan State, with the popular fan chant of “Kill, Bubba, Kill.”
His final game at Michigan State was a 10–10 draw with Notre Dame at Spartan Stadium on November 19, 1966.[6] It was hyped as “The Game of the Century
because both teams were undefeated, untied and ranked atop the national
polls entering the contest (Notre Dame was #1 at 8–0–0, Michigan State
#2 at 9–0–0).[7] Early in the first quarter, Smith tackled Fighting Irish starting quarterback Terry Hanratty, who suffered a separated left shoulder on the play. Hanratty was replaced for the remainder of the match by Coley O’Brien.
Smith, who admitted that Hanratty’s injury actually backfired on the
Spartans, stated, “That didn’t help us any. It just let them put in that
O’Brien who’s slippery and faster and gave us more trouble. The other
guy just sits there and waits, and that’s what we wanted.”[8] Michigan State finished second behind Notre Dame in the voting for the National Championship.[7]
In 1988, Smith was enshrined in the College Football Hall of Fame.
Michigan State retired his number 95 jersey on September 23, 2006,
prior to the Spartans’ home game against Notre Dame, amid repeated
cheers of his old slogan from the student section. This game also
celebrated the 40th anniversary of the “Game of the Century.”

Professional

Smith spent nine seasons in the NFL as a defensive end. He was the first overall selection in the 1967 NFL draft, chosen by the Baltimore Colts. The Colts won Super Bowl V at the end of the 1970 season, earning Smith his only Super Bowl ring.
However, in interviews, Smith stated that he would never wear the ring,
as it was seen as a “sloppy” game by many. He was traded to the Oakland Raiders before the 1972 season, and finished his career with the Houston Oilers. He was selected All-Pro one year, All-Conference two years, and went to two Pro Bowls.

Acting career

After leaving professional football, Smith began his acting career in small movie and television roles in the late 1970s and early 1980s. He is perhaps best known for his role as Moses Hightower in the Police Academy movie series, a role he reprised in all but one of the Police Academy sequels. Bubba appeared in the 1982 TV film Fighting Back: The Rocky Bleier Story. He was Arnold the driver in the 1983 movie Stroker Ace that cast stars such as Burt Reynolds, Ned Beatty, Jim Nabors, and Loni Anderson. He was a supporting character in the 1981 – 1982 flop Open All Night. He appeared in two episodes of the hit television series Married… with Children, once as the character “Spare Tire” Dixon and in a later episode as himself. He was the long time spokesman of Baltimore-area law firm Cohen, Snyder, Eisenberg & Katzenberg. Smith starred in the short-lived television series Blue Thunder, partnering with Pro Football Hall of Fame defensive star Dick Butkus, with whom he frequently costarred in advertisements for Miller Lite beer. Smith also appeared in Tales of the Gold Monkey, in the episode called “God Save the Queen”, along with fellow actor James Avery. He appeared on Good Times as Claude, a bodyguard/thug working for Marion “Sweet Daddy” Williams. He also appeared on an episode of The Odd Couple;when
asked by Oscar Madison what his most embarrassing moment was, he
replied, “When my mother named me ‘Bubba'”. Smith appeared in a 1982
Episode of Taxi
(Season 4 Episode 19) where Smith’s character played a football player
trying to get back into the NFL after being cut. He inspired Tony,
played by Tony Danza to train hard enough to earn his license back as a boxer. He also appeared on Macgyver (Season 7, Episode 10).

Personal life

Smith’s brother Tody Smith played for the University of Southern California and for the Dallas Cowboys, Houston Oilers and Buffalo Bills.

Death

Smith was found dead in his Los Angeles home by his caretaker on
August 3, 2011. He died from acute drug intoxication and heart disease. Phentermine,
a weight-loss drug was found in his system. His heart weighed more than
twice that of an average human heart. He was 66 years old.[9][10][11]

 

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Who is Jordin Brianna Sparks ?

Who is Jordin Brianna Sparks? The entertainment and music world knows her as Jordin Sparks. Sparks is an American pop/R&B singer-songwriter, model and actress from Glendale, Arizona who rose to fame as the winner of the sixth season of American Idol. Sparks won when she was 17 years old, making her the youngest winner in Idol history. She followed her American Idol victory with the release of her self-titled debut album in 2007, which has gone platinum in the U.S. and has sold over 2 million copies worldwide.[2] Sparks’ single, “No Air” is the highest selling single by any American Idol contestant, selling about 4 million digital copies worldwide.[3] Due to the success of her debut album and its four top 20 singles, she has received numerous awards and nominations including an American Music Award in 2008 and her first Grammy nomination in 2009.
Sparks’ second album Battlefield was released in July 2009 worldwide and debuted at #7 in the U.S., three spots higher than her first album. The album’s lead single, also titled “Battlefield“, peaked in the top 10 on the Billboard Hot 100, making it her third top 10 single and fifth consecutive top 20 single. Sparks is the only Idol contestant to have their first five singles reach the top 20 on the Billboard Hot 100. “Battlefield” has sold almost 2 million copies worldwide. Sparks has sold over 9 million singles worldwide to date, making her one of the most successful idol winners. Battlefield’s second single, “S.O.S. (Let the Music Play)“, was her first song to top the U.S. Billboard Hot Dance Club Play making it her first U.S. number one single.[4] Sparks followed her success in 2010 by making her debut on Broadway. Sparks starred as Nina Rosario in the Tony Award winning broadway musical, In The Heights.

Biography

Sparks was born December 22, 1989 in Phoenix, Arizona to Jodi Weidmann Sparks and former professional football player Phillippi Sparks. Sparks has a younger brother, Phillippi “PJ” Sparks, Jr., who plays football at Mountain Ridge High School. She grew up in the suburbs of Ridgewood, New Jersey, while her father played as a defensive back for the New York Giants. After living in New Jersey, Sparks attended Northwest Community Christian School in Phoenix through the eighth grade. Sparks attended Sandra Day O’Connor High School until 2006, when she was homeschooled to better concentrate on her singing.[5] Sparks is an evangelical Christian and attends Calvary Community Church in Phoenix. On her American Idol biography, she thanks her parents and God for her win.[6] She wears a purity ring that symbolizes her desire to remain a virgin until marriage. She won an award for best young artist of the year in Arizona for three years.
Before appearing on American Idol, Sparks participated in and won such talent competitions as Coca-Cola’s Rising Star, the Gospel Music Association Academy’s Overall Spotlight Award, America’s Most Talented Kids, Colgate Country Showdown, and the 2006 Drug Free AZ Superstar Search. Prior to Idol, Sparks frequently performed the national anthem at various local sporting events, notably for the Phoenix Suns, Arizona Cardinals, and Arizona Diamondbacks. Sparks also appeared with Alice Cooper in his 2004 Christmas show and toured with Christian contemporary singer Michael W. Smith in 2006. In 2006, Sparks was one of six winners of the Phoenix Torrid search for the “Next Plus Size Model”. She was flown to California, where she was used in a number of Torrid ads and promotional pieces.[7] A full-page ad for Torrid featuring Sparks ran in the December 2006 issue of Seventeen magazine.
On June 15th, 2011 Jordin had her first-ever bikini shoot for the cover of People Magazine Most Amazing Bodies issue. Jordin was interviewed by a couple media publications and when speaking about her weight loss and diet to Access Hollywood she says “My diet has pretty much remained the same, like if I want a piece of bread, I’m gonna have a piece of bread, but I’m making healthier decisions like instead of a bag of chips for a snack, I’ll see if I can find an apple, I’ve also upped my intake of vegetables and I’m drinking a lot more water.” [8][9][10]

American Idol

In the summer of 2006, Sparks auditioned twice for the sixth season of American Idol: once in Los Angeles (only auditioned for producers) and again in Seattle after winning Arizona Idol, a talent competition conducted by Phoenix Fox station KSAZ-TV. The Seattle audition is the one seen in the January 17, 2007 broadcast of American Idol, in which she earned a “gold ticket” and the right to appear in the Hollywood Round. American Idol judge Randy Jackson made the offhand prediction that, “Curly hair will win this year.”[11] While on the show, Sparks gained a loyal fan base known as “Sparkplugs”. On May 23, 2007, Sparks was crowned the winner of the sixth season of American Idol. She remains the youngest winner in American Idol history. Cowell said, “Jordin was the most improved over the whole season – didn’t start the best, but midway through this was the girl who suddenly got momentum.” He included that “Young girl, likeable, and the singer won over the entertainer [Lewis].”[12] Four selected songs Sparks had performed on American Idol, including the season’s coronation song, “This Is My Now“, were made available on her self-titled EP, released on May 22, 2007, the day before the grand finale.[13] The coronation song, “This Is My Now” peaked at number fifteen on the Billboard Hot 100, becoming Sparks’ first top fifteen hit on the chart.[14] The following summer, Sparks took part in the American Idols LIVE! Tour 2007 from July 6 to September 23, 2007 along with other contestants in the top ten.


Since her win in 2007, Sparks has returned to Idol five times. She performed twice on the seventh season of American Idol, once on the Idol Gives Back results show singing “No Air” with Chris Brown and again with “One Step at a Time” on May 21, 2008 for the finale. She performed “Battlefield” on the May 13, 2009 episode of American Idol. The following year, Sparks took part in a tribute to Simon Cowell with other former contestants at the Season 9 finale on May 26, 2010. Most recently, during Season 10, Sparks performed her new song “I Am Woman” on the Top 4 results show.

Performances/results

Episode Theme Song choice Original artist Order # Result
Audition N/A Because You Loved Me Celine Dion N/A Advanced
Hollywood N/A Some Kind of Wonderful Soul Brothers Six N/A Advanced
Top 24 (12 Women) N/A Give Me One Reason Tracy Chapman 6 Safe
Top 20 (10 Women) Dedication Week Reflection Christina Aguilera 6 Safe
Top 16 (8 Women) N/A Heartbreaker Pat Benatar 1 Safe
Top 12 Diana Ross If We Hold On Together Diana Ross 12 Safe
Top 11 British Invasion I (Who Have Nothing) Ben E. King 7 Safe
Top 10 No Doubt/artists who inspire Gwen Stefani Hey Baby No Doubt 9 Safe
Top 9 American Classics “On a Clear Day” Tony Bennett 5 Safe
Top 3
Top 8 Latin Rhythm Is Gonna Get You Gloria Estefan 6 Safe
Top 7 Country A Broken Wing Martina McBride 2 Safe
Top 6 Inspirational You’ll Never Walk Alone Rodgers and Hammerstein 6 Safe
Non-Elimination Week
Top 6 Bon Jovi Livin’ on a Prayer Bon Jovi 2 Safe
Top 4 Barry Gibb To Love Somebody
Woman in Love
Bee Gees
Barbra Streisand
4
8
Safe
Top 3 Judge’s Choice (Simon Cowell)
Producer’s Choice
Contestant’s Choice
Wishing on a Star
She Works Hard for the Money
“I (Who Have Nothing)”
Rose Royce
Donna Summer
Ben E. King
1
4
7
Safe
Finale New Song
Previous Song
Coronation Song
Fighter
“A Broken Wing”
This Is My Now
Christina Aguilera
Martina McBride
Jordin Sparks
2
4
6
Winner

Recording career

2007–2008: Jordin Sparks

After winning American Idol, Sparks signed to 19 Recordings/Jive Records, becoming the first Idol winner to join the label.[15] On August 27, 2007, she released her debut single, “Tattoo“,[16] which peaked at number eight on the Billboard Hot 100, becoming Sparks’ first top ten hit on the chart.[14] The song certified platinum in the United States[17] and Australia.[18] To date, “Tattoo” has sold over two million copies in the U.S.[19]
Sparks released her self-titled debut studio album on November 20, 2007,[20] which debuted at number ten on the Billboard 200. To date, it has sold over a million copies in the U.S[21] and was certified platinum by the RIAA.[17]No Air“, a duet with Chris Brown, was released as the second single from the album in February 2008. In the United States, the song peaked at number three on the Billboard Hot 100 becoming Sparks’ best-charting single to date.[14] It was also her first song to appear on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart, where it reached number four.[14] To date, the song has sold over three million copies in the U.S, making Sparks the first American Idol contestant to reach the three million mark.[22] It also became Brown’s first song to hit three million. “No Air” also charted in Australia[23] and New Zealand,[24] where it reached number one, receiving platinum certifications in both countries.[18][25]
On February 3, 2008, Sparks sang the National Anthem at Super Bowl XLII.[26] She performed in a tribute to Aretha at the NAACP Awards in February, as well. She had previously performed in a tribute to Diana Ross in December 2007.
In support of the album, Sparks opened for Alicia Keys on the North America leg of her As I Am Tour, starting on April 19, 2008.[27] Before the tour, a career-threatening throat injury forced Sparks to cancel a few weeks of the shows. Officials revealed she was suffering an acute vocal cord hemorrhage and was ordered strict vocal rest until the condition improved.[28] Sparks was back on the road by April 30, 2008 and remained on the tour until June 18, 2008. Sparks later joined Keys for the tour leg in Australia and New Zealand in December 2008.[29][30]
The album’s third single, “One Step at a Time“, was released in June 2008. It peaked at number seventeen on the Billboard Hot 100, giving Sparks her fourth top twenty hit on the chart.[14] This makes Sparks the only American Idol contestant to have her first four singles reach the top twenty of the Hot 100. It also charted in the top twenty in Australia,[23] Canada,[14] and the United Kingdom.[31] In New Zealand, the song reached number two[24] and was certified gold by the RIANZ.[25] In August 2008, Sparks co-headlined the Jesse & Jordin LIVE Tour with Jesse McCartney in the United States.[32]
Sparks received two MTV Video Music Award nominations for Best Female Video for “No Air” and Best New Artist at the 2008 MTV Video Music Awards.[33] While at the awards show, Sparks caused controversy by responding to a joke made by host Russell Brand during his opening monologue, in which he held up a silver ring, claiming to have relieved one of the Jonas Brothers of their virginity,[34] saying he would “take them more seriously if they wore it (the ring) around their genitals”. Sparks who also wears a promise ring, began her introduction of T.I. and Rihanna by saying “It’s not bad to wear a promise ring because not everybody, guy or girl, wants to be a slut.” In response to the controversy over her “slut” remark, Sparks told Entertainment Weekly that she doesn’t regret the remark, commenting that “I wish I would’ve worded it differently – that somebody who doesn’t wear a promise ring isn’t necessarily a slut – but I can’t take it back now.”[35] At the 2008 American Music Awards, Sparks won the award for Favorite Artist in the Adult Contemporary Category.[36]

2009–2010: Battlefield

On January 20, 2009, Sparks performed “Faith” at the Commander-in-Chief’s Inaugural Ball, hosted by President Barack Obama.[37] Her second studio album, Battlefield was released in the United States on July 21, 2009.[38] The album’s title track was released as the lead single on May 25, 2009 and reached number ten on the Billboard Hot 100.[14] The song peaked in the top five in Australia,[23] Canada,[14] and New Zealand.[24] In the United States, Battlefield debuted at number seven on the Billboard 200, peaking higher than her debut album’s position of number ten. However, the album was notably unsuccessful compared to her debut, only selling 177,000 copies in the U.S[21] and having failed to earn any chart certificates.
In support of the album, Sparks opened for The Jonas Brothers on the North America leg of the Jonas Brothers World Tour 2009, starting on June 20, 2009.[39] She also opened for Britney Spears on the second leg of her Circus Tour in North America, beginning on August 24, 2009.[40] Sparks served as a replacement for Ciara.
S.O.S. (Let the Music Play)“, was released as the second single from Battlefield on September 15, 2009.[41] The song topped the U.S Hot Dance Club Songs chart, becoming Sparks’ first number one on the chart[14] and peaked in the top fifteen in the United Kingdom.[31] During this time, she recorded the duet, “Art of Love“, with Australian artist Guy Sebastian for his fifth studio album, Like It Like That. The song reached the top ten in Australia[23] and New Zealand[24] and was certified platinum by the Australian Recording Industry Association.[42] The third single from Battlefield, “Don’t Let It Go to Your Head“, was released in the United Kingdom on January 8, 2010.[43] The song reached a peak of #16 on the UK Singles Chart despite no physical release.
In May 2010, Sparks embarked on her first headlining tour in the United States, the Battlefield Tour.[44] It began on May 1, 2010 and ended on July 18, 2010, stopping in over 35 major cities in the United States. In support of the DVD/Blu-Ray re-release of the Disney animated film, Beauty and the Beast, Sparks recorded a cover of the film’s title track for the soundtrack.[45] A music video for the song was released on October 18, 2010.[46]

2010–present: Third studio album

In a October 2010 interview, Sparks revealed she had begun working on her third studio album.[47] During an interview with Good Day New York in November 2010, Sparks confirmed she would be recording the album in New York and Arizona.[48] In January 2011, it was reported that Sparks and John Legend were working on songs together in the studio.[49] In March 2011, Sparks recorded a music video for a song called “The World I Knew” for the film, African Cats, which was released on April 22, 2011.[50] To support her third album, Sparks will serve as an opening act for the NKOTBSB summer tour.[51] On May 5, 2011, it was revealed that Sparks’ lead single for her forthcoming album is titled “I Am Woman“.[52] On May 12, 2011, Sparks performed “I Am Woman” on the American Idol Top 4 results show.[53] “I Am Woman” debuted on the US Billboard Hot 100 at number eighty-two with 33,000 downloads sold.[54][55] It also debuted on the US Billboard Digital Songs at number fifty-seven.[56] Sparks performed “I Am Woman” on Regis and Kelly on June 14th.[57][58][59].

Other ventures

Clothing line

In April 2008, it was announced that Sparks would team up with cosmetics company, Avon, to become a spokesperson for the teen-focused line Mark. In November 2008, Sparks teamed up with Wet Seal to create her own clothing line. The collection, appropriately named ‘Sparks’, began with an assortment of holiday dresses delivering to stores just in time for the busy Thanksgiving weekend. The line launched on November 19, 2008 and comes in sizes XS to XL. Sparks said, “I am so excited that Wet Seal and I have been able to create a line of clothing that will appeal to more girls than ever before.”[60]

Acting

In 2009, she made her acting debut on Disney’s The Suite Life on Deck, guest starring as herself in the “Crossing Jordin” episode. The episode guest starring Sparks aired on October 23, 2009.[61][62] Sparks also guest starred on the hit Nickelodeon show, Big Time Rush. The episode aired on June 18, 2010.[63]

Broadway

On May 3, 2010, it was announced that Sparks would join the cast of the Tony Award-winning Broadway show “In the Heights” as Nina Rosario. Sparks took part in the production from August 19 through November 14 for a consecutive 12 weeks.[64]

Fragrance

In October 2010, Sparks released her debut fragrance “Because of You….” This fragrance is currently being exclusively distributed at Dots, but by November will spread to other retail stores. The perfume is described as a “fruity floriental perfume” consisting of notes of “clementine, white imperial currant and orange blossom; a heart of nectarine, sharry baby orchid and coral charm peony; and a drydown of sheer musks, vanilla bean, Baltic amber and blond woods.” Sparks wanted this product to be affordable for her fans, yet still high end. “When I was starting this project, I really wanted it to be affordable. I looked at some other celebrity fragrances, and they were like $80. Even now, I look at a fragrance that’s $80, and I can’t bring myself to spend that much.”[65]

Charitable work

In 2007, Sparks was asked by a relative who works for SOS Children’s Villages USA in Florida to design a denim jacket festooned with Swarovski Crystal to support orphans. In February 2008, Sparks traveled to Ghana. She was part of the delegation of former U.S. President George W. Bush and former First Lady Laura Bush to help with Malaria No More, an organization with a goal to end malaria deaths in Africa by 2015. Sparks joined Mrs. Bush at the Maamobi Polyclinic, where the First Lady donated a number of treated bed nets to some local female traders in order to help combat the scourge of malaria in Ghana. While there, Sparks sang “Amazing Grace” to the durbar of chiefs who had gathered at the venue to give audience to Laura Bush. Sparks said, “Traveling to Ghana with Malaria No More gives me the incredible opportunity to see for myself what a difference a simple mosquito net can make in the life of a child.”

On May 20, 2009, Sparks became an endorser for the Got Milk? campaign, an American advertising campaign encouraging the consumption of cow’s milk On September 17, 2009, Sparks took part in the VH1 Divas special, a concert created to support the channel’s Save The Music Foundation[70] The concert was held at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in New York where Sparks performed the second single from her Battlefield album, S.O.S. (Let the Music Play), as well as “A Broken Wing” with Martina McBride. In February 2010, Sparks was one of the many artists who contributed to “We Are the World 25 for Haiti“, a charity single for the victims of the 2010 Haiti earthquake.[71] Sparks teamed up with Pennyroyal Silver creator and designer, Tim Foster to create her very own necklace design for the company’s signature collection. Proceeds of the necklace funded medical units in Haiti.[72]
On February 3, 2010, Sparks and David Archuleta performed at the “X the TXT” event, held at the Eden Roc Renaissance Hotel in Miami Beach, Florida. All proceeds raised by the event went to a number of charities, including the Miami Children’s Hospital Foundation. The following day both Sparks and Archuleta delivered teddy bears to children at the hospital.[73] In June 2010, the “Thumbs Up to X the TXT” pledge campaign, established by “The Allstate Corporation”, made its way to Sparks’ Battlefield Tour, presented by Mike & Ike to encourage teens and their families not to text while driving. Fans at Sparks’ concerts made a pledge not to text and drive by adding their thumbprint to a traveling banner at each of her shows. The campaign began at Sparks’ Battlefield Tour on June 3, 2010 and ended on July 18, 2010.[74] Sparks is the main spokesperson for the “I’m M.A.D., Are You?” campaign. She also supports Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation, which helps to raise money for children with cancer.[75] Sparks traveled to Louisiana in June 2010 to visit the Gulf Coast oil spill with the Audubon Society to view the effects of the oil spill on the wildlife and marshes.[76] Sparks is also is a member of the National Youth Leadership Committee for the Ronald Reagan Centennial Celebration, along with Nick Jonas, Genvieve Ryan, and Brodi Conover.

Discography

Studio albums

EPs

Tours

Headlining

Joint tours

Opening act

Awards and nominations

Year Award Category Result
2007 Teen Choice Awards Choice Female Reality/Variety Star[77] Won
2008 NAACP Image Awards Outstanding New Artist[78] Won
BET Pre-Awards Best Heartbreak Video (“No Air”)[79] Won
BET Awards Viewers Choice (“No Air“)[80] Nominated
Beautiful Face Award[81] Won
Teen Choice Awards Choice Hook-Up (“No Air”)[82] Won
Choice Love Song (“No Air”)[82] Nominated
Choice Breakout Artist[82] Nominated
MTV Video Music Awards Best Female Video (“No Air”) Nominated
Best New Artist Nominated
American Music Awards Favorite Adult Contemporary Artist[83] Won
2009 Grammy Awards Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals (“No Air”)[84] Nominated
People’s Choice Awards Favorite Pop Song (“No Air”)[85] Nominated
Favorite Combined Forces (“No Air”)[85] Won
NAACP Image Awards Outstanding Duo, Group or Collaboration (“No Air”)[86] Nominated
MTV Australia Awards Best Collaboration (“No Air”)[87] Nominated
2010 ARIA Music Awards Most Popular Australian Single (“Art of Love” with Guy Sebastian)[88] Nominated

Filmography

Year Title Role Notes
2009 The Suite Life On Deck Herself Episode: “Crossing Jordin
2010 Big Time Rush Herself Episode: “Big Time Sparks
When I Was 17 Herself Episode: 16
2011 BrainSurge Herself
Team Umizoomi[89] Voice Over

 

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Who is Countess Danielle Vaughn?

Who is Countess Danielle Vaughn?  The entertainment an acting world knows Countess Vaughn as an American actress and singer. She is perhaps best known for her role as Kim Parker on the UPN television sitcom Moesha and its spin-off The Parkers.

 Early life and career

Vaughn was born August 8, 1978 in Idabel, Oklahoma. She began her performing career at the age of three in 1981 singing at church. At age nine in 1988, she sang “I’ll Be There” to win the Star Search junior vocalist champion and overall junior champion. She was married to Joseph James, with whom she has a son Jaylin. During an appearance on the Mo’Nique Show, she shared that she also has a daughter.

Acting career

Vaughn began her acting career in 1988 with the role of Alexandria DeWitt on 227, followed by roles in Thea, Hangin’ with Mr. Cooper, and Roc. She also performed in several television specials including the Lou Rawls Parade of Stars, The Magical World of Disney, theOrange Bowl Parade, the Easter Seals Telethon.

Outside of television, she performed in the off-Broadway musical Mama, I Want to Sing! Part 2. In 1998, Vaughn was honored with anNAACP Image Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series for her performance in Moesha. In 1992, Vaughn released her first album, Countess, featuring a variety of songs, including dance music and urban ballads. The album’s lone single, a cover of James Brown’s “It’s A Man’s, Man’s, Man’s World”, charted in the top-100 of the Bilo’Nique. She starred in the UPN sitcom, The Parkers, until the show’s ending in 2004. In 2011, Vaughn made her return to situational comedy on the BET sitcom Let’s Stay Together. Vaughn portrayed the friend of the character Kita portrayed by Erica Hubbard.

Reality television

Celebrity Fit Club

Vaughn appeared in the third season of Celebrity Fit Club which premiered in January 2006 on VH1. On episode four,she announced that her and husband, James, were ending their marriage. During the course of the show, she became the first cast member to ever gain weight, with a weight gain of 4 pounds. It was said on the season finale that she was simply trying to lose weight at the wrong time.

Celebrity Rap Superstar

Vaughn appears as a contestant on MTV’s Celebrity Rap Superstar which premiered August 30, 2007. She studied under Warren G for the show. On September 27, 2007, an illness caused her to be eliminated from the competition.

Filmography

Film
Year Film Role Notes
1999 Trippin’ Anetta Jones
2001 Max Keeble’s Big Move Office Admin. Assistant
Television
Year Title Role Notes
1988 227 Alexandria 13 episodes
1992 Fievel’s American Tails Monique (Voice) 1 episode
Hangin’ with Mr. Cooper Keisha 2 episodes
1993 Thea Charlene 1 episode
1993–1994 Roc Carolita 2 episodes
1996 Minor Adjustments Monique 1 episode
1996–1999 Moesha Kimberly Ann Parker 83 episodes
1997 Goode Behavior 1 episode
1999–2004 The Parkers Kimberly Ann Parker 111 episodes
2003 MADtv Herself 1 episode
2006 Cuts Kelli 1 episode
Thugaboo: Sneaker Madness Dee Dee Voice
Thugaboo: A Miracle on D-Roc’s Street Dee Dee Voice
2011 Let’s Stay Together Chanteuse 1 episode

Awards and nominations

Year Award Result Category Series
1989 Young Artist Award Nominated Best Young Actress Featured, Co-starring, Supporting, Recurring Role in a Comedy or Drama Series or Special 227
1998 NAACP Image Awards Won Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series Moesha
1999 Nominated Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series Moesha’c’
2000 Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series

 

 

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Who is Michele Marie Bachmann?

 Who is Michele Marie Bachmann? The Political world knows her as Michele Bachmann, she is a member of the United States House of Representatives, representing Minnesota’s 6th congressional district, and a candidate for the Republican nomination in the 2012 U.S. presidential election.[4] She previously served in the Minnesota State Senate and is the first Republican woman to represent the state in Congress.[5]
Bachmann is a member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, a supporter of the Tea Party movement[6] and a founder of the House Tea Party Caucus.[7]
Bachmann earned a Master of Laws degree, worked as a tax attorney, and was a foster mother for 23 teenagers.[8]

Early life, education, and early career

Bachmann in highschool

Bachmann was born Michele Marie Amble in Waterloo, Iowa, April 6, 1956,  “into a family of Norwegian Lutheran Democrats”[9] who moved from Iowa to Minnesota when she was young.[10] After her parents divorced, Bachmann’s father, David John Amble, moved to California, and Bachmann was raised by her mother, Jean (née Johnson), who worked at the First National Bank in Anoka, Minnesota.[10][11] Bachmann grew up in Anoka, graduating from Anoka High School in 1974.
After graduating from high school, Bachmann spent time working on a kibbutz in Israel.[12] In 1978 she graduated from Winona State University with a B.A.. In 1986 she received a J.D. degree from Oral Roberts University, followed by an LL.M. degree in tax law from the William & Mary Law School in 1988.[13][14] She was a member of the final graduating class of the Oral Roberts University law school, and was part of a group of faculty, staff, and students who moved the ORU law school library to what is now Regent University.[15]
From 1988 to 1993, Bachmann was an attorney representing the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).[16] She left her position with the IRS to become a full-time mother.[17]

Family life

She married Marcus Bachmann in 1978.[18] They have five children (Lucas, Harrison, Elisa, Caroline, and Sophia), and have also provided foster care for 23 other children.[19][20]

Bachmann and her husband own a Christian counseling practice in Stillwater, Minnesota.[21][22]
Bachmann also has an ownership stake in a family farm located in Waumandee, Wisconsin. Since the death of her father-in-law in 2009, the farm and its buildings have been rented out to a neighboring farmer who maintains a dairy herd on the farm.

Early political activism and career

Bachmann grew up in a Democratic family, but she says she became a Republican during her senior year at Winona State. She told the Minneapolis Star Tribune that she was reading Gore Vidal‘s 1973 novel, Burr: “He was kind of mocking the Founding Fathers and I just thought, I just remember reading the book, putting it in my lap, looking out the window and thinking, ‘You know what? I don’t think I am a Democrat. I must be a Republican.[10][23]

While she was still a Democrat, Bachmann and her then-fiancé Marcus were inspired to join the pro-life movement by Francis Schaeffer‘s 1976 Christian documentary film, How Should We Then Live?. They frequently prayed outside of clinics and served as sidewalk counselors.[14] Bachmann was a supporter of Jimmy Carter in 1976 and she and her husband worked on his campaign.[24] During Carter’s presidency, Bachmann became disappointed with his liberal approach to public policy, support for legalized abortion and economic decisions she held responsible for increased gas prices. In the 1980 presidential election, she voted for Ronald Reagan and worked for his campaign.[14][25]
Bachmann’s political activism gained media notice at a pro-life protest in 1991. She and approximately 30 other pro-life citizens went to a Ramsey County Board meeting where a $3 million appropriation was to go to build a morgue for the county at St. Paul-Ramsey Medical Center (now called Regions Hospital). The Medical Center performed abortions and employed abortion rights pioneer Jane Hodgson. Bachmann attended the meeting to protest public tax dollars going to the hospital; speaking to the Star Tribune, she said that “in effect, since 1973, I have been a landlord of an abortion clinic, and I don’t like that distinction”.[16][26]
In 1993, Bachmann and other parents started a K-12 charter school in Stillwater, and she began speaking against a state-mandated set of educational standards, which propelled her into the world of politics.[27]
Bachmann became a critic and opponent of Minnesota’s School-to-Work policies. In a 1999 column, she wrote: “School-to-Work alters the basic mission and purpose of K-12 academic education away from traditional broad-based academic studies geared toward maximizing intellectual achievement of the individual. Instead, School-to-Work utilizes the school day to promote children’s acquisition of workplace skills, viewing children as trainees for increased economic productivity.”[28]

Minnesota Senate

In 2000, Bachmann defeated 18-year incumbent Gary Laidig to secure the GOP endorsement as State Senator for Minnesota District 56. She then defeated Ted Thompson of the Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) and Lyno Sullivan of the Minnesota Independence Party in the General Election. In 2002, after redistricting, Bachmann defeated a fellow incumbent State Senator Jane Krentz of the DFL for the newly drawn District 52.

On November 20, 2003, Bachmann and Representative Mary Liz Holberg proposed a constitutional amendment that would bar the state from legally recognizing same-sex marriage.[29] In 2004, Bachmann and a coalition of religious leaders announced plans for a “Minnesota for Marriage” rally.[30] Bachmann’s effort to place a marriage amendment on a referendum ballot in 2004 ultimately failed. She resurrected her proposal in March 2005[31] but it stalled indefinitely in a senate committee that April.[32]
In November 2004, Republican Senate Minority Leader Dick Day appointed Bachmann as Assistant Minority Leader in charge of Policy for the Senate Republican Caucus.[33] In July 2005, the Republican Caucus removed her from her leadership position. Bachmann cited disagreements with Day over her anti tax stance as the reason for her ouster.[34]

U.S. House of Representatives

Since 2007, Bachmann has served Minnesota’s 6th congressional district, which includes the northernmost and eastern suburbs of the Twin Cities and St. Cloud. She is the first Republican woman to be elected to the U.S. House from Minnesota.[35]

110th Congress

Iraq War troop surge

In January 2007, a resolution was approved in the House of Representatives opposing President George W. Bush‘s plan to increase troop levels in Iraq. Bachmann voted “No”. However, before supporting the proposed surge, Bachmann called for a full hearing, saying, “The American people deserve to hear and understand the merits of increasing U.S. troop presence in Iraq. Increased troop presence is justifiable if that measure would bring a swift conclusion to a difficult conflict.”[36] She hesitated to give a firm endorsement, calling the hearings “a good first step in explaining to the American people the course toward victory in Iraq”.[37] When pressed, she said she had not come to any conclusion on the matter,[37] saying, “I don’t believe we have all of the information in front of us. As a member of Congress that’s why I want to go to Iraq as quickly as I can. I want to get the best information in front of me.”[38]

Member of Congressional delegation

In July 2007, Bachmann joined a Congressional delegation visiting Ireland, Germany, Pakistan, Kuwait, and Iraq. Due to security concerns Bachmann was only able to meet briefly with US personnel in the Green Zone and upon her return she said she “was encouraged by reports of progress from Crocker, Gen. David Petraeus and other personnel in Iraq linked to the surge.”[39] She said the surge “hasn’t had a chance to be in place long enough to offer a critique of how it’s working. (Gen. Petraeus) said al-Qaida in Iraq is off its plan and we want to keep it that way. The surge has only been fully in place for a week or so.”[39]
Bachmann also spoke of the delegation’s visit to Islamabad to meet Pakistani Prime Minister Aziz at the same time as the siege of Islamic fundamentalists at the Lal Masjid mosque elsewhere in the city.[39] She reported that “The group [of U.S. Legislators] had to travel in armored vehicles and was constantly accompanied by Pakistani military….We were all able to see extremely up close and personal what it’s like to be in a region where fighting is occurring. We constantly felt like we were in need of security.”[39] Bachmann told reporters upon her return that “the dangers posed by Islamic terrorism in Iraq, Britain and Pakistan justified the continued American military presence in Iraq.”[39] She said “We don’t want to see al-Qaida get a presence in the United States. Al-Qaida doesn’t seem to show any signs of letting up. We have to keep that in mind.”[39]

Opposition to higher education finance bill

On July 11, 2007, Bachmann voted against the College Cost Reduction and Access Act that would raise the maximum Pell grant from $4,310 to $5,200, lower interest rates on subsidized student loans to 3.4 percent from 6.8 percent, raise loan limits to $30,500 from $7,500, disfavor married students who file joint tax returns, provide more favorable repayment terms to students who do not use their education to prosper financially[40] and favor public sector over private sector workers with much more favorable loan forgiveness benefits.[41] Supporters of the bill said “it would allow more students to attend college”.[42] Bachmann said her opposition was because “it fails students and taxpayers with gimmicks, hidden costs and poorly targeted aid. It contains no serious reform of existing programs, and it favors the costly, government-run direct lending program over nonprofit and commercial lenders.”[42] The bill passed the House [42] and was signed by President Bush.[43]

Light bulbs

Bachmann introduced the Light Bulb Freedom of Choice Act, which would require a GAO report show that a change to fluorescent bulbs (CFLs) would have “clear economic, health and environmental benefits” prior to enforcement of lighting efficiency regulations that effectively ban conventional light bulbs. Bachman argued, “Each light bulb contains between 3-6 milligrams of mercury. There’s a question about how that mercury will fill up our landfills, and also if you break one in your home, you’ll have mercury that instantaneously vaporizes in your home. That poses a very real threat to children, disabled people, pets, senior citizens. And I just think it’s very important that Americans have the choice to decide, would they like an incandescent or a (CFL)?”[44] Bob Collins of Minnesota Public Radio commented on the debate, noting a Popular Mechanics article which concluded that over the average life span of a CFL, an incandescent bulb could result in the emission of more mercury than an equivalent CFL, even if the CFL was broken, assuming power was generated by “a coal-fired power plant” (which produce about half the electricity the US consumes). However, Collins also noted there is evidence that “[for] some people, CFLs are a health risk.”, and that the environmental risks of CFLs deserve consideration. [45]

Class action lawsuits

On June 3, 2008, President George W. Bush signed the Credit and Debit Card Receipt Clarification Act (H.R. 4008) into law. The bipartisan bill, which Bachmann coauthored with Congressman Tim Mahoney (D-FL), removes statutory damages to end “frivolous lawsuits” aimed at businesses.[46]

Domestic oil and gas production

During the summer of 2008, as national gasoline prices rose to over $4 a gallon, Bachmann became a leading Congressional advocate for increased domestic oil and natural gas exploration in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) and the Outer Continental Shelf.[47] She joined 10 other House Republicans and members of the media on a Congressional Energy Tour to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado, and to Alaska. The trip was set up by Arctic Power, an Alaskan lobbying group that advocates for ANWR development. The purpose of the trip was to receive a first hand account of emerging renewable energy technologies and the prospects of increased domestic oil and natural gas production in Alaska, including ANWR.[48]

Global warming

Bachmann has charged that global warming is a hoax[49] and has been a vocal skeptic of global warming.[50] She has asserted that since carbon dioxide is “a natural byproduct of nature”, it is a beneficial gas required by plant life. She stated that because life requires carbon dioxide and it is part of the planet’s life cycle, it cannot be harmful. In a statement she made on the House floor on Earth Day, April 22, 2009, Bachmann stated she was against the cap and trade climate legislation, stating: “Carbon dioxide is not a harmful gas, it is a harmless gas. Carbon dioxide is natural; it is not harmful…. We’re being told we have to reduce this natural substance to create an arbitrary reduction in something that is naturally occurring in the earth.”[51]

Opposition to the bailout

Bachmann opposed both versions of the Wall Street bailout bill for America’s financial sector.
She voted against the first proposed $700 billion bailout of financial institutions, which failed to pass 205–228. She also advocated breaking up Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, and barring executives from excessive compensation or golden parachutes. However, she also advocated a plan that would suspend mark-to-market accounting rules and supported suspending the capital gains tax.[52]
The “Big Three” automakers; Ford, Chrysler, and General Motors, approached Congress to ask for roughly $15 billion to keep them operational into 2009. Bachmann criticized that bill, fearing that the initial sum of money would be followed by subsequent ones without the companies making changes to revive their business. Bachmann supported an alternative bail-out for the Big Three and the rest of the auto industry rather than the plan that passed. According to Bachmann, her alternative would set benchmarks for reducing their debt and renegotiating labor deals and would set up the financial assistance as interim insurance instead of a taxpayer-financed bailout.[53]

On anti-Americanism

On October 17, 2008, Bachmann gave an interview on MSNBC‘s Hardball with Chris Matthews in support of the presidential campaign of Senator John McCain that brought the Minnesota 6th Congressional District race national attention. During the interview she criticized Barack Obama for his association with Jeremiah Wright and Bill Ayers, saying “…usually we associate with people who have similar ideas to us, and it seems that it calls into question what Barack Obama’s true beliefs, and values, and thoughts are…I am very concerned that he [Barack Obama] may have anti-American views.” She also documented the terrorist bombings of Bill Ayers and his associations with Barack Obama, saying that “Bill Ayers is not someone the average American wants to see their president have an association with.” Matthews responded with, “Why is it of concern? What is wrong with it?[54] When asked by Matthews: “How many Congresspeople, members of Congress fit into that Anti-American crowd you describe”, Bachmann stated “You’d have to ask them Chris, I’m focusing on Barack Obama and the people he’s associated with”. Matthews followed up by asking “But he’s a Senator from the State of Illinois, he’s one of the members of Congress you suspect of being anti-American. How many people in the Congress of the United States do you think are anti-American? You’ve already suspected Barack Obama, is he alone or are there others?” Bachmann answered, “What I would say is that the news media should do a penetrating expose and take a look…I wish they would…I wish the American media would take a great look at the views of the people in Congress and find out are they pro-America, or anti-America. I think people would love to see an expose like that.”[55]
The five Democratic members of Minnesota’s congressional delegation — Tim Walz, Betty McCollum, Keith Ellison, Collin Peterson and Jim Oberstar — issued a joint statement in which they questioned her ability to “work in a bipartisan way to put the interests of our country first in this time of crisis”.[56] Former Secretary of State Colin Powell[57][58] and former Minnesota Governor Republican Arne Carlson[59] said that her comments had influenced their decisions to endorse Obama for president.
Bachmann brought up the interview before business leaders and Republicans during a campaign stop in St. Cloud, Minnesota on October 21, 2008. She stated that she never intended to question Obama’s patriotism. “I made a misstatement. I said a comment that I would take back. I did not, nor do I, question Barack Obama’s patriotism…. I did not say that Barack Obama is anti-American nor do I believe that Barack Obama is anti-American… [But] I’m very concerned about Barack Obama’s views. I don’t believe that socialism is a good thing for America.”[60] However, in March 2010, Bachmann said, “I said I had very serious concerns that Barack Obama had anti-American views. And now I look like Nostradamus” while speaking at a fund-raiser for the Susan B. Anthony List.[61][62] A year later, in March 2011, Bachmann was asked on Meet the Press if she still believed that Obama held un-American views. She responded “I believe that the actions of this government have, have been emblematic of ones that have not been based on true American values.” Pressed for clarification,she said “-I’ve already answered that question before. I said I had very serious concerns about the president’s views.”[63]

111th Congress

Global currency

On March 26, 2009, following comments by China proposing adoption of a global reserve currency, Bachmann introduced a resolution calling for a constitutional amendment to bar the dollar from being replaced by a foreign currency. Current law prohibits foreign currency from being recognized in the U.S., but Bachmann expressed concerns relating to the President’s power to make and interpret treaties.[64] Earlier that month, at a Financial Services Committee hearing, Bachmann asked both Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner and Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke if they would reject calls for the U.S. to move away from the U.S. dollar and they replied that they would reject such a call.[65]

2010 Census

In a June 17, 2009, interview with The Washington Times, Bachmann expressed concern that the questions on the 2010 United States Census had become “very intricate, very personal” and that ACORN, a community organizing group that had come under fire the previous year, might be part of the Census Bureau’s door-to-door information collection efforts. She stated, “I know for my family the only question we will be answering is how many people are in our home, we won’t be answering any information beyond that, because the Constitution doesn’t require any information beyond that.”[66] However, her statement was incorrect, as the nonpartisan Politifact watchdog group confirmed that the Constitution does require citizens to complete the census.[67] Fellow Republican Congressman Patrick McHenry (N.C.), Lynn Westmoreland (GA) and John Mica (FL), members of the Oversight and Government Reform Subcommittee on Information Policy, Census and National Archives, which oversees the census, subsequently asked Bachmann not to boycott the population count.[68]
Along with Congressman Ted Poe (TX-02), Bachmann introduced the American Community Survey Act to limit the amount of personal information solicited by the US Census Bureau.[69] She reiterated her belief that the census asks too many personal questions.[70]

“Armed and dangerous” quote

In March 2009, Bachmann was interviewed by the Northern Alliance Radio Network and promoted two forums she was hosting the next month in St. Cloud and Woodbury regarding Obama’s proposed cap and trade tax policy to limit greenhouse gas emissions. Bachmann said she wanted Minnesotans “armed and dangerous on this issue of the energy tax because we need to fight back.” Bachmann’s office quickly clarified that she was speaking metaphorically, meaning “armed with knowledge.” However, according to the Star Tribune, her quote went viral across the internet.[71][72]

AmeriCorps

In 2009, Bachmann became a critic of what she characterized as proposals for mandatory public service.[19] Speaking in reference to the Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act, an expansion to AmeriCorps (a federal community service organization), she said in April:

It’s under the guise of—quote—volunteerism. But it’s not volunteers at all. It’s paying people to do work on behalf of government. … I believe that there is a very strong chance that we will see that young people will be put into mandatory service. And the real concerns is that there are provisions for what I would call re-education camps for young people, where young people have to go and get trained in a philosophy that the government puts forward and then they have to go to work in some of these politically correct forums.[73]

The original bill called for an exploration of whether a mandatory public service program could be established, but that entire section on creating a “Congressional Commission on Civic Service” was stripped from the bill.[74]
In August 2009, political opponents of Bachmann publicized in the local media and the blogosphere what they described as the “ironic” fact that her son, Harrison, joined Teach for America,[75][76] which is a member of the AmeriCorps program.[77]

Health care

Bachmann contributed to the “death panel” controversy when she read from a July 24 article written by Betsy McCaughey from the floor of the House. Sarah Palin said that her “death panel” remark was inspired by what she called the “Orwellian” opinions of Ezekiel Emanuel as described by Bachmann,[78][79][80][81][82][83] who accused him of advocating health care rationing by age and disability.[84] According to PolitiFact[85] and Time,[86] Bachmann’s euthanasia remarks distorted Emanuel’s position on health care for the elderly and disabled. FactCheck.org stated, “We agree that Emanuel’s meaning is being twisted.”[87] When many doctors wanted to legalize euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide, Emanuel opposed it.[88]
On August 31, 2009, Bachmann spoke at an event in Colorado, saying of Democratic health care overhaul proposals that:

This cannot pass. What we have to do today is make a covenant, to slit our wrists, be blood brothers on this thing. This will not pass. We will do whatever it takes to make sure this doesn’t pass.[89]

She outlined ideas for changing the health care system, including: “Erase the boundaries around every single state when it comes to health care,” enabling consumers to purchase insurance across state lines; increase the use of health savings accounts and allow everyone to “take full deductibility of all medical expenses,” including insurance premiums; and tort reform.[89]
Bachmann denounced the government-run health insurance public option, calling it a “government takeover of health care” that would “squeeze out private health insurance”.[90]

Critique of President Obama’s Asian trip

In an interview with Anderson Cooper on November 3, 2010, when discussing cuts in government spending for Medicare and Social Security suggested by Congressman Paul Ryan, Bachmann was asked what cuts in government spending she would make to reduce the deficit. She cited President Obama’s then-upcoming trip to Asia as an example, saying it “is expected to cost the taxpayers $200 million a day. He’s taking two thousand people with him. He’ll be renting out over 870 rooms in India. And these are 5-star hotel rooms at the Taj Mahal Palace hotel. This is the kind of over-the-top spending, it’s a very small example, Anderson.” Bachmann was apparently referring to information in a story from the Press Trust of India, attributed to “a top official of the Maharashtra Government privy to the arrangements for the high-profile visit”, information that was also published in U.S.-based media such as The Drudge Report.[91] In response to the news report’s claim that 34 warships were accompanying the President, a Pentagon spokesman, Geoff Morrell, dismissed the account as “comical”. The White House said that the press report figures were “wildly inflated” and had “no basis in reality”.[92] While stating that they could not give the actual projected figures for security reasons, staffers maintained costs were in line with the official travel costs of previous Presidents Bush and Clinton.[91]

112th Congress

Leadership run

Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-OH) (2nd-L) participates in a mock swearing in for Rep. Michele Bachmann

After the 2010 elections and the announcement from Rep. Mike Pence that he was stepping away from his leadership position in the House, Bachmann announced on her Facebook page her intention to seek the position of House Republican Conference Chair. As Bachmann is the founder of the House’s Tea Party Caucus, her announcement caused some to see the leadership election as “an early test of how GOP leaders will treat the antiestablishment movement’s winners”.[93] Many among the House’s Republican leadership, including Eric Cantor and the retiring Mike Pence, were quick to endorse Rep. Jeb Hensarling for the position; Speaker-to-be John Boehner remained neutral on the issue.[94] Supporters of Bachmann’s run include Reps. Steve King, John Kline, Louie Gohmert, Chip Cravaack, Erik Paulsen, as well as media personality and political commentator Glenn Beck.[95] Listing her qualifications for the position Bachmann noted “I’ve done an effective job speaking out at a national and local level, motivating people with our message, calling attention to deficits in Obama’s policy. I was instrumental in bringing tens of thousands of people to the US capitol to rally against Obama care and to attend our press conference.”[95] She noted her work to keep the Tea Party within the GOP rather than having it become a third party thereby helping the party capture the House, stating “I have been able to bring a voice and motivate people to, in effect, put that gavel in John Boehner’s hands, so that Republicans can lead going forward. …It’s important that leadership represents the choice of the people coming into our caucus….I think I have motivated a high number of people to get involved in this cycle who may have sat it out and that have made a difference on a number of these races. I gave a large amount of money to NRCC and individual candidates and started Michelle PAC, which raised $650,000 for members since July, so I was able to financially help about 50 people out.”[95]
Bachmann’s bid suffered a setback when she was passed over for the GOP’s transition team on which Hensarling was placed.[96] Despite Bachmann’s leading all other Representatives in fund raising, a Republican aide stated some “members are getting resentful of Bachmann, who they say is making the argument that you’re not really a Tea Party supporter unless you support her. That’s gone through the formation of the Tea Party Caucus and the formation of this candidacy of hers. It’s just not so.”[96] Sarah Palin, with whom Bachmann had campaigned earlier in the year, declined to endorse her leadership bid, while other Tea Party favorites Reps Adam Kinzinger and Tim Scott were placed on the transition team.[96] According to some senior House staff members, the party leadership was concerned about some of Bachmann’s high profile faux pas, the high rate of turnover amongst her staff, and how willing she would be to advance the party’s messaging rather than her own.[97]
On November 10, Bachmann released a statement ending her campaign for Conference Chair and giving her “enthusiastic” support to Hensarling.[98]

Committee assignment

Bachmann was selected by House Speaker John Boehner for a position “on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, giving her a new role as overseer of the CIA, the National Security Agency and the rest of the U.S. intelligence community.”[99] Bachmann, who had “not served on any committee that deals with foreign policy issues” requested the position,[99] “a move that has fueled speculation that she may be planning to carry the Tea Party banner into the GOP presidential primaries.”[99]

Repeal of Dodd-Frank reform

Soon after being sworn in to her third term Bachmann introduced legislation to repeal the Dodd-Frank financial reform law. She stated “I’m pleased to offer a full repeal of the job-killing Dodd-Frank financial regulatory bill. Dodd-Frank grossly expanded the federal government beyond its jurisdictional boundaries. It gave Washington bureaucrats the power to interpret and enforce the legislation with little oversight. Real financial regulatory reform must deal with these lenders who were a leading cause of our economic recession. True reform must also end the bailout mind-set that was perpetuated by the last Congress.” She also took issue with the law for not addressing the liabilities of the tax-payer funded Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.[100] Bachmann’s bill has been endorsed by such conservative groups as the Club for Growth and Americans for Prosperity, it has four other Republican co-sponsors including Rep Darrell Issa, who became the new chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee at the start of the 112th Congress.[101] Bachmann’s call for total repeal was seen as more drastic than the approach advocated by her fellow Republican Spencer Bachus who became the House Financial Services Committee Chairman with the change of majority in the House. Bachus “plans to provide ‘vigorous’ oversight of regulators efforts to reform banking and housing…reform Fannie and Freddie”, and “dismantle pieces of [the] Dodd-Frank Act that he believes ‘unnecessarily punish small businesses and community banks.'”[101] In response to Bachmann’s legislation Rep Barney Frank stated, “Michele Bachmann, the Club for Growth, and others in the right-wing coalition have now made their agenda for the financial sector very clear: they yearn to return to the thrilling days of yesteryear, so the loan arrangers can ride again – untrammeled by any rules restraining irresponsibility, excess, deception, and most of all, infinite leverage.”[101] The chances of Bachmann’s legislation passing were viewed as unlikely, the Financial Times wrote that “Like the Republican move to repeal healthcare reform, Ms Bachmann’s bill could be passed by the House of Representatives but be blocked by the Senate or White House.”[102]

State of the Union response

Bachmann responded to President Obama’s 2011 State of the Union speech for the Tea Party Express website; this speech was broadcast live by CNN. She insisted that her response was not intended to counter the official Republican party response by Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin. When asked if the speech was an indication of competition with Ryan and Speaker Boehner’s leadership team, Bachmann dismissed such a view as “a fiction of the media”, she had alerted Ryan and the leadership team that her response might go national and no objections were raised.[103]

Repeal of Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

Bachmann has characterized the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act as “ObamaCare”, and has continually called for its repeal.[104] She recalled to reporters that she called for debate to repeal the act “the morning after Obamacare passed”.[104] Joining with Rep. Steve King she introduced “the Bachmann-King repeal of health care bill” stating that it “is our intent in our heart to make sure that Obamacare is completely repealed.”[104] In light of a Democratic held Senate and Presidency that oppose repeal, Bachmann called on the Republican held House of Representatives to not provide any funds for the implementation of the act “But until we can see that [repeal] happen, we want to fully defund this bill so that, like, it would be akin to a helium balloon that gets no helium inside so that it can’t take off the ground, and that’s what we’re planning to do. I’m very, very grateful for nothing else; having a majority in the House of Representatives so that we have the ability of the power of the purse to not fund Obamacare, and this is exactly the right way to go.”[104]
On March 4, 2011 Bachmann (who was one of the six House Republicans to vote against the continuing resolution) expressed her unhappines with the move that gave a two-week reprieve to the fear of government shutdown, stating “I am vowing to vote ‘no’ on future Continuing Resolutions to fund the government unless there is specific language included to defund Obamacare and rescind the funding that has already been appropriated. Defunding Obamacare, along with defunding Planned Parenthood, must be non-negotiable planks in our budget negotiations.”[105][106]
In an appearance on Meet the Press on March 6, 2011 and during a March 7, 2011 interview with Sean Hannity, Bachmann declared that the Obama administration and the Congressional Democrats had hidden $105 billion in spending in the overhaul of the American Health Care System. She portrayed the Democratic leadership as timing the release of the bill’s text to avoid detection of the spending “We didn’t get the bill until a literally couple of hours before we were supposed to vote on it.”[107] She also stated the spending was split up within different portions of the bill to mask its total cost. Bachmann was alerted of the situation by the conservative Heritage Foundation which read the tallies of the Congressional Research Service and Congressional Budget Office.
Reports listed a partial breakdown of the costs which include “about $40 billion would go to the Children’s Health Insurance Program, $15 billion would go to Medicare and Medicaid innovation programs, and $9.5 billion would go to the Community Health Centers Fund.”[107] As the funds are designated mandatory spending (they are not controlled by the annual appropriations acts), the funds would remain even if the move to defund the reform law succeeded.
Bachmann stated that $16 billion of the money gives Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius a “slush fund…[to do] whatever she wants with this money.”[107] She called on the bills supporters to return the money, “I think this deception that the president and [former House Speaker Nancy] Pelosi and [Senate Majority Leader Harry] Reid put forward with appropriating over $105 billion needs to be given back to the people.”[108]
When asked during the Meet the Press interview if she would take back her previous comments that Obama held “anti-American views” and was running a “gangster government”, Bachmann backed her statements, saying “I do believe that actions that have been taken by this White House — I don’t take back my statements on gangster government. I think that there have been actions taken by the government that are corrupt…I said I have very serious concerns about the president’s views, and I think the president’s actions in the last two years speak for themselves.”[108]
In response to Bachmann’s charges Chief Deputy Democrat Whip Rep. Jan Schakowsky, who serves on the House health subcommittee, pointed out that the report Bachmann refers to is an update of a report that came out in October 2010 and that the costs were spelled out in both the bill and the Congressional Budget Office’s estimate of its cost, “Michele Bachmann obviously didn’t read the bill, because there was absolutely nothing hidden in that legislation.” Schakowsky held that the costs were not kept secret, citing the $40 billion for the Children’s Health Insurance Program as an example “There was a robust debate about whether or not that should be included,etc. So this idea of somehow, now at the last minute, there was a secret addition to some kind of funding…is absolute nonsense.”[109]

Political positions

Education policy

Bachmann supports the teaching of intelligent design in public school science classes.[110] During a 2003 interview on the KKMS Christian radio program Talk The Walk, Bachmann said that evolution is a theory that has never been proven one way or the other.[111] She co-authored a bill [that received no additional endorsement among her fellow legislators] that would require public schools to include alternative explanations for the origin of life as part of the state’s public school science curricula.[112] In October 2006, Bachmann told a debate audience in St. Cloud, Minnesota “there is a controversy among scientists about whether evolution is a fact or not…. There are hundreds and hundreds of scientists, many of them holding Nobel Prizes, who believe in intelligent design.”[113]

Fiscal policy

Bachmann opposes minimum wage increases.[114] Bachmann supports increased domestic drilling of oil and natural gas, as well as pursuing renewable sources of energy such as wind and solar, and is a strong proponent of nuclear power.[115]
In a 2001 flyer, Bachmann and Michael J. Chapman wrote that federal policies manage a centralized, state-controlled economy in the United States.[116] She wrote that education laws passed by Congress in 2001, including “School To Work” and “Goals 2000″, created a new national school curriculum that embraced “a socialist, globalist worldview; loyalty to all government and not America.”[116] In 2003, Bachmann said that the “Tax Free Zones” economic initiatives of Republican Governor Tim Pawlenty were based on the Marxist principle of “from each according to his abilities, to each according to his needs.”[117] She also said that the administration was attempting to govern and run centrally planned economies through an organization called the Minnesota Economic Leadership Team (MELT), an advisory board on economic and workforce policy chaired by Pawlenty.[117] She said that health care reform advocates “forg[et] what the Constitution says.”[118]
Prior to her election to the state senate, and again in 2005, Bachmann signed a “no new taxes” pledge sponsored by the Taxpayers League of Minnesota.[16][119] As a state senator, Bachmann introduced two bills that would have severely limited state taxation. In 2003, she proposed amending the Minnesota state constitution to adopt the “Taxpayers’ Bill of Rights” (TABOR).[120]
In 2005, Bachmann opposed Minnesota Governor Tim Pawlenty’s proposal for a state surcharge of 75 cents per pack on the wholesale cost of cigarettes. Bachmann said that she opposed the state surcharge “100 percent—it’s a tax increase.”[121] She later came under fire from the Taxpayers’ League for reversing her position and voting in favor of the cigarette surcharge.[122]

Social Security and Medicare

Bachmann has called for phasing out of Social Security and Medicare:

…what you have to do, is keep faith with the people that are already in the system, that don’t have any other options, we have to keep faith with them. But basically what we have to do is wean everybody else off.[123][124]

Foreign policy

Bachmann says in dealing with Iran, diplomacy “is our option”, but that other options, including a nuclear strike, shouldn’t be taken off the table.[125]
She has also said that she is “a long time supporter of Israel”.[12]

Global economy

In a discussion about the G-20 summit in Toronto, during an interview with conservative radio host Scott Hennen, Bachmann stated that she does not want America to be part of the international global economy.[126][127]

I don’t want the United States to be in a global economy where our economic future is bound to that of Zimbabwe, We can’t necessarily trust the decisions that are being made financially in other countries. I don’t like the decisions that are being made in our own country, but certainly I don’t want to trust the value of my currency and my future to that of like a Chavez down in Venezuela.

On economists who have influenced her views, Bachmann told the Wall Street Journal,

… the late Milton Friedman as well as Thomas Sowell and Walter Williams. “I’m also an Art Laffer fiend—we’re very close,” she adds. “And [Ludwig] von Mises. I love von Mises,” getting excited and rattling off some of his classics like Human Action and Bureaucracy. “When I go on vacation and I lay on the beach, I bring von Mises.”[128]

Social issues

Bachmann supports both a federal and state constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage and any legal equivalents.[129]In support of a constitutional amendment she proposed to ban same-sex marriage,[130][131] In 2004, the Star Tribune reported that Bachmann said of people who are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgendered, “We need to have profound compassion for people who are dealing with the very real issue of sexual dysfunction in their life and sexual identity disorders“.[132][133] Bachmann has praised the controversial Christian youth ministry You Can Run But You Cannot Hide International, appearing as a keynote speaker at their fundraisers.[134][135][136]
In 2006, Bachmann stated that she would vote to permit abortion in cases of rape and incest.[137] In the state senate, Bachmann introduced a bill proposing a constitutional amendment restricting state funds for abortion. The bill died in committee.[138]

Political campaigns

2006 congressional

Bachmann won her Congressional seat in the 2006 election with 50 percent of the vote, as she defeated Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) candidate Patty Wetterling and the Independence Party‘s John Binkowski.
Mark Kennedy, the 6th District’s congressman since 2001, announced in late 2005 that he would be running for the U.S. Senate seat being vacated by Mark Dayton of the DFL. Bachmann states she was called by God to run for the seat, and that she and her husband fasted for three days to be sure.[139]
According to Bloomberg.com news, evangelical conservative leader James Dobson put the resources of his organization behind her 2006 campaign. Dobson’s Focus on the Family planned to distribute 250,000 voter guides in Minnesota churches to reach social conservatives, according to Tom Prichard, president of the Minnesota Family Council, a local affiliate of Dobson’s group. In addition to Minnesota, Dobson’s group also organized turnout drives in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Michigan, Ohio, New Jersey and Montana.[140]
During a debate televised by WCCO on October 28, 2006, news reporter Pat Kessler quoted a story that appeared in the Minneapolis Star Tribune and asked Bachmann whether it was true that the church she belonged to taught that the Pope is the Anti-Christ. Bachmann stated that her church “does not believe that the Pope is the Anti-Christ, that’s absolutely false… I’m very grateful that my pastor has come out and been very clear on this matter, and I think it’s patently absurd and it’s a false statement.”[141]
Bachmann received support from a fundraising visit in early July 2006 from Speaker of the House Dennis Hastert.[142] On July 21, 2006, Karl Rove visited Minnesota to raise funds for her election.[143] In August, President George W. Bush was the keynote speaker at her congressional fundraiser, which raised about $500,000.[144] Bachmann also received fundraising support from Vice President Dick Cheney.[145] The National Republican Congressional Committee put nearly $3 million into the race, for electronic and direct-mail ads against DFLer Wetterling. The amount was significantly more than the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee spent on behalf of Wetterling. On November 7, 2006, Bachmann defeated opponents Patty Wetterling and John Binkowski, taking 50 percent of the vote to Wetterling’s 42 percent and Binkowski’s eight percent.[146]

2008 congressional

In 2008, Bachmann won re-election over her Democratic and Independence Party endorsed opponent Elwyn Tinklenberg. With all precincts reported, Bachmann won, 46.41% to 43.43%.[147] Because Tinklenberg was running as a DFLer in the Democratic primary this allowed candidate Bob Anderson to run in the Independence Party primary unopposed despite not having the Independence endorsement. Anderson received 10% of the vote.
In the 2007-2008 election cycle, Bachmann’s campaign raised over $3.49 million for her re-election. Roughly 70% of her contributions came from individual contributions, and of those, 28% were from small individual contributions and 42% were from large individual contributions.[148]

2010 congressional

Bachmann was challenged in 2010 by Democratic-Farmer-Labor nominee Tarryl Clark and Independent Candidate Bob Anderson. With more than $8.5 million, Bachmann spent more than any other House of Representative candidate, although her opponent, Tarryl Clark, was able to raise $4 million, one of the largest fundraising efforts in the nation for a U.S. House challenger.[149] On November 2, 2010, Bachmann defeated Tarryl Clark by 52% to 40% of the vote.
In the 2009-2010 election cycle, Bachmann’s campaign raised over $13.4 million for her re-election; the average House member raised about $1 million over the same election cycle. Roughly 96% of her contributions came from individual contributors, and of those, 56% were from small individual contributions and 40% were from large individual contributions.[150] Additionally, 3% came from PAC contributions and less than 1% from other sources.

2012 presidential campaign

In early 2011, there was much speculation that Bachmann would run for president in 2012. Bachmann participated in the second Republican presidential debate in New Hampshire on June 13, 2011; during the debate she announced she had filed paperwork with the Federal Election Commission (FEC) earlier that day to become a candidate for the GOP nomination.[151]

 

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