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4 people got busted on March 1, 2012

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Vitali Anikeyenko, Ukrainian, died from a plane crash he was 24

Vitaly Serhiiovych Anikeyenko was a Ukrainian-Russian professional ice hockey player died from a plane crash he was 24.. Born in Kiev, Anikeyenko spent the entirety of his professional hockey career with Lokomotiv Yaroslavl of the Kontinental Hockey League, save for the a loan spell with Metallurg Novokuznetsk during 2007–08. He was a member of the Russian national team that competed in the IIHF World Championship‘s under 18 and under 20 levels; winning a silver medal for the country in 2007. Anikeyenko was drafted 70th overall in the 2005 NHL Entry Draft by the Ottawa Senators. He died along with most of the Lokomotiv team in a plane crash on the first day of the 2011–12 season.

(January 2, 1987 – September 7, 2011) 

Death

On September 7, 2011, Anikeyenko was killed in a plane crash when a
Yakovlev Yak-42 passenger aircraft, carrying nearly his entire Lokomotiv Yaroslavl team, crashed at Tunoshna Airport, just outside the city of Yaroslavl, Russia. The team was traveling to Minsk
to play their opening game of the season, with its coaching staff and
prospects. Lokomotiv officials confirmed that the entire main roster was
on the flight, including four players from the junior team.[2][3][4] The bodies of Ukrainian teammates Anikeyenko and Daniil Sobchenko were repatriated following the crash for burial in Ukraine.[5] The funeral was held on September 10 at Sovskom cemetery in Kiev.[6]

Career statistics

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
2005–06 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl RSL 26 0 1 1 28 1 0 0 0 0
2006–07 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl RSL 25 1 2 3 16 3 0 0 0 12
2007–08 Metallurg Novokuznezk RSL 10 1 1 2 10
2007–08 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl RSL 40 4 9 13 48 16 0 0 0 20
2008–09 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl KHL 40 2 9 11 44 19 0 2 2 10
2009–10 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl KHL 52 7 11 18 50 9 1 0 1 8
2010–11 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl KHL 52 5 14 19 79 3 0 2 2 4
RSL totals 101 6 13 19 102 20 0 0 0 32

International statistics

Year Team Event Place GP G A Pts PIM
2003 Russia WJC18 3 6 0 0 0 4
2005 Russia WJC18 5th 6 1 1 2 12
2007 Russia WJC 2 6 0 1 1 10
Junior Int’l Totals 18 1 2 3 26

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Mikhail Balandin, Russian, died from a plane crash he was 31

Mikhail Yuriyevich Balandin  was a Russian professional ice hockey player  died from a plane crash he was 31.. Balandin played for Lokomotiv Yaroslavl of the Kontinental Hockey League (KHL) at the time of his death. Balandin had also played for Salavat Yulaev Ufa, HC Lada Togliatti, HC CSKA Moscow, Mytishchi Khimik,[1] Mytishchi Atlant and UHC Dynamo[2] in Russia. Balandin won a silver medal with the Russian team at the 2000 World Junior Ice Hockey Championships.[3]

(July 27, 1980 – September 7, 2011)

Death

On September 7, 2011, Balandin was killed, when a Yakovlev Yak-42
passenger aircraft, carrying nearly his entire Lokomotiv team, crashed
just outside Yaroslavl, Russia. The team was traveling to Minsk
to play their opening game of the season, with its coaching staff and
prospects. Lokomotiv officials said “‘everyone from the main roster was
on the plane plus four players from the youth team.’”[4][5][6]

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Gennady Churilov, Russian, died from a plane crash he was 24

Gennady Stanislavovich Churilov was a Russian professional ice hockey player died from a plane crash he was 24.. Churilov played for Lokomotiv Yaroslavl of the Kontinental Hockey League (KHL).[1]

(May 5, 1987 – September 7, 2011) 

Death

On September 7, 2011, Churilov was killed in the 2011 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl air disaster,
when a Yakovlev Yak-42 passenger aircraft, carrying nearly his entire
Lokomotiv team, crashed just outside Yaroslavl, Russia. The team was
traveling to Minsk
to play their opening game of the season, with its coaching staff and
prospects. Lokomotiv officials said “‘everyone from the main roster was
on the plane plus four players from the youth team.’”[2][3][4]

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Pavol Demitra, Slovakian, died from a plane crash he was 36

Pavol Demitra  was a Slovak professional ice hockey player died from a plane crash he was 36.. He played sixteen seasons in the National Hockey League (NHL), two in the Czechoslovak First Ice Hockey League (CFIHL)/Slovak Extraliga and one in the Kontinental Hockey League (KHL). Known as an offensive player, Demitra was a first- or second-line forward throughout his career.

(29 November 1974 – 7 September 2011)

After a season with HC Dukla Trenčín in the CFIHL, Demitra was selected 227th overall in the 1993 NHL Entry Draft by the Ottawa Senators. He subsequently left Slovakia to join the Senators organization and played three seasons between the NHL and the American Hockey League with Ottawa’s minor league affiliate, the PEI Senators. Demitra began the 1996–97 season in a contract holdout with the Senators, resulting in him being traded to the St. Louis Blues in November 1996. After spending the majority of his first season with St. Louis organization in the International Hockey League, he secured a regular roster spot with the Blues in 1996–97. Demitra spent his most successful seasons with St. Louis, being named to three NHL All-Star Games (1999, 2000 and 2002) and winning the Lady Byng Memorial Trophy in 2000. He achieved the 30-goal mark three times and the 90-point mark once with the Blues. Due to the 2004–05 NHL lockout,
Demitra returned to HC Dukla Trenčín for one season. Upon returning to
the NHL the following year, he signed as a free agent with the Los Angeles Kings. After one year with Los Angeles, he was traded to the Minnesota Wild, where he played on the team’s top line with winger Marián Gáborík. In July 2008, he became an unrestricted free agent and signed with the Vancouver Canucks.
Demitra left the NHL after a two-year stint with the Canucks, joining
Lokomotiv Yarolsavl of the Kontinental Hockey League. Demitra spent the
entire 2010–11 KHL season with Lokomotiv, netting 18 goals and 43 assists in 54 games. On September 7, 2011, the eve of the 2011-12 KHL season, a plane carrying the Lokomotiv players and coaching staff crashed shortly after takeoff. 44 passengers, including Demitra, died as a result.[1][2][3]
In international competition, Demitra began his career with Czechoslovakia. He won a gold medal at the 1992 IIHF European U18 Championship and a bronze medal at the 1993 IIHF World U20 Championship. After the country split in 1993, Demitra began competing for Slovakia. Beginning in 1996, he played in six IIHF World Championships, winning a bronze medal in 2003 and captaining his country in 2011. In 1996 and 2004, Demitra participated in the NHL-sanctioned World Cup. He was also a three-time Olympian and played his first tournament in 2002. Four years later, he captained Slovakia and in 2010, where he led all scorers in points and was named to the tournament’s All-Star Team.

Czechoslovakia

Demitra began playing at the men’s level with ZTS Dubnica in
Czechoslovakia’s second-tier league; he recorded 23 points (13 goals and
10 assists) over 28 games. The following season, Demitra joined HC Dukla Trenčín of the premier Czechoslovak Extraliga in 1992–93, where he scored 11 goals and 28 points in 46 games. After the season, Demitra was drafted by the Ottawa Senators in the ninth round, 227th overall in the 1993 NHL Entry Draft. He came to be considered one of the best draft steals in NHL history.[4]

Ottawa Senators

Demitra began the 1993–94 season with the Ottawa Senators, and in his first NHL game on 9 October 1993, Demtira scored on St. Louis Blues goaltender Curtis Joseph
for his first ever NHL goal and point in a 7–5 loss. He played in 12
games for Ottawa during the season, scoring a goal and two points. Most
of the 1993–94 was spent with the Prince Edward Island Senators of the AHL, as Demitra had 18 goals and 41 points in 41 games for the team.
Demitra spent most of the 1994–95
with PEI, where in 61 games, Demitra had 26 goals and 74 points to
finish third in team scoring. In five playoff games, Demitra had seven
assists. Demitra also spent time with Ottawa, as he scored four goals
and seven points in 16 games.
He began the 1995–96
season with PEI, as in 48 games, Demitra put up 28 goals and 81 points,
which earned him a promotion back to the NHL. With Ottawa, Demitra had
seven goals and 17 points in 31 games.
To start the 1996–97 season, Demtira was a contract hold-out with Ottawa. He played a game with HC Dukla Trenčín of the Slovak Extraliga, getting a goal and two points, before joining the Las Vegas Thunder of the IHL.
With the Thunder, Demitra had eight goals and 21 points in 22 games. On
27 November 1996, the Senators parted ways with Demitra, as Ottawa
traded him to the St. Louis Blues for Christer Olsson.[5]

St. Louis Blues

The St. Louis Blues assigned Demitra to the Grand Rapids Griffins of the IHL,
where in 42 games, Demitra had 20 goals and 50 points. He was called up
to the Blues, and played his first game with the club on 17 March 1997,
getting no points in a 3–2 loss to the Phoenix Coyotes. Demitra scored his first two goals with St. Louis on 3 April 1997, scoring twice against Tommy Salo in a 5–5 tie with the New York Islanders.
He finished the season appearing in eight games with St. Louis, scoring
three goals. Demitra made his NHL playoff debut on 16 April 1997,
recording his first playoff point, an assist, in the Blues 2–0 win over
the Detroit Red Wings. On 22 April 1997, Demitra scored his first playoff goal, beating Red Wings goaltender Mike Vernon, and added two assists in a 4–0 win over Detroit. Overall, Demitra had a goal and four points in six playoff games.
Demitra made the NHL full-time in 1997–98,
as he played in 61 games with St. Louis, scoring 22 goals and 52 points
to finish fifth in team scoring. In 10 playoff games, Demitra had three
goals and six points.
The 1998–99
was a break-out season for Demitra, as he finished tenth in NHL scoring
with 89 points, as he scored 37 goals and added 52 assists in 82 games.
Demitra appeared in the 1999 NHL All-Star Game held in Tampa Bay, Florida,
scoring a goal for the World team in a 8–6 loss to North America. In
the playoffs, Demitra added five goals and nine points in 13 games.
Demitra continued his success in 1999–2000, as he scored 27 goals and 75 points in 71 games to lead the Blues in scoring once again. Demitra played in the 2000 NHL All-Star Game held in Toronto, Ontario, where he scored two goals in a 9–4 World victory over North America. Demitra also scored his first career hat trick, scoring three goals against the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim
on 12 February 2000 in a 6–3 Blues victory. Demitra suffered a season
ending injury on 24 March 2000, and missed the playoffs. After the
season, he was awarded the Lady Byng Memorial Trophy after he accumulated only eight penalty minutes throughout the season.
Injuries cut short Demitra’s season in 2000–01
when he appeared in only 44 games with St. Louis. He scored 20 goals
and 45 points to finish fifth in team scoring. He scored a hat trick and
added two assists for a five point game against the New York Rangers
on 20 December 2000 in a 6–3 win. Less than a week later, on 26
December 2000, Demitra had another high scoring game, scoring two goals
and four points against the Columbus Blue Jackets
in a 5–0 victory. On 30 December 2000, Demitra suffered an injury,
however, he came back with the team late in the season, and appeared in
15 playoff games, scoring two goals and six points.
In 2001–02,
Demitra was healthy, as he appeared in all 82 games for St. Louis,
scoring 35 goals and 78 points to lead the team in scoring and finish
seventh in the league scoring race. Demitra had a league high ten game
winning goals. He had a four point night against his former team, the Ottawa Senators, on 27 November 2001, scoring two goals and two assists in a 4–2 victory. Demitra appeared in the 2002 NHL All-Star Game held in Los Angeles, California,
however, he was held off the scoresheet in a 8–5 World win over North
America. In the playoffs, Demitra appeared in 10 games, scoring four
goals and 11 points. He had a four point night against the Detroit Red Wings on 7 May 2002, scoring a goal and three assists in the Blues 6–1 victory.
The 2002–03
was Demitra’s most productive in the NHL, as he set a career high with
93 points, which placed him sixth in NHL scoring, as Demtira scored 36
goals and 57 assists in 78 games. He had a hat trick and a season high
four points on 29 November 2002 in a 7–2 win over the Calgary Flames. In the playoffs, Demitra had two goals and six points in seven games.
Demitra had a disappointing 2003–04
season, scoring 23 goals and 58 points, his lowest totals since his
injury plagued 2000–01 season, in 68 games. In the playoffs, Demitra had
a goal in five contests. This would be his final season with the Blues,
as Demitra left the team fifth in franchise scoring with 493 points in
494 games.

HC Dukla Trenčin

With the 2004-05 NHL lockout cancelling the season, Demitra signed with HC Dukla Trenčín of the Slovak Extraliga
on 17 September 2004. Demitra led the league in scoring with 28 goals
and 82 points in 54 games. Demitra scored four goals and 17 points in 12
playoff games with the team.


Pavol Demitra with the Los Angeles Kings.

Los Angeles Kings

On 2 August 2005, Demitra signed a three year, $13.5 million contract with the Los Angeles Kings.[6] On 5 October 2005, Demitra played his first game with the Kings, scoring an assist in a 5–4 loss to the Dallas Stars. The next night, on 6 October 2005, Demitra scored his first goal with his new team, scoring against David LeNeveu of the Phoenix Coyotes
in a 3–2 win. Demitra had three four-point games during the season,
including one on 22 November 2005 against his former team, the St. Louis Blues
in a 6–3 Los Angeles win. Demitra missed 24 games with injuries,
including an eye problem, during the season. In 58 games during the season, Demitra had 25 goals and 62 points to finish third in team scoring. On 24 June 2006, Los Angeles traded Demitra to the Minnesota Wild for Patrick O’Sullivan and a first round draft pick in the 2006 NHL Entry Draft.

Minnesota Wild

Demitra joined the Wild and fellow Slovak Marián Gáborík for the 2006–07 season. Demitra played his first game with the Wild on 5 October 2006, recording two assists in a 3–2 win over the Colorado Avalanche. In his next game on 7 October 2006, Demitra scored his first goal with Minnesota, scoring against Tomáš Vokoun of the Nashville Predators
in a 6–5 victory. Demitra finished the season tied for first in team
scoring, as he had 25 goals and 64 points in 71 games. The 64 points
were the highest by Demitra since 2002–03. Demitra played in his first
playoff game with Minnesota on 11 April 2007, scoring a goal against Ilya Bryzgalov of the Anaheim Ducks in a 2–1 loss. Demitra appeared in five playoff games, scoring a goal and four points.
Demitra was named the captain of the Wild for the month of October 2007[7] as part of the Wild’s rotating captaincy to begin the 2007–08
season. Demitra had a tough season, scoring only 15 goals, his lowest
total since 1996–97, and 54 points through 68 games as he finished
fourth in team scoring. In the playoffs, Demitra had a goal and three
points in six games. At the end of the season, he became an unrestricted
free agent.

Vancouver Canucks

On 10 July 2008, Demitra signed a two-year, $8 million contract with the Vancouver Canucks.[8] He played in his first game as a Canuck on 9 October 2008, getting no points in a 6–0 win over the Calgary Flames. In his next game, also against Calgary, Demitra scored his first goal with Vancouver, the game winning overtime goal against Miikka Kiprusoff
in a 5–4 win. He finished the season with 20 goals and 53 points in 69
games, finishing fourth in team scoring. Demitra appeared in his first
playoff game with Vancouver on 15 April 2009, recording an assist in a
2–1 win over the St. Louis Blues. Demitra scored his first playoff goal with the Canucks on 30 April 2009, scoring against Nikolai Khabibulin of the Chicago Blackhawks
in a 5–3 victory. On 2 May 2009, Demitra suffered a shoulder injury
against the Blackhawks that would end his season. In six playoff games,
Demitra had a goal and three points.
The 2009–10
would be a tough season on Demitra, as he missed most of the regular
season with the shoulder injury that occurred in the 2009 playoffs. In
28 games, Demitra had three goals and 16 points, his lowest totals since
1996–97. In the playoffs, Demitra had a three point game against the Los Angeles Kings
on 23 April 2010, helping Vancouver to a 7–2 win. Overall, Demitra
appeared in 11 playoff games, scoring two goals and six points. After
the season, he became an unrestricted free agent. This would mark the
end of Demitra’s NHL career. He’d played in 847 career games, and scored
304 goals with 464 assists for 768 points.

Lokomotiv Yaroslavl

Demitra joined Lokomotiv Yaroslavl of the KHL
on 15 July 2010. In his first season with Lokomotiv, Demitra scored 18
goals and 60 points in 54 games to finish fifth in league scoring. He
was named Forward of the Month in January 2011. In 18 playoff games with
Yaroslavl, Demitra had six goals and 15 assists for 21 points which
placed him second in KHL playoff scoring.
Demitra returned to the team for the 2011–12 season, however, on 7 September 2011, he was killed in a plane crash along with most of his teammates.

International play

Medal record

Demitra faces off with Henrik Sedin (both of the Vancouver Canucks) during the 2010 Olympics
Men’s ice hockey
Competitor for  Slovakia
World Championships
Bronze 2003 Finland
Competitor for  Czechoslovakia
World Junior Championships
Bronze 1993 Sweden

Demitra was named to Team Slovakia for the 2010 Winter Olympics in his NHL hometown Vancouver. On 18 February 2010, he scored in the seventh round of a shootout to help Slovakia beat Russia in the round robin.[9]
In the semi-finals against hosts Canada, Slovakia trailed 3–0 after two
periods but rallied with 2 goals in the third period, and Demitra
nearly scored with 9 seconds remained in regulation but his shot was
stopped by Canucks teammate Roberto Luongo, and the save was dubbed the “Glove from Above”.[10] In the bronze medal game against Finland,
Demitra assisted twice and scored once in the second period to help his
team to a 3–1 lead, though they could not hold on as Finland scored
four times (including an empty-net goal) in the third period to claim
bronze. Slovakia was ranked in fourth place, as Demitra led the
tournament in points with 10 and tied for the lead in assists with
seven. His play in the tournament led him to a selection to the all-star
team.[11]
Demitra played for Czechoslovakia in the following competitions:

Demitra has played for Slovakia in the following competitions:

Awards and achievements

Death


Tribute to Pavol Demitra, Ondrej Nepela Arena, Bratislava, Slovakia.

The 2011 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl plane crash occurred on 7 September
2011, at 4:02 PM local time, when a Yakovlev Yak-42 passenger aircraft,
carrying the entire hockey team of Lokomotiv Yaroslavl of the
Kontinental Hockey League (KHL), crashed near Yaroslavl, Russia, on its
way to Minsk, Belarus, to start the 2011–12 KHL season.[1]
The entire club’s roster was killed in the plane crash. The airplane
caught fire and crashed shortly after take-off, merely 4 kilometers from
the Tunoshna
airport. Preliminary reports say that 43 of the 45 passengers on board
had been killed, including the entire roster and 4 youth players,[12] and that the remaining one (Alexander Galimov) was in critical condition. However, Galimov died a few days later.[13] Demitra’s agent, Matt Keator, confirmed his client’s death.[14][15]
Demitra was survived by his wife Maja and two children, Lucas and Zara. He was predeceased by his infant son, Tobias.[16]

Career statistics

Regular season and playoffs

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1991–92 ZTS Dubnica CSFR-2 28 13 10 23 12
1992–93 ZTS Dubnica CSFR-2 4 3 0 3 2
1992–93 HC Dukla Trenčín Czechoslovak 46 10 18 28
1993–94 Ottawa Senators NHL 12 1 1 2 4
1993–94 PEI Senators AHL 41 18 23 41 8
1994–95 Ottawa Senators NHL 16 4 3 7 0
1994–95 PEI Senators AHL 61 26 48 74 23 5 0 7 7 0
1995–96 Ottawa Senators NHL 31 7 10 17 6
1995–96 PEI Senators AHL 48 28 53 81 44
1996–97 HC Dukla Trenčín Slovak 1 1 1 2
1996–97 Las Vegas Thunder IHL 22 8 13 21 10
1996–97 Grand Rapids Griffins IHL 42 20 30 50 24
1996–97 St. Louis Blues NHL 8 3 0 3 2 6 1 3 4 6
1997–98 St. Louis Blues NHL 61 22 30 52 22 10 3 3 6 2
1998–99 St. Louis Blues NHL 82 37 52 89 16 13 5 4 9 4
1999–00 St. Louis Blues NHL 71 28 47 75 8
2000–01 St. Louis Blues NHL 44 20 25 45 16 15 2 4 6 2
2001–02 St. Louis Blues NHL 82 35 43 78 46 10 4 7 11 6
2002–03 St. Louis Blues NHL 78 36 57 93 32 7 2 4 6 2
2003–04 St. Louis Blues NHL 68 23 35 58 18 5 1 0 1 4
2004–05 HC Dukla Trenčín Slovak 54 28 54 82 39 12 4 13 17 14
2005–06 Los Angeles Kings NHL 58 25 37 62 42
2006–07 Minnesota Wild NHL 71 25 39 64 28 5 1 3 4 0
2007–08 Minnesota Wild NHL 68 15 39 54 24 6 1 2 3 2
2008–09 Vancouver Canucks NHL 69 20 33 53 20 6 1 2 3 2
2009–10 Vancouver Canucks NHL 28 3 13 16 0 11 2 4 6 4
2010–11 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl KHL 54 18 42 60 29 18 6 15 21 4
NHL totals 847 304 464 768 284 94 23 36 59 34

All-Star Games

Year Location G A P
1999 Tampa 1 0 1
2000 Toronto 2 0 2
2002 Los Angeles 0 0 0
All-Star totals 3 0 3

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Robert Dietrich, German, died from a plane crash he was 25

Robert Dietrich was a professional ice hockey defenceman died from a plane crash he was 25.. He was killed in the 2011 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl air disaster, in which all players and coaches onboard the plane from the club perished.

(July 25, 1986 – September 7, 2011) 

Playing career

Dietrich was drafted 174th overall in the 6th round of the 2007 NHL Entry Draft by the Nashville Predators. He played with the DEG Metro Stars of the DEL from 2005 to the 2008. On July 16, 2007, Dietrich was signed to a three-year entry level contract with the Predators.[1]
He was re-assigned on loan to the Metro Stars for his first year of the
contract, before he spent the final two seasons in North America with
the Predators American Hockey League affiliate, the Milwaukee Admirals.


Robert Dietrich in 2010 Men’s World Ice Hockey Championships

In his second year with the Admirals in 2009–10,
he led the team with 43 points for defenseman, but was unable to appear
in the NHL with Nashville. On June 8, 2010, Dietrich returned to
Germany and signed a two-year contract with Adler Mannheim.[2]

Death

On September 7, 2011, he was killed when a Yakovlev Yak-42 passenger
aircraft, carrying nearly his entire Lokomotiv team, crashed just
outside Yaroslavl, Russia. The team was traveling to Minsk
to play their opening game of the season, with its coaching staff and
prospects. Lokomotiv officials said “everyone from the main roster was
on the plane plus four players from the youth team.”[3][4][5]

Career statistics

Regular season and playoffs

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
2003–04 EC Peiting 3.GBun 31 4 7 11 40 11 1 2 3 43
2004–05 ETC Crimmitschau 2.GBun 45 3 14 17 34
2005–06 DEG Metro Stars DEL 4 0 0 0 2
2005–06 Straubing Tigers 2.GBun 46 5 3 8 55 15 0 1 1 8
2006–07 DEG Metro Stars DEL 52 3 19 22 28 9 2 4 6 22
2007–08 DEG Metro Stars DEL 9 1 1 2 12 13 1 2 3 4
2008–09 Milwaukee Admirals AHL 63 4 15 19 32 11 1 7 8 2
2009–10 Milwaukee Admirals AHL 79 6 37 43 28 2 0 1 1 2
2010–11 Adler Mannheim DEL 42 3 15 18 69 6 0 2 2 8
DEL totals 107 7 35 42 111 28 3 8 11 34

International

Year Team Comp GP G A Pts PIM
2004 Germany WJC18-D1 5 0 4 4 4
2005 Germany WJC 6 0 0 0 6
2006 Germany WJC-D1 5 0 1 1 4
2007 Germany WC 6 2 2 4 2
2010 Germany WC 9 0 0 0 2
2011 Germany WC 7 0 0 0 0
Junior int’l totals 16 0 5 5 14
Senior int’l totals 22 2 2 4 4

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Marat Kalimulin, Russian, died from a plane crash he was 23

Marat Natfulovich Kalimulin  was a Russian professional ice hockey defenceman who played for Lokomotiv Yaroslavl of the Kontinental Hockey League (KHL) died from a plane crash he was 23..[1] He was killed in the 2011 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl air disaster, in which almost all players and coaches from the club perished.

(August 20, 1988 – September 7, 2011)

Death

On September 7, 2011, Kalimulin was killed in the 2011 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl air disaster,
when a Yakovlev Yak-42 passenger aircraft, carrying nearly his entire
Lokomotiv team, crashed just outside Yaroslavl, Russia. The team was
traveling to Minsk
to play their opening game of the season, with its coaching staff and
prospects. Lokomotiv officials said “‘everyone from the main roster was
on the plane plus four players from the youth team.’”[2][3][4]

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Alexander Kalyanin, Russian, died from a plane crash he was 23.

Alexander Igorevich was a Russian professional ice hockey winger who played for Lokomotiv Yaroslavl of the Kontinental Hockey League (KHL)  died from a plane crash he was 23..

(September 24, 1987 – September 7, 2011)

Death

On September 7, 2011, Kalyanin was killed in the 2011 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl air disaster,
when a Yakovlev Yak-42 passenger aircraft, carrying nearly his entire
Lokomotiv team, crashed just outside Yaroslavl, Russia. The team was
traveling to Minsk
to play their opening game of the season, with its coaching staff and
prospects. Lokomotiv officials said “‘everyone from the main roster was
on the plane plus four players from the youth team.’”[2][3][4]

To see more of who died in 2011 click here


Alexander Karpovtsev, Russian coach, world champion (as player, 1993), Stanley Cup champion (as player, 1994, with New York Rangers), died from a plane crash he was 41

Alexander Karpovtsev was a Russian ice hockey player and later an assistant coach for Ak Bars Kazan and Lokomotiv Yaroslavl of the Kontinental Hockey League (KHL)  died from a plane crash he was 41.. In the National Hockey League (NHL), he played for the New York Rangers, Toronto Maple Leafs, Chicago Blackhawks, New York Islanders, and Florida Panthers. He, Alexei Kovalev, Sergei Zubov and Sergei Nemchinov, were the first Russian players to have their names engraved on the Stanley Cup, winning it in 1994
with the Rangers. Alexander Karpovtsev was married to Janna Karpovtsev
and had two daughters named Dasha born in 1993, and Stacy born in 2000.[1]
Karpovtsev was an assistant coach for Lokomotiv Yaroslavl when his team’s charter plane crashed on September 7, 2011 and did not survive.[2]

(April 7, 1970 – September 7, 2011)

Death

On September 7, 2011, Karpovtsev was killed when a Yakovlev Yak-42
passenger aircraft, carrying nearly his entire Lokomotiv team, crashed
just outside Yaroslavl, Russia. The team was traveling to Minsk
to play their opening game of the season, with its coaching staff and
prospects. Lokomotiv officials said “‘everyone from the main roster was
on the plane plus four players from the youth team.’”[3][4][5][6]

Transactions

  • October 2, 2000– Traded by the Toronto Maple Leafs, along with Toronto’s 2001 fourth-round draft choice, to the Chicago Blackhawks in exchange for Bryan McCabe.
  • March 9, 2004– Traded by the Chicago Blackhawks to the New York Islanders in exchange for New York’s 2005 fourth-round draft choice.

Career statistics

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1987–88 HC Dynamo Moscow RSL 2 0 1 1 0
1989–90 HC Dynamo Moscow RSL 35 1 1 2 27
1990–91 HC Dynamo Moscow RSL 40 0 5 5 15
1991–92 HC Dynamo Moscow RSL 28 3 2 5 22
1992–93 HC Dynamo Moscow RSL 36 3 11 14 100
1993–94 HC Dynamo Moscow RSL 3 0 0 0 6
1993–94 New York Rangers NHL 67 3 15 18 58 17 0 4 4 12
1994–95 HC Dynamo Moscow RSL 13 0 2 2 10
1994–95 New York Rangers NHL 47 4 8 12 30 8 1 0 1 0
1995–96 New York Rangers NHL 40 2 16 18 26 6 0 1 1 4
1996–97 New York Rangers NHL 77 9 29 38 59 13 1 3 4 20
1997–98 New York Rangers NHL 47 3 7 10 48
1998–99 New York Rangers NHL 2 1 0 1 0
1998–99 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 56 2 25 27 52 14 1 3 4 12
1999–00 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 69 3 14 17 54 11 0 3 3 4
2000–01 HC Dynamo Moscow RSL 5 0 1 1 0
2000–01 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 53 2 13 15 39
2001–02 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 65 1 9 10 40 5 1 0 1 0
2002–03 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 40 4 10 14 12
2003–04 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 24 0 7 7 14
2003–04 New York Islanders NHL 3 0 1 1 4
2004–05 Sibir Novosibirsk RSL 5 0 1 1 16
2004–05 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl RSL 33 2 4 6 45 9 0 0 0 0
2005–06 Florida Panthers NHL 6 0 0 0 4
2005–06 Sibir Novosibirsk RSL 18 2 1 3 39 3 0 0 0 4
2006–07 Sibir Novosibirsk RSL 39 5 13 18 90 7 1 2 3 8
NHL totals 596 34 154 188 430 74 4 14 18 52

International statistics

Year Team Event Place GP G A Pts PIM
1990 Soviet Union WJC 2 7 0 1 1 8
1993 Russia WC 1 8 0 1 1 10
1996 Russia WCH SF 1 0 0 0 0
2005 Russia WC 3 8 0 1 1 2
Senior int’l totals 17 0 2 2 12

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Andrei Kiryukhin, Russian, died in a plane crash he was 24.

Andrei Anatolievich Kiryukhin  was a Russian professional ice hockey winger who played for Lokomotiv Yaroslavl of the Kontinental Hockey League (KHL)  died in a plane crash he was  24.
Besides Lokomotiv, he also played for Lokomotiv-2 (its farm team), Belgorod and Kapitan teams.
Playing for Russia at the 2007 World Junior Ice Hockey Championships he won a silver medal.
His father Anatoly Kiryukhin was a football player and coach.

( August 4, 1987 – September 7, 2011)

Death

On September 7, 2011, Kiryukhin was killed in the 2011 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl air disaster,
when a Yakovlev Yak-42 passenger aircraft, carrying nearly his entire
Lokomotiv team, crashed just outside Yaroslavl, Russia. The team was
traveling to Minsk
to play their opening game of the season, with its coaching staff and
prospects. Lokomotiv officials said “‘everyone from the main roster was
on the plane plus four players from the youth team.’”[2][3][4]

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Nikita Klyukin, Russian, world U18 champion (2007), died from a plane crash he was 21

Nikita Sergeyevich Klyukin was a Russian professional ice hockey centre who played for Lokomotiv Yaroslavl of the Kontinental Hockey League (KHL) died from a plane crash he was 21..[1]

(November 10, 1989 – September 7, 2011)

Death

On September 7, 2011, Klyukin was killed in the 2011 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl air disaster,
when a Yakovlev Yak-42 passenger aircraft, carrying nearly his entire
Lokomotiv team, crashed just outside Yaroslavl, Russia. The team was
traveling to Minsk
to play their opening game of the season, with its coaching staff and
prospects. Lokomotiv officials said “‘everyone from the main roster was
on the plane plus four players from the youth team.’”[2][3][4]

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Igor Korolev, Russian coach, died from a plane crash he was 41

Igor Borisovich Korolev  was a professional ice hockey player and coach. Korolev played over 700 games in the National Hockey League (NHL) from 1992 until 2004 died from a plane crash he was 41.. Korolev returned to Russia, and played a further seven seasons in the Russian Super League (RSL) and the Kontinental Hockey League (KHL) before retiring from active play in 2010. In 2011, Korolev accepted an assistant coach position with Lokomotiv Yaroslavl. Korolev was killed in the 2011 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl air disaster[1] along with nearly the entire roster of the Lokomotiv Yaroslavl of the Kontinental Hockey League for whom he was coaching. A native of the Russian Republic of the Soviet Union, Korolev became a naturalized Canadian citizen in 2000.[2][3]

(September 6, 1970 – September 7, 2011)

 Playing career

Korolev began his professional playing career with HC Dynamo Moscow
in the 1988–89 season appearing once. The following season, Korolev
became a full member of the team, playing 17 games. He played two
further full seasons with Dynamo. In all three seasons, Dynamo won the
league championship. Korolev was drafted by the St. Louis Blues in the second round, 38th overall in the 1992 NHL Entry Draft.
After five games with Dynamo in the 1992–93 season, Korolev left to
join the Blues. Korolev played for the Blues for two seasons. Korolev
was unsigned in the 1994–95 season and he returned to Dynamo. He was
picked up by the Winnipeg Jets on waivers in 1995 and stayed with the
team as it moved to Phoenix. He signed as a free agent with Toronto in
1997. He was traded to Chicago in 2001 where he played until 2004. He
then returned to Russia and signed with Lokomotiv Yaroslavl. After one
season, he transferred to Metallurg Magnitogorsk, where he played three
seasons. He played one season with Atlant Moscow Oblast and one final
season with Lokomotiv Yaroslavl where he retired after the 2009–10
season. He became an assistant coach with the team and was still an
assistant at the time of his death.

Death

Korolev died on September 7, 2011, when a Yakovlev Yak-42 passenger aircraft crashed just outside Yaroslavl, Russia while transporting Lokomotiv to Minsk
to play their opening game of the season. Lokomotiv officials said
“everyone from the main roster was on the plane plus four players from
the youth team.”[4][5][6] All aboard were killed, aside from one crew member.

Personal

Igor and Vera Korolev married in June 1990.[2] Igor and Vera have two daughters, Kristina and Anastasia. Korolev’s family has a permanent home in the North York district of Toronto, Canada. The Korolevs obtained Canadian citizenship in 2000.[2] Korolev was buried in Toronto[3] at Mount Pleasant Cemetery[7] after a funeral on September 18, 2011.[8] Korolev was the godfather of fellow NHL player Nik Antropov‘s son. Korolev and Antropov both played the 2000–01 season with the Toronto Maple Leafs.[9]

Honors

Career statistics

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1988–89 HC Dynamo Moscow RSL 1 0 0 0 2
1989–90 HC Dynamo Moscow RSL 17 3 2 5 2
1990–91 HC Dynamo Moscow RSL 38 12 4 16 12
1991–92 HC Dynamo Moscow RSL 33 12 8 20 10
1992–93 HC Dynamo Moscow RSL 5 1 2 3 4
1992–93 St. Louis Blues NHL 74 4 23 27 20 3 0 0 0 0
1993–94 St. Louis Blues NHL 73 6 10 16 40 2 0 0 0 0
1994–95 Winnipeg Jets NHL 45 8 22 30 10
1994–95 HC Dynamo Moscow RSL 13 4 6 10 18
1995–96 Winnipeg Jets NHL 73 22 29 51 42 6 0 3 3 0
1996–97 Phoenix Coyotes NHL 41 3 7 10 28 1 0 0 0 0
1996–97 Michigan K-Wings IHL 4 2 2 4 0
1996–97 Phoenix Roadrunners IHL 4 2 6 8 4
1997–98 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 78 17 22 39 22
1998–99 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 66 13 34 47 46 1 0 0 0 0
1999–00 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 80 20 26 46 22 12 0 4 4 6
2000–01 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 73 10 19 29 28 11 0 0 0 0
2001–02 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 82 9 20 29 20 5 0 1 1 0
2002–03 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 48 4 5 9 30
2002–03 Norfolk Admirals AHL 14 4 3 7 0 9 2 4 6 4
2003–04 Norfolk Admirals AHL 10 1 4 5 4
2003–04 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 62 3 10 13 22
2004–05 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl RSL 60 8 20 28 26 9 1 6 7 2
2005–06 Metallurg Magnitogorsk RSL 51 7 17 24 26 11 0 2 2 4
2006–07 Metallurg Magnitogorsk RSL 54 2 14 16 28 13 4 3 7 8
2007–08 Metallurg Magnitogorsk RSL 57 6 20 26 58 13 5 5 10 10
2008–09 Atlant Mytishchi KHL 56 7 15 22 46 7 0 1 1 10
2009–10 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl KHL 48 5 15 20 28 15 0 3 3 4
NHL totals 795 119 227 346 330 41 0 8 8 6

International statistics

Year Team Event Place GP G A Pts PIM
1991 Soviet Union CC 5th 5 0 0 0 0
1992 CIS WC 5th 6 2 1 3 2

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Stefan Liv, Swedish, Olympic gold medalist (2006), world champion (2006), died in a plane crash he was 30.

Stefan Daniel Patryk Liv, born Patryk Śliż, was a Polish-born Swedish professional ice hockey goaltender died in a plane crash he was 30.. Liv played professionally in Sweden, North America and Russia. Liv played nine seasons for HV71
in Sweden. He played one season of minor league hockey in North America
then returned to Europe. Upon his return, he played three seasons in
Sweden, then moved to Russia in 2009. He was a member of Lokomotiv Yaroslavl of the KHL when he died with the rest of the team in a plane crash. He was a member of several Swedish national teams, including the 2006 Olympic championship team.

(21 December 1980 – 7 September 2011)

  Personal

Liv was born in Gdynia, Poland, as Patryk Śliz, given to an orphanage in Gdańsk and adopted by a Swedish family around the age of two. He kept his original first name as a second first name.[1][2]

Playing career

Liv was the starting goaltender for HC Sibir and was often chosen for the Swedish national team. On 22 December 2005, he was named as third goaltender to Team Sweden for the 2006 Winter Olympics.[3]
He wore the goaltender’s glove on his left hand. He was agile, quick in
moving from side to side and skilled with close-range shots,[4] and his unorthodox style reminded some of Dominik Hašek.[5]
Liv played his first Elitserien game in Sweden on 18 January 2000 in Jönköping for HV71 against Luleå HF. His first national appearance was in a match against the Czech Republic, also in Jönköping, on 9 November 2000. Liv was drafted in the 2000 NHL Entry Draft by the Detroit Red Wings in the third round, 102nd overall.[6]
Liv signed a one-year contract with the Red Wings in May 2006,[5] but started season 2006–07 playing for the Grand Rapids Griffins of the American Hockey League (AHL).[7] He was recalled by the Red Wings on 17 November 2006.[8] On 26 November 2006, Liv was back with the Grand Rapids playing against Houston Aeros. Two days later, Liv was assigned to the Toledo Storm in ECHL when the Grand Rapids recalled goalie Logan Koopmans.[9] He was later recalled by Grand Rapids.
After one season with the Detroit Red Wings’ organization, playing
mostly for Grand Rapids, totaling a save percentage of .895 over 34
games, he signed a three-year contract with his former Swedish club
HV71.[10] He continued the 2007–08 season by winning the Swedish Championship and was awarded the Guldpucken
as the Player of the Year in the Elitserien. Season 2009-10 Liv played
again at HV 71, and he was selected to Swedens Olympic team for
Vancouver Olympics 2010, where he was third goalie after New York
Rangers Henrik Lundvist and Toronto Maple Leafs Jonas Gustavsson. Season
2010-11 Liv played at Sibir Novosibirsk in KHL, and was selected KHL
All-star game 2011. For season 2011-12 Liv moved to Lokomotiv Yaroslavl.
[11]

Death

On 7 September 2011, Liv was killed when a Yakovlev Yak-42 passenger aircraft, carrying nearly his entire Lokomotiv team, crashed just outside Yaroslavl, Russia. The team was traveling to Minsk
to play their opening game of the season, with its coaching staff and
prospects. Lokomotiv officials said “‘everyone from the main roster was
on the plane plus four players from the youth team.’”[12][13][14]
As a result of Liv’s death, the premier round games of the 2011–12 Elitserien season, between 13–15 September, began with a one-minute silence.[15] In honour, his No. 1 jersey will be retired and raised to the rafters by HV71 in Kinnarps Arena prior to HV71′s home game against Timrå IK on 10 January 2012.[16][17] To remember Liv throughout the 2011–12 season, all player jerseys in HV71′s team carry number 1 on the front.[18] On 10 September 2011, over 10,000 fans of HV71 attended Kinnarps Arena, HV71′s home arena, to honor Stefan Liv.[19]
In their 2011 season opener, each member of the Detroit Red Wings wore a patch bearing “BM*RS*SL” to honor the memories of Liv, Lokomotiv coach Brad McCrimmon, and defenseman Ruslan Salei.[20] Detroit goalie Jimmy Howard also paid a personal tribute to the three men on the back of his mask.[21] Liv and Howard had shared goaltending duties during Liv’s season with the Grand Rapids Griffins.[22]
Liv’s body was buried at the Sofiakyrkan church in Jönköping on 2 October 2011, with 120 friends and relatives arriving at the scene and leaving one rose flower each on Liv’s coffin.[23][24]

Awards

  • Nominated to the Elitserien Rookie of the Year in 2001.
  • Named to the Elitserien All-Star Game in 2002.
  • Bronze medal at the Ice Hockey World Championships in 2002.
  • Awarded the Honken Trophy (Swedish Goaltender of the Year) in 2002.
  • Silver medal at the Ice Hockey World Championships in 2004.
  • Elitserien playoff winner with HV71 in 2004 and 2008.
  • Gold medal at the Winter Olympics in 2006.
  • Gold medal at the Ice Hockey World Championship in 2006.
  • Awarded Guldpucken (Swedish Player of the Year) in 2008.
  • Named to the Swedish All-Star Team in 2008.
  • Elitserien playoff silver medal with HV71 in 2009.
  • Bronze medal at the Ice Hockey World Championships in 2009.

Records

  • Elitserien record for shutouts in playoffs (5) — (four during the finals)
  • Elitserien record for career shutouts (37)
  • HV71′s club record for total minutes played (13,231)
  • HV71′s club record for shutouts in a season (6)
  • HV71′s club record for career GAA (2.17)

Career statistics

Regular season

Season Team League GP W L T MIN GA SO GAA
1999–00 HV71 SEL 12 716 25 0 2.09
2000–01 HV71 SEL 46 2,752 127 4 2.77
2001–02 HV71 SEL 38 2,184 95 4 2.61
2002–03 HV71 SEL 46 2,723 124 3 2.73
2003–04 HV71 SEL 41 2,451 91 6 2.23
2004–05 HV71 SEL 40 2,404 119 2 2.97
2005–06 HV71 SEL 40 2,406 87 4 2.17
2006–07 Grand Rapids Griffins AHL 34 15 15 0 1,893 95 2 3.01
2006–07 Toledo Storm ECHL 3 1 1 1 184 7 0 2.29
2007–08 HV71 SEL 48 26 11 11 2,785 105 5 2.26
2008–09 HV71 SEL 35 15 9 11 2,001 86 1 2.58
2009–10 HV71 SEL 43 2,542 110 4 2.60
2010–11 HC Sibir KHL 39 19 16 2 2,276 84 4 2.21
SEL totals 389 22,964 969 33 2.49
KHL totals 39 19 16 2 2,276 84 4 2.21
ECHL totals 3 1 1 1 184 7 0 2.29
AHL totals 34 15 15 0 1,893 95 2 3.01

Statistics as of the end of the Elitserien regular season 2008–09.[4][25][26]

Post-season

Season Team League GP W L T MIN GA SO GAA
1999–00 HV71 SEL 3 1 2 0 178 12 0 4.04
2001–02 HV71 SEL 8 4 4 0 517 27 0 3.13
2002–03 HV71 SEL 7 3 4 0 391 17 1 2.61
2003–04 HV71 SEL 18 12 6 0 1,091 35 5 1.92
2005–06 HV71 SEL 12 7 5 0 668 38 0 3.41
2007–08 HV71 SEL 17 12 5 0 1,020 31 3 1.82
2008–09 HV71 SEL 18 9 8 0 1,111 35 1 1.89
SEL totals 83 48 34 0 4,976 195 10 2.48

Statistics as of the end of Elitserien playoffs 2009.[4][25]

International play

Liv has played for Sweden in:

International statistics

Year Team Event GP W L T MIN GA SO GAA
2002 Sweden WC 2 2 0 0 120 3 1 1.50
2004 Sweden WC 1 1 0 0 60 1 0 1.00
2006 Sweden Oly 1 1 0 0 60 2 0 2.00
2006 Sweden WC 1 1 0 0 60 0 1 0.00
2008 Sweden WC 3 1 2 0 178 6 1 2.02
Senior int’l totals 8 6 2 0 478 12 3 1.51

Statistics as of 17 May 2008.[4][25]

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Jan Marek, Czech, died from plane crash he was 31.

Jan Marek  was a Czech professional ice hockey centre, playing for HC CSKA Moscow of the Kontinental Hockey League (KHL)  died from plane crash he was 31.. He was selected by the New York Rangers in the 8th round (243rd overall) of the 2003 NHL Entry Draft.
Marek led the KHL in goals scored in the 2008–09 KHL season with 35.

(December 31, 1979 – September 7, 2011)

Death

On September 7, 2011, he died when a Yakovlev Yak-42 passenger aircraft, carrying nearly the entire Lokomotiv team, crashed just outside Yaroslavl, Russia. The team was traveling to Minsk
to play their opening game of the season, with its coaching staff and
prospects. Lokomotiv officials said “everyone from the main roster was
on the plane plus four players from the youth team.”[1][2][3]

Career statistics

                                          --- Regular season ---  ---- Playoffs ----
Season   Team                        Lge    GP    G    A  Pts  PIM  GP   G   A Pts PIM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1998-99  HC Oceláři Třinec           Czech  32    2    2    4    2   6   0   0  0   0
1999-00  HC Oceláři Třinec           Czech  32    1    5    6    4   2   0   0  0   0
2000-01  HC Oceláři Třinec           Czech  38    7    4   11    2  --  --  --  --  --
2001-02  HC Oceláři Třinec           Czech  52    13  27   40   44   6   1   3   4   6
2002-03  HC Oceláři Třinec           Czech  51    32  30   62   42  12   6   4   10  22
2003-04  Sparta Praha                Czech  50    21  30   51   62  11   4   9   13  26
2004-05  Sparta Praha                Czech  38     7  21   28   26   5   2   2   4   2
2005-06  Sparta Praha                Czech  48    22  32   54   66  17   4   4   8   24
2006-07  Magnitogorsk Metallurg      Russia 47    17  30   47   70  13   6   8  14   8
2007-08  Magnitogorsk Metallurg      Russia 49    16  31   47   40  11   4   3  7    2
2008-09  Magnitogorsk Metallurg      KHL    53    35  36   71   62  12   6   4  10   26
2009-10  Magnitogorsk Metallurg      KHL    35    7   12   19   14  10   3   1   4   4
2010-11  CSKA Moscow*                KHL    46    14  24   38   46
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Czech totals                                311  105  155  260  510 76  17  26  39   80  
Russia totals                                96   33   61   94  110 24  10  11  21   10
KHL totals                                  134   56   72  128  122 22   9   5  14   30
*= Not on active roster

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Brad McCrimmon, Canadian coach, Stanley Cup champion (as player, 1989, with Calgary Flames), died from a plane crash he was 52.

Byron Brad McCrimmon was a Canadian professional ice hockey defenceman and coach. He played over 1200 games in the National Hockey League (NHL) for the Boston Bruins, Philadelphia Flyers, Calgary Flames, Detroit Red Wings, Hartford Whalers and Phoenix Coyotes between 1979 and 1997. He achieved his greatest success in Calgary, where he was named a second team All-Star in 1987–88, played in the 1988 NHL All-Star Game and won the Plus-Minus Award with a league leading total of +48 . In 1989, he helped the Flames win their first Stanley Cup championship.
McCrimmon turned to coaching following his playing career, serving as an assistant with the New York Islanders before taking over as head coach of the Western Hockey League‘s Saskatoon Blades for two seasons between 1998 and 2000. He then returned to the NHL as an assistant, first with the Flames then the Atlanta Trashers and finally the Red Wings. He left the NHL to become the head coach of Lokomotiv Yaroslavl of the Kontinental Hockey League (KHL) in 2011. He never coached a regular season game however, as he was killed in the Lokomotiv Yaroslavl air disaster along with most of the team after their plane crashed en route to their first game.

(March 29, 1959 – September 7, 2011) 

Playing career

Junior

McCrimmon began his junior career at the age of 15 with the Prince Albert Raiders of the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League (SJHL). He played two seasons with the team, scoring 23 goals and 84 points.[1] In his second season, 1975–76, he was named the SJHL’s defenceman of the year.[2] For the 1976–77 season, he moved up to the Brandon Wheat Kings of the Western Canada Hockey League
(WCHL). He scored 84 points in 72 games in his first WCHL season and
added 13 points in 15 playoff games as the Wheat Kings reached the
league championship series, only to lose to the New Westminster Bruins.[3] McCrimmon scored 97 points in 1977–78 and 98 in 1978–79. He was named the defenceman of the year in 1978 and was named to the league all-star team in both seasons.[4][5] He also joined the Canadian junior team at the World Junior Championship in each season. He scored two assists in six games to help Canada win a bronze medal at the 1978 tournament, and had three points in five games in 1979 though Canada failed to medal.[6]
With McCrimmon as team captain,[7] the Wheat Kings again reached the league championship in 1978–79. He scored 28 points in 22 games to help Brandon win the President’s Cup.[1][8] The team advanced to the 1979 Memorial Cup tournament where it reached the final against the Ontario Hockey League champion Peterborough Petes. While McCrimmon routinely played a high number of minutes each game – his teammates marveled at his stamina –[9]
in that final, he played virtually every minute of the game. His total
ice time was 60 minutes, 38 seconds, and he was off the ice only to
serve a two-minute penalty.[10] Peterborough won the game, 2–1 in overtime, after McCrimmon lost the puck on a play he thought was icing was not called. Peterborough’s Terry Bovair stole the puck from him and scored the championship winning goal.[11] Despite the loss, he was named a tournament all-star on defence.[8]

Professional

At the 1979 NHL Entry Draft, considered one of the deepest in league history, McCrimmon was selected 15th overall by the Boston Bruins.[12] He made his NHL debut on October 11, 1979, in the team’s opening night victory over the Winnipeg Jets.[13] He scored 5 goals and 16 points in his rookie season of 1978–79 and improved to 11 goals and 29 points in his second season.[8] With only nine points in the 1981–82 season, McCrimmon had gained a reputation as a player who did not attack with the puck in the NHL.[14] Following the retirement of Rogie Vachon, the Bruins needed a new goaltender.[8] They sent McCrimmon to the Philadelphia Flyers in exchange for Pete Peeters on June 9, 1982.[14]
Flyers’ coach Bob McCammon argued that McCrimmon had been “intimidated” by playing with fellow 1979 Bruins pick and all-star, Ray Bourque, and that he could be a better overall defenceman.[15] McCrimmon’s offence improved in his first two seasons in Philadelphia – 25 points in 1982–83 and 24, though without a goal scored, in 1983–84[8] but he established himself as a top shutdown defenceman with the Flyers.[16] He recorded 43 points in 1984–85 and posted a plus-minus rating of +52, fifth best in the NHL.[17] McCrimmon was knocked out of the 1985 Stanley Cup Playoffs in the third game of the league semi-final against the Quebec Nordiques when he suffered a third-degree separation of his left shoulder following a hard hit by Wilf Paiement, an injury that required surgery to repair.[18] The Flyers reached the final without McCrimmon, but were defeated by the Edmonton Oilers for the Stanley Cup.[19] McCrimmon returned to start the 1985–86 season
which he had his best season statistically. He appeared in all 80 games
for the Flyers and set career highs of 13 goals, 43 assists, 56 points
and his plus-minus rating of +83 was second only to defensive partner Mark Howe.[16] He was named recipient of the Barry Ashbee Trophy as the Flyers’ top defenceman.[20]
He refused to report to the team for the start of the 1986–87 season.
After he was unable to come to terms on a new contract the season
before, an arbitrator was required to resolve the impasse. The
arbitrator sided with the team, setting a contract at the Flyers’ offer
of US$165,000
for that season (he asked for $200,000), with an option to extend the
deal for 1986–87. Though he admitted he was under contract for the
season, McCrimmon refused to play unless a new deal was reached. When
the two sides were unable to agree on the length of a contract,
McCrimmon went home to Saskatchewan as the season began.[21]
The Flyers suspended McCrimmon on September 26, 1986, after he refused
to appear in the first exhibition games. The impasse was not resolved
until a month later, when he and the team agreed to a one-year contract
on October 29.[22]
He immediately returned to the team and appeared in 72 of the Flyers’
80 games, recording 22 points and finishing fourth in the league at +45.[17] In the 1987 Stanley Cup Playoffs, he appeared in all 26 post-season games as the Flyers again reached the final against Edmonton. McCrimmon scored the overtime winner in game 3 of the final, but the Oilers won the series.[20]
Following the season, general manager Bobby Clarke refused to sign a new deal with McCrimmon, choosing instead to trade him to the Calgary Flames on August 27, 1987, in exchange for a third round selection at the 1988 NHL Entry Draft and a first rounder at the 1989 Draft.[23] On the 1987–88 Flames, McCrimmon joined the likes of Al MacInnis, Paul Reinhart, Gary Suter and Ric Nattress to form one of the top defences in the NHL.[24] He scored 42 points for the Flames, won the NHL Plus-Minus Award with a league-leading +48 and was named a second team All-Star. Additionally, he played in the 1988 All-Star Game.[7]
McCrimmon recorded only 22 points in 1988–89 – his lowest in seven seasons – but led all NHL defencemen with a +43 rating.[7] He appeared in all 22 playoff games for the Flames as the team defeated the Montreal Canadiens to win the first Stanley Cup championship in franchise history.[25] Upon the retirement of captains Lanny McDonald following the Cup win, and Jim Peplinski early in the 1989–90 season, McCrimmon was named the 10th captain in Flames history on November 3, 1989.[26] He scored 4 goals and 19 points on the season but fell out of favour with head coach Terry Crisp as the two disagreed over how the team’s defencemen were used.[27] The Flames chose to trade him following the season, sending him to the Detroit Red Wings on June 15, 1990, in exchange for a second round draft pick.[8]
In 1991–92, McCrimmon was paired with a young Nicklas Lidström. Though he played more of a “stay-at-home” defensive style,[28] McCrimmon’s 29 points was a significant improvement on the 13 he scored the season before.[17] McCrimmon played one more season in Detroit before again being traded, this time to the Hartford Whalers on June 1, 1993, in exchange for a sixth round draft pick.[8] In Hartford, the 34-year-old McCrimmon served as a mentor for 18-year-old Chris Pronger.[29] Offensively, he scored 16 points total in three seasons with the Whalers between 1993 and 1996. Leaving the team as a free agent, McCrimmon signed with the Phoenix Coyotes for the 1996–97 season.[8]
He appeared in 37 games that season, scoring one goal and adding five
assists. Following the season, he announced his retirement.[30]
McCrimmon was paired with some of the best defencemen of his generation. In addition to Lidstrom and Pronger, he played with Hockey Hall of Famers Ray Bourque, Mark Howe and Paul Coffey. He was known as a stay at home defenceman who focused on limiting the opposition’s chances.[31]
He played a physical game, often in the “dirty” areas of the ice –
battling opponents in the corners and in front of the net. McCrimmon’s
career plus-minus was +444, a total surpassed by only nine players as of
2012. Brian Propp, a teammate of his in Philadelphia, said that he was one of the most underrated defencemen of his time.[32]

Coaching career

View from behind of five hockey players, each wearing red uniforms with black trim. The back of all five players reads "MCCRIMMON 4".

The Calgary Flames wear special uniforms honouring McCrimmon prior to an NHL game in 2011–12.

McCrimmon moved behind the bench shortly after his retirement, joining the New York Islanders as an assistant coach to Mike Milbury on August 19, 1997.[30] He left the team after two years to become head coach of the Saskatoon Blades of the Western Hockey League in 1999.[33] In two seasons with the team, he coached 144 games with an overall win-loss-tie record of 50–79–15.[34] He returned to the NHL in 2000, joining the Calgary Flames as an assistant to Don Hay.[35] He remained with the team for two and a half seasons, serving under both Hay and successor Greg Gilbert until the team replaced its coaching staff on December 3, 2002.[36] He returned to the NHL in 2004 as an assistant for the Atlanta Thrashers. He was promoted to associate coach in his fourth season when team general manager Don Waddell fired head coach Bob Hartley during the 2007–08 season.[37]
McCrimmon had been offered the Thrashers head coaching position after
Waddell’s dismissal, but turned it down after the team failed to
guarantee he would retain the position beyond the end of the season.[38]
Leaving the Thrashers, McCrimmon signed a three-year contract with the
Detroit Red Wings in 2008 to serve as an assistant coach.[39]
Looking to further his career, he resigned as an assistant in Detroit on May 19, 2011, and was introduced as head coach of Lokomotiv Yaroslavl of the Kontinental Hockey League (KHL) on May 29.[40] He hoped that coaching the Russian club would help him land an NHL head coaching position in the future.[41] He never coached a game for Lokomotiv, as on September 7, 2011, the team’s plane crashed on take off en route to their first game of the season. McCrimmon died along with virtually his entire team.[42]

Personal life

McCrimmon was born in Dodsland, Saskatchewan, but grew up on the family farm near the village of Plenty. He often returned to his hometown during his playing days, spending his summers training on the family farm.[43]
He brought the Stanley Cup back to Plenty in 1989 after winning it with
the Flames, fulfilling a promise McCrimmon made to his grandfather as a
youth.[44]
Hockey was a significant part of McCrimmon’s life from his youth. His father Byron was a long time senior player and coach for the Rosetown Red Wings
in Saskatchewan. The younger McCrimmon played for teams in both Plenty
and Rosetown at the same time, often appearing on teams one level above
his age.[45] His younger brother Kelly is the owner and general manager of the Brandon Wheat Kings, with whom they played together as teammates in 1978–79.[46]
Nicknamed both “Beast” and “Sarge”, McCrimmon was often considered
“gruff” and had a direct way of speaking that cultivated respect amongst
his peers.[47] According to former teammate Lanny McDonald: “He was tough, he was abrasive, but on the inside he was a big teddy bear, a big softie.”[48] McCrimmon’s brother remembered him as a person who dedicated himself to his family.[46] Brad had two children with his wife Maureen: daughter Carlin and son Liam.[1]

Career statistics

Regular season and playoffs

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1974–75 Prince Albert Raiders SJHL 38 4 22 26
1975–76 Prince Albert Raiders SJHL 46 19 39 58 126
1976–77 Brandon Wheat Kings WCHL 72 18 66 84 96 15 3 10 13 16
1977–78 Brandon Wheat Kings WCHL 65 19 78 97 245 8 2 11 13 20
1978–79 Brandon Wheat Kings WHL 66 24 74 98 139 22 9 19 28 34
1978–79 Brandon Wheat Kings M-Cup 5 0 5 5 10
1979–80 Boston Bruins NHL 72 5 11 16 94 10 1 1 2 28
1980–81 Boston Bruins NHL 78 11 18 29 148 3 0 1 1 2
1981–82 Boston Bruins NHL 78 1 8 9 83 2 0 0 0 2
1982–83 Philadelphia Flyers NHL 79 4 21 25 61 3 0 0 0 4
1983–84 Philadelphia Flyers NHL 71 0 24 24 76 1 0 0 0 4
1984–85 Philadelphia Flyers NHL 66 8 35 43 81 11 2 1 3 15
1985–86 Philadelphia Flyers NHL 80 13 43 56 85 5 2 0 2 2
1986–87 Philadelphia Flyers NHL 71 10 29 39 52 26 3 5 8 30
1987–88 Calgary Flames NHL 80 7 35 42 98 9 2 3 5 22
1988–89 Calgary Flames NHL 72 5 17 22 96 22 0 3 3 30
1989–90 Calgary Flames NHL 79 4 15 19 78 6 0 2 2 8
1990–91 Detroit Red Wings NHL 64 0 13 13 81 7 1 1 2 21
1991–92 Detroit Red Wings NHL 79 7 22 29 118 11 0 1 1 8
1992–93 Detroit Red Wings NHL 60 1 14 15 71
1993–94 Hartford Whalers NHL 65 1 5 6 72
1994–95 Hartford Whalers NHL 33 0 1 1 42
1995–96 Hartford Whalers NHL 58 3 6 9 62
1996–97 Phoenix Coyotes NHL 37 1 5 6 18
NHL totals 1222 81 322 403 1416 116 11 18 29 176

International

Year Team Event GP G A Pts PIM
1978 Canada WJC 6 0 2 2 4
1979 Canada WJC 5 1 2 3 2
Junior totals 11 1 4 5 6

Coaching

Season Team League Regular season Post season
G W L T OTL Pct Division rank Result
1998–99 Saskatoon Blades WHL 72 16 49 7 .271 6th East Did not qualify
1999–00 Saskatoon Blades WHL 72 34 30 8 3 .549 2nd East Lost in second round
WHL totals 144 50 76 15 3 .410

Awards and honours

Medal record
Competitor for  Canada
Men’s ice hockey
World Junior Championships
Bronze 1978 Canada
Award Year
Junior
SJHL Defenceman of the Year 1975–76 [2]
WCHL Defenceman of the Year 1977–78 [4]
WHL All-Star Team 1977–78
1978–79
[5]
Memorial Cup All-Star Team 1979 [8]
National Hockey League
Second Team All-Star 1987–88 [49]
NHL Plus-Minus Award 1987–88 [50]
Team awards
Barry Ashbee Trophy
Philadelphia Flyers’ top defenceman
1984–85 [20]

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Pavel Snurnitsyn, Russian, died from a plane crash he was 19.

Pavel Sergeyevich Snurnitsyn was a Russian professional ice hockey player who played for Lokomotiv Yaroslavl of the Kontinental Hockey League died from a plane crash he was 19.
In August 2011, Snurnitsyn was among two players from Lokomotiv
Yaroslavl selected to play for the Russian Under-20 youth national team
of Russia.[1][2] The team played in the U20 Four Nations Tournament on September 1–3 in Podolsk, Russia.[3] Besides the Russians, Czech Republic, Sweden and Finland participated in the tournament.[4] Snurnitsyn scored two of the goals to beat Finland 11:4.[5]

(January 10, 1992 – September 7, 2011)

Death

On September 7, 2011, Snurnitsyn was killed, when a Yakovlev Yak-42
passenger aircraft, carrying nearly his entire Lokomotiv team, crashed
just outside Yaroslavl, Russia. The team was traveling to Minsk
to play their opening game of the season, with its coaching staff and
prospects. Lokomotiv officials said “‘everyone from the main roster was
on the plane plus four players from the youth team.’”

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Maxim Shuvalov, Russian, died from a plane crash he was 18.

Maxim Alexeyevich Shuvalov was a Russian professional ice hockey player who at the time of his death would have played for Lokomotiv Yaroslavl of the Kontinental Hockey League died from a plane crash he was 18..

(April 23, 1993 – September 7, 2011)

Biography

Maxim Shuvalov was a player for Russian junior national ice-hockey team. He won a bronze medal at 2011 IIHF World U18 Championship. At the club level, he played for the youth team of Lokomotiv Yaroslavl, Loko. He was transferred to the main team just before the start of the new KHL season.
On September 7, 2011, Shuvalov was killed in the 2011 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl air disaster,
when a Yakovlev Yak-42 passenger aircraft, carrying nearly his entire
Lokomotiv team, crashed just outside Yaroslavl, Russia. The team was
traveling to Minsk
to play their opening game of the season, with its coaching staff and
prospects. Lokomotiv officials said “‘everyone from the main roster was
on the plane plus four players from the youth team.’”[1][2][3]

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Ruslan Salei, Belarusian, died from a plane crash he was 36

Ruslan Albertovich “Rusty” Salei  was a Belarusian professional ice hockey player. Salei played 14 seasons in the National Hockey League (NHL) for the Detroit Red Wings, Colorado Avalanche, Florida Panthers and the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim, who selected him ninth overall in the 1996 NHL Entry Draft died from a plane crash he was 36..
Salei died on September 7, 2011, when a Yakovlev Yak-42 passenger aircraft, carrying the entire Lokomotiv Yaroslavl team of the Kontinental Hockey League crashed near Yaroslavl on its way to Minsk, Belarus, to start the 2011–12 KHL season.[1][2]

(November 2, 1974 – September 7, 2011)

Playing career

Salei was selected by the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim ninth overall at the 1996 NHL Entry Draft. In 1992, prior to being selected for the Ducks, Salei played in his native Belarus for Dinamo Minsk in the Russian Elite League. After the 1994–95 season, the Russian Elite League re-aligned, pushing Tivali Minsk to the side. Salei then came to North America, being signed by General Manager Bob Strumm of the Las Vegas Thunder without Sturmm knowing of his capabilities.[3][4]
During a successful spell with the Thunder, Salei was drafted by the
Ducks and soon signed a three-year deal worth $2.25 million.[1] Salei split time between the Ducks, Baltimore Bandits, and the Cincinnati Mighty Ducks of the American Hockey League (AHL) before becoming a full squad member of the Ducks by the end of the 1997–98 season.
In October 1999, Salei was suspended by the NHL for ten games after he checked Dallas Stars center Mike Modano face first into the boards from behind. Modano suffered a slight concussion, strained ligaments in his neck, and a broken nose.[5] Salei played all 21 playoff games in the 2002–03 NHL season, which saw the Ducks go all the way to the Stanley Cup finals, only to lose in seven games to the New Jersey Devils. Salei scored the overtime game-winning goal in Game 3 of that series.
During the 2004–05 NHL lockout, Salei played in the Russian Superleague (RSL) for AK Bars Kazan. He returned to the Ducks upon resumption of the NHL the following season and played with the Ducks until the end of the 2005–06 season, playing 594 regular season games in his career for Anaheim, the franchise record for a defenseman.


Ruslan Salei on November 15, 2007 with the Florida Panthers.

On July 2, 2006, Salei signed with the Florida Panthers on a four-year contract, worth $12 million.[6] Salei quickly settled with the Panthers with his most productive season in 2006–07,
where he totaled 32 points, scoring six goals and 26 assists in 82
regular season games. He continued his new-found offensive production in
2007–08 and as the Panthers fell out of playoff contention, Salei was traded at the NHL trade deadline to the Colorado Avalanche in exchange for Kārlis Skrastiņš and a third round draft pick on February 26, 2008.[7]
As a veteran and in his first full season with the Avalanche in 2008–09, Salei finished second among defenseman with 21 points in 70 games. He appeared in his 800th career NHL game against the St. Louis Blues on January 15, 2009[8] and surpassed 1,000 career penalty minutes against the Minnesota Wild on March 12, 2009.[9] Ruslan suffered a back injury to start the 2009–10 season subsequently missed 56 games.[10] He was able to recover in time to lead Belarus in the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics, but was relegated as a reserve defender upon his return to the Avalanche, playing in a career low 14 games.[11]
On August 9, 2010, the Detroit Red Wings
announced Salei signed as a free agent to a one-year contract with the
club worth $750,000, with an additional $350,000 in performance bonuses.[12] According to General Manager Ken Holland, Salei’s positive experiences under current Red Wings coach Mike Babcock in Anaheim contributed to his decision.[13] He scored two goals paired with eight assists during that season, as well as a goal during the 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs in Detroit’s first round matchup against the Phoenix Coyotes.
Salei signed a one-year contract with Lokomotiv Yaroslavl of the Kontinental Hockey League on July 5, 2011.

Death

On September 7, 2011, at 4:02 PM local time, the Yakovlev Yak-42
passenger aircraft, carrying nearly the entire hockey team of Lokomotiv
Yaroslavl of the Kontinental Hockey League (KHL) crashed near Yaroslavl,
Russia on its way to Minsk, Belarus, to start the 2011-12 KHL season.
Killing 43 of the 45 people onboard, including Salei. [14]

Awards

  • Belarus player of the year (2003, 2004)

Career statistics

Regular season and playoffs

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1992–93 Dinamo Minsk REL 9 1 0 1 10
1993–94 Tivali Minsk REL 39 2 3 5 50
1994–95 Tivali Minsk REL 51 4 2 6 44
1995–96 Las Vegas Thunder IHL 76 7 23 30 123 15 3 7 10 18
1996–97 Las Vegas Thunder IHL 8 0 2 2 24 3 2 1 3 6
1996–97 Baltimore Bandits AHL 12 1 4 5 12
1996–97 Mighty Ducks of Anaheim NHL 30 0 1 1 37
1997–98 Cincinnati Mighty Ducks AHL 6 3 6 9 14
1997–98 Mighty Ducks of Anaheim NHL 66 5 10 15 70
1998–99 Mighty Ducks of Anaheim NHL 74 2 14 16 65 3 0 0 0 4
1999–00 Mighty Ducks of Anaheim NHL 71 5 5 10 94
2000–01 Mighty Ducks of Anaheim NHL 50 1 5 6 70
2001–02 Mighty Ducks of Anaheim NHL 82 4 7 11 97
2002–03 Mighty Ducks of Anaheim NHL 61 4 8 12 78 21 2 3 5 26
2003–04 Mighty Ducks of Anaheim NHL 82 4 11 15 110
2004–05 Ak Bars Kazan RSL 35 8 11 19 36 3 0 0 0 2
2005–06 Mighty Ducks of Anaheim NHL 78 1 18 19 114 16 3 2 5 18
2006–07 Florida Panthers NHL 82 6 26 32 102
2007–08 Florida Panthers NHL 65 3 20 23 75
2007–08 Colorado Avalanche NHL 17 3 4 7 23 10 1 4 5 4
2008–09 Colorado Avalanche NHL 70 4 17 21 72
2009–10 Colorado Avalanche NHL 14 1 5 6 10 1 0 0 0 0
2010–11 Detroit Red Wings NHL 75 2 8 10 48 11 1 0 1 0
NHL totals 917 45 159 204 1065 62 7 9 16 52

International

Year Team Comp GP G A Pts PIM
1994 Belarus WC-C 6 1 2 3 10
1995 Belarus WC-C 4 0 1 1 4
1998 Belarus OQ 4 0 2 2 18
1998 Belarus OG 7 1 0 1 4
1998 Belarus WC 2 1 0 1 8
2000 Belarus WC 6 0 1 1 6
2001 Belarus WC 6 0 1 1 31
2002 Belarus OG 6 2 1 3 4
2004 Belarus WC-B 5 3 4 7 2
2005 Belarus OQ 2 1 0 1 2
2008 Belarus WC 5 0 2 2 6
2009 Belarus WC 6 2 3 5 6
2010 Belarus OG 4 1 0 1 0
2010 Belarus WC 6 1 1 2 8
Senior int’l totals 69 13 18 31 109

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Sergei Ostapchuk,Belarusian, died from a plane crash he was 21.

A

Sergei Igorevich Ostapchuk was an ice hockey player. He was playing with Lokomotiv Yaroslavl in the Kontinental Hockey League (KHL) died from a plane crash he was  21..
Ostapchuk died on September 7, 2011 in the 2011 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl air disaster. The plane was carrying the Lokomotiv hockey team from Yaroslavl to Minsk, the capital of Belarus, where it was to play against Dinamo Minsk in the 2011 season opening game of the KHL.

(March 3, 1990 – September 7, 2011)

Career statistics

Regular season and playoffs

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
2007–08 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl RSL 3 0 1 1 2
2008–09 Rouyn-Noranda Huskies QMJHL 61 29 34 63 40 5 1 3 4 20
2009–10 Rouyn-Noranda Huskies QMJHL 38 21 16 37 46 11 2 6 8 18
2009–10 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl KHL 8 0 0 0 4

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Karel Rachůnek,Czech, world champion, died from a plane crash he was 32.

Karel Rachůnek  was a Czech professional ice hockey player. Rachunek was the captain of Lokomotiv Yaroslavl of the Kontinental Hockey League (KHL) when the team’s plane crashed on September 7, 2011 died from a plane crash he was 32.. He played eight seasons in North America in the National Hockey League (NHL). Rachunek was drafted in the ninth round, 229th overall, by the Ottawa Senators in the 1997 NHL Entry Draft. Rachunek was the brother of Ivan Rachunek and Tomas Rachunek who have also played professional ice hockey.
 

(August 27, 1979 – September 7, 2011)

Early career

Rachunek played his junior hockey with AC ZPS Zlin Jr. of the Czech
Junior League from 1995 to 1997. In his rookie season in 1995–96,
Rachunek recorded eight goals and 19 points in 38 games. In his second
season with the club in 1996–97, Rachunek scored two goals and 13 points
in 27 games. In the 1997 NHL Entry Draft, the Ottawa Senators selected Rachunek in the ninth round, 229th overall.
In 1997–98, Rachunek moved to Zlin of the Czech Extraliga.
In his first season with the club, he scored a goal and three points in
27 games. In 1998–99, Rachunek improved his offensive numbers to three
goals and 12 points in 39 games, as well as accumulating 88 penalty
minutes, helping Zlin into the playoffs. In six playoff games, Rachunek
was held pointless.

Ottawa Senators

Rachunek made his North American debut with the Grand Rapids Griffins of the IHL in 1999–2000, which was the Ottawa Senators
top minor league affiliate. In 62 games with the Griffins, Rachunek had
six goals and 26 points, helping Grand Rapids earn a playoff berth. In
nine post-season games, Rachunek had five assists.
He also made his NHL debut with the Senators in 1999–2000. Rachunek made his debut on October 31, 1999, getting no points with 14:22 of ice time in the Senators 6–4 win over the Atlanta Thrashers. Rachunek appeared in six games with Ottawa, going pointless.
In 2000–01,
Rachunek made the Senators coming out of training camp. In his rookie
season, Rachunek appeared in 71 games, scoring three goals and 33
points, averaging nearly 21 minutes of ice time per game, helping the
Senators into the playoffs. Rachunek earned his first NHL point on
November 11, 2000, an assist on a goal by Magnus Arvedson in the Senators 4–3 loss to the Philadelphia Flyers. He would score his first NHL goal on January 16, 2001, scoring on Los Angeles Kings goaltender Jamie Storr in a 7–6 loss. Rachunek appeared in three playoff games, getting no points.
Rachunek missed 31 games in 2001–02 due to injuries. In 51 games with Ottawa, he scored three goals and 18 points. He then missed the playoffs due to injuries.
Rachunek missed the first part of the 2002–03 season due to a contract dispute, as he played for Lokomotiv Yaroslavl of the RSL.
In nine games with Yaroslavl, Rachunek had three goals. On November 8,
2002, he resigned with the Ottawa Senators, and would appear in 58 games
with them, scoring four goals and 29 points. Rachunek then played in 17
playoff games with the Senators, scoring a goal and four points. He
scored his first playoff goal against Martin Brodeur of the New Jersey Devils on May 17, 2003 in a 5–2 loss. Rachunek also played in six games with the Binghamton Senators of the AHL, earning two assists.
In 2003–04,
Rachunek played in 60 games with the Senators, scoring a goal and 17
points. His time with the Senators came to an end, as on March 9, 2004,
Ottawa traded Rachunek and Alexandre Giroux to the New York Rangers for Greg de Vries.

New York Rangers

Rachunek finished the 2003–04 season with the New York Rangers. He appeared in his first game with New York on March 12, 2004 against the Tampa Bay Lightning, as the Rangers lost 5–2. He scored his first goal and point as a Ranger on March 25, 2004, beating goaltender Tomas Vokoun of the Nashville Predators in a 4–2 loss. Rachunek finished the year playing in 12 games with the Rangers, scoring a goal and four points.

Orli Znojmo

With the 2004-05 NHL lockout cancelling the season, Rachunek signed with Orli Znojmo of the Czech Extraliga on September 6, 2004. In 21 games, he scored five goals and 11 points before becoming a free agent at the end of October.

Lokomotiv Yaroslavl

On November 1, 2004, Rachunek returned to Lokomotiv Yaroslav of the RSL, where he first played during the 2002–03 season when he and the Ottawa Senators
could not agree to a contract. He finished the 2004–05 season with the
club, getting six goals and 14 points in 27 games. In the playoffs,
Rachunek had two goals in nine games.
Rather than return to the NHL
for the 2005–06 season, Rachunek decided to remain with Yaroslavl. In
45 games, Rachunek had 11 goals and 27 points. He was then held
pointless in two playoff games, however, Rachunek accumulated 29 penalty
minutes in those two games.

New York Rangers

Rachunek returned to the New York Rangers for the 2006–07
season. In 66 games, Rachunek had six goals and 26 points, helping the
team into the playoffs. In six playoff games, Rachunek had four assists.
After the season, Rachunek became a free agent.

New Jersey Devils

On July 3, 2007, the New Jersey Devils signed Rachunek for the 2007–08 season. Rachunek played in his first game as a Devil on October 4, 2007, earning no points in a 3–1 loss to the Tampa Bay Lightning. He recorded his first point on October 8, 2007, an assist against his former team, the Ottawa Senators in a 4–2 loss. Rachunek scored his first goal with New Jersey on November 17, 2007, against Martin Biron of the Philadelphia Flyers
in a 6–2 win. Injuries cut his season short, as Rachunek appeared in
only 49 games, scoring four goals and 13 points. At the end of the
season, Rachunek was a free agent.

Dynamo Moscow

On August 31, 2008, Rachunek signed a contract with HC Dynamo Moscow of the KHL. In the 2008–09 season, Rachunek had nine goals and 32 points in 50 games. In 12 playoff games, Rachunek had four goals and eight points.
He returned to Dynamo Moscow for the 2009–10
season, where he scored 10 goals and 27 points in 52 games, helping the
club reach the post-season. In four playoff games, Rachunek had no
points.

Lokomotiv Yaroslavl

Rachunek returned to Lokomotiv Yaroslavl, now in the KHL for the third time in the 2010–11
season. In 50 games with Yaroslavl, Rachunek had 11 goals and 46
points, as the team finished with the best record in the Tarasov
Division. In 18 playoff games, Rachunek had eight goals and 13 points.
He returned to the team for 2011–12, however, on September 7, 2011, Rachunek was killed in a plane crash.

International career

Medal record
Competitor for  Czech Republic
World Championships
Gold 2010 Cologne Ice hockey
Bronze 2011 Bratislava Ice hockey

Rachunek played with the Czech Republic national ice hockey team in various tournaments throughout his career. At the 1999 World Junior Ice Hockey Championships held in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, Rachunek had a goal and four points in six games as the Czech Republic finished in seventh place.
At the 2009 IIHF World Championship held in Switzerland,
Rachunek had four assists in seven games, as the Czech Republic
finished in sixth place. Rachunek earned a spot on the team again for
the 2010 IIHF World Championship held in Germany, as he scored two goals and four points in nine games, helping the Czech Republic to the Gold Medal. Rachunek had an assist on the game winning goal in the Gold Medal game. At the 2011 IIHF World Championship held in Slovakia, Rachunek had a goal and three points in nine games, helping the Czech Republic to the Bronze Medal.

Death

Rachůnek died on September 7, 2011 in a plane crash,
along with his entire Lokomotiv team, just outside Yaroslavl, Russia.
The team was on its way to their 2011–2012 season opener with the entire
team, coaching staff, and prospects. Lokomotiv officials said “everyone
from the main roster was on the plane plus four players from the youth
team.” The team was traveling to Minsk to play their opening game of the season.”[2]
It was during the takeoff, after the runway of 3km that the airplane
simply couldn’t get up high enough, according to reports the plane
reached a total altitude of 10–50 meters before hitting a pylon and
dropping to the left. Parts of the airplane spread in Volga, and others
on plain land, as it broke apart just before once again touching the
ground.[3]

Career statistics

Note: GP = Games played, G = Goals, A = Assists, P =
Points, PIM = Penalty minutes, +/- = Plus/minus, S = Shots, S% =
Shooting percentage

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts +/- PIM S S% GP G A Pts +/- PIM S S%
1997–98 HC ZPS-Barum Zlín Czech 27 1 2 3 n/a 16 n/a n/a
1998–99 HC ZPS-Barum Zlín Czech 39 3 9 12 n/a 88 n/a n/a 6 0 0 0 n/a 0 n/a n/a
1999–00 Ottawa Senators NHL 6 0 0 0 0 2 3 0.0
1999–00 Grand Rapids Griffins IHL 62 6 20 26 +18 64 92 6.5 9 0 5 5 +5 6 n/a n/a
2000–01 Ottawa Senators NHL 71 3 30 33 +17 60 77 3.9 3 0 0 0 −4 0 7 0.0
2001–02 Ottawa Senators NHL 51 3 15 18 +7 24 55 5.5
2002–03 Ottawa Senators NHL 58 4 25 29 +23 30 110 3.6 17 1 3 4 −5 14 21 4.8
2002–03 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl RSL 9 3 0 3 +5 8 n/a n/a
2002–03 Binghamton Senators AHL 6 0 2 2 +2 10 11 0.0
2003–04 Ottawa Senators NHL 60 1 16 17 +17 29 99 1.0
2003–04 New York Rangers NHL 12 1 3 4 −9 4 21 4.8
2004–05 HC JME Znojemští Orli Czech 21 5 6 11 −6 55 n/a n/a
2004–05 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl RSL 27 6 8 14 −3 69 n/a n/a 9 2 0 2 −4 6 n/a n/a
2005–06 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl RSL 47 11 20 31 +14 73 n/a n/a 2 0 0 0 −1 29 n/a n/a
2006–07 New York Rangers NHL 66 6 20 26 −9 38 99 6.1 6 0 4 4 −1 2 8 0.0
2007–08 New Jersey Devils NHL 47 4 9 13 +3 40 68 5.9
2008–09 Dynamo Moscow KHL 50 9 23 32 +19 85 120 7.5 12 4 4 8 +4 8 36 11.1
2009–10 Dynamo Moscow KHL 52 10 17 27 −5 74 157 6.4 4 0 0 0 −5 6 19 0.0
2010–11 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl KHL 50 11 35 46 +11 99 132 8.3 18 8 5 13 +11 10 68 11.8
NHL totals 371 22 118 140 +49 227 532 4.1 26 1 7 8 -10 16 36 2.8
KHL totals 152 30 75 105 +25 258 409 7.3 34 12 9 21 +10 24 123 9.8
RSL totals 83 20 28 48 +16 150 11 2 0 2 -5 35
CZE totals 87 9 17 26 159 16 0 0 0 0

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Kārlis Skrastiņš, Latvian, died from a plane crash he was 37.

Kārlis Skrastiņš was a Latvian professional ice hockey player. Skrastins was a member of Lokomotiv Yaroslavl of the Kontinental Hockey League (KHL) and was on board the team plane which crashed on September 7, 2011 died from a plane crash he was 37.Skrastins played eleven seasons in the National Hockey League (NHL) before joining Lokomotiv in 2011.

(July 9, 1974 – September 7, 2011)

Playing career

Skrastiņš was drafted by Nashville Predators with the 230th pick in the ninth round of 1998 NHL Entry Draft.[2] He played for Nashville for next five seasons until being traded to the Colorado Avalanche in 2003.[3] On February 8, 2007, he played in his 487th consecutive game to pass Tim Horton for the longest playing streak in NHL history for a defenceman.[4] Skrastiņš’ streak ended at 495 games, when he missed a February 25, 2007 game against the Anaheim Ducks with a knee injury.[5] He had previously missed only one other game due to injury in his career — against St. Louis on February 18, 2000, with a minor shoulder injury. The streak led to him being given the nickname “Ironman”.[6]
In his fourth season with the Avalanche in 2007–08, he was traded to the Florida Panthers for Ruslan Salei on February 26, 2008.[7] In his first full season with the Panthers in 2008–09, Skrastiņš scored a career high 18 points in 80 games. On October 16, 2008, he played his 600th career NHL game against the Minnesota Wild[8]
and on November 1, 2008, he scored his 100th point in his NHL career in
a 3–2 loss fittingly against his original club, the Nashville
Predators.[9]
On July 2, 2009, he was signed by the Dallas Stars to a two-year contract worth $2.75 million.[10] He scored his only two goals of the 2009–10 season, including the game winner, on December 19 in a 4–3 Stars victory over the Detroit Red Wings.[11]
On May 17, 2011, after eleven seasons in the NHL, Skrastiņš left to sign a contract with Russian team, Lokomotiv Yaroslavl.[12]

Death

On September 7, 2011, he was killed, when a Yakovlev Yak-42 passenger aircraft, carrying nearly his entire Lokomotiv team, crashed just outside Yaroslavl, Russia.[13] The team was traveling to Minsk
to play their opening game of the season, with its coaching staff and
prospects. Lokomotiv officials said “‘everyone from the main roster was
on the plane plus four players from the youth team.’”

Career statistics

Regular season and playoffs

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1991–92 Pardaugava Riga LHL 16 7 6 13 10  —  —  —  —  —
1992–93 Pardaugava Riga LHL 10 7 2 9 12  —  —  —  —  —
1992–93 Pardaugava Riga RSL 40 3 5 8 16 2 0 0 0 0
1993–94 Pardaugava Riga RSL 42 7 5 12 18 2 1 0 1 4
1994–95 Pardaugava Riga RSL 52 4 14 18 69  —  —  —  —  —
1995–96 TPS SM-l 50 4 11 15 32 11 2 2 4 10
1996–97 TPS SM-l 50 2 8 10 20 12 0 4 4 2
1997–98 TPS SM-l 48 4 15 19 67 4 0 0 0 0
1998–99 Nashville Predators NHL 2 0 1 1 0  —  —  —  —  —
1998–99 Milwaukee Admirals IHL 75 8 36 44 47 2 0 1 1 2
1999–00 Nashville Predators NHL 59 5 6 11 20  —  —  —  —  —
1999–00 Milwaukee Admirals IHL 19 3 8 11 10  —  —  —  —  —
2000–01 Nashville Predators NHL 82 1 11 12 30  —  —  —  —  —
2001–02 Nashville Predators NHL 82 4 13 17 36  —  —  —  —  —
2002–03 Nashville Predators NHL 82 3 10 13 44  —  —  —  —  —
2003–04 Colorado Avalanche NHL 82 5 8 13 26 11 0 2 2 2
2004–05 HK Riga 2000 BLR 34 8 17 25 30 3 0 0 0 25
2004–05 HK Riga 2000 LHL 4 0 4 4 0 9 3 10 13 33
2005–06 Colorado Avalanche NHL 82 3 11 14 65 9 0 1 1 10
2006–07 Colorado Avalanche NHL 68 0 11 11 30  —  —  —  —  —
2007–08 Colorado Avalanche NHL 43 1 3 4 20  —  —  —  —  —
2007–08 Florida Panthers NHL 17 1 0 1 12  —  —  —  —  —
2008–09 Florida Panthers NHL 80 4 14 18 30  —  —  —  —  —
2009–10 Dallas Stars NHL 79 2 11 13 24  —  —  —  —  —
2010–11 Dallas Stars NHL 74 3 5 8 38  —  —  —  —  —
NHL totals 832 32 104 136 375 20 0 3 3 12

International

Year Team Event GP G A Pts PIM
1993 Latvia WC-C 7 1 6 7 0
1993 Latvia OQ 4 1 1 2 2
1994 Latvia WJC-C 4 1 5 6 33
1994 Latvia WC-B 7 3 5 8 0
1995 Latvia WC-B 7 1 1 2 4
1997 Latvia WC 8 0 3 3 4
1999 Latvia WC 6 1 1 2 6
2000 Latvia WC 7 1 2 3 4
2001 Latvia WC 6 3 0 3 0
2002 Latvia OG 1 0 0 0 0
2003 Latvia WC 6 3 3 6 27
2005 Latvia OQ 3 1 0 1 0
2005 Latvia WC 6 2 0 2 2
2006 Latvia OG 5 0 1 1 0
2009 Latvia WC 7 1 1 2 0
2010 Latvia OG 4 0 0 0 0
Junior Int’l totals 4 1 5 6 33
Senior Int’l totals 84 18 24 42 49

To see more of who died in 2011 click here


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