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Genaro Hernández, American boxer, died from cancer he was , 45.

 Genaro Hernández was a Mexican-American boxer from South Central Los Angeles. Hernández is the former WBA and WBC Super Featherweight Champion died from cancer he was , 45.. Genaro even worked as a compubox technician for HBO Boxing and a boxing instructor in Southern California. During his days as a world champion Hernández was a staple of the major cable television boxing shows with most of his fights broadcast on HBO Boxing.In the course of his career Genaro held several World Championships.

(May 10, 1966 – June 7, 2011)

Pro career

Hernández, a Mexican-American, enjoyed a distinguished career as a professional boxer. His debut as a paid fighter came on September 27, 1984, when he beat Dino Ramirez by a decision in four rounds at Inglewood.[10] He racked up a record of 13-0 with 6 knockouts and a solid reputation as a future champion around Southern California, when he met former Julio César Chávez world title challenger Refugio Rojas on November 22, 1988. He beat Rojas, who had lasted seven rounds against Chávez, by a knockout in round six. This enabled Hernández to enter the WBA Jr. Lightweight rankings.[11] Hernandez went on to win seven more fights, four by knockout, including one over former world title challenger Felipe Orozco, and another, in his first professional fight abroad: a three round knockout over Leon Collins in Tokyo, Japan.[12]

WBA Super Featherweight Championship

Exactly two years after his win over Rojas, Hernández got his first world title try, against Daniel Londas, on November 22, 1991 at Épernay, France. Hernández did not disappoint those who had predicted him to be a future world champion as he knocked out world champion Londas in nine rounds in front of Londas’ hometown crowd, becoming World Junior Lightweight champion.[13] In 1992, he defended his crown twice, knocking out Omar Catari in six rounds and, travelling to Japan once more, defeating challengers Masuaki Takeda and Yuji Watanabe, Takeda by decision and Watanabe by knockout in six.[14]
His next fight proved historic, albeit for the wrong reasons. Defending on April 26, 1993, once again at Inglewood against former world Featherweight champion Raúl Pérez, Hernández had to settle for a first round technical draw. This was the first, and so far only, world title fight in which no punches were landed. Right after the initial bell, Perez headbutted Hernández, and Perez bled profusely from an arteric vein on his forehead. The referee summoned the ring doctor, who decided the fight should be stopped as Perez required immediate surgery.[15] In the June 28th rematch later that year, Hernández retained the world title by a knockout in round eight. Hernandez then closed the year by defeating Harold Warren by decision to once again keep his title. In 1994, Hernandez retained the title twice, including a victory over Jimmy Garcia, (who would sadly die later after a fight with Gabriel Ruelas). By the end of 1994, Hernández was clamoring for a world title fight against crosstown rival and WBO world Lightweight champion Oscar De La Hoya.[16]
After eight successful title defenses, Hernández vacated his WBA super featherweight title in order to face De La Hoya in the upcoming year. Hernández began 1995 by beating another Mexican boxing legend, Jorge Maromero Páez, by a knockout in eight rounds at Inglewood. The Hernández-Páez fight was overshadowed by another news that rattled the Hispanic world that day: The death of famed Tejano singer Selena Quintanilla.[17]

WBO Lightweight Championship

On September 9, the highly anticipated encounter between Hernández and de la Hoya took place in Las Vegas. Hernández lost for the first time in his career as he was knocked out in six rounds by the younger, heavier De La Hoya.[18] Up until the fight’s end, the judges had de la Hoya holding a lead on all three scorecards. After the loss Hernández took some brief time off but by 1996 he was back inside the ring, winning two bouts that year.[19]

WBC Super Featherweight Championship

In 1997, he fought what almost turned into another controversial fight when he challenged Azumah Nelson for the WBC world Jr. Lightweight title, in Corpus Christi, Texas.[20] Ahead on all scorecards at the end of round seven, he was hit in his throat by a Nelson punch after the bell. He needed some time to recuperate from the illegal late hit, and WBC President José Sulaiman came to his corner and informed him that if he could not continue he would be declared winner by disqualification.[21] Hernández told Sulaiman something along the lines of I want to win it like real champions do, and he went back to the fight at the beginning of round eight. The fight ended after twelve rounds and Hernández finally won the World Jr. Lightweight title for a second time by defeating Nelson with a split decision victory.[22]
Hernández went on to defend his crown against such capable challengers as future Super Featherweight champion Anatoly Alexandrov, Carlos Gerena and another future world champion Carlos Famoso Hernandez, a gym-mate and personal friend who would later become El Salvador‘s first world boxing champion in history.[23]

Retirement

In what would turn out to be his last fight, on October 3 of 1998 he lost the crown to Floyd Mayweather Jr. by an 8th round retirement.[24] In December of that year, after he was diagnosed with a blood clot and a torn cartilage muscle, he announced his retirement with a record of 38 wins, 2 losses and 1 draw, with 17 of those wins coming by knockout. He had intended to challenge WBC world Lightweight champion César Bazán before the diagnosis.[25]

Professional record

Result
Opponent
Type
Round
Date
Location
Notes
Loss
RTD
8
1998-10-03
Las Vegas Hilton, Las Vegas, Nevada, United States
Lost WBC Super Featherweight title.
Win
UD
12
1998-05-16
Fantasy Springs Casino, Indio, California, United States
Retained WBC Super Featherweight title.
Win
UD
12
1997-11-20
Olympic Auditorium, Los Angeles, California, United States
Retained WBC Super Featherweight title.
Win
SD
12
1997-06-14
Alamodome, San Antonio, Texas, United States
Retained WBC Super Featherweight title.
Win
SD
12
1997-03-22
Memorial Coliseum, Corpus Christi, Texas, United States
Won WBC Super Featherweight title.
Win
Antonio Hernandez
UD
10
1996-09-28
Fort Worth, Texas, United States
Win
Javier Pichardo
TKO
5
1996-05-08
Fantasy Springs Casino, Indio, California, United States
Loss
RTD
6
1995-09-09
Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada, United States
WBO Lightweight title on the line.
Win
TKO
8
1995-03-31
Arrowhead Pond, Anaheim, California, United States
Win
Jimmy Garcia
UD
12
1994-11-12
Plaza Mexico, Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico
Retained WBA World Super Featherweight title.
Win
Jorge Ramirez
TKO
8
1994-01-31
Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, United States
Retained WBA World Super Featherweight title.
Win
UD
12
1993-10-11
Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, United States
Retained WBA World Super Featherweight title.
Win
KO
8
1993-06-28
Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, United States
Retained WBA World Super Featherweight title.
Draw
TD
1
1993-04-26
Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, United States
WBA World Super Featherweight title on the line.
Win
Yuji Watanabe
TKO
6
1992-11-20
Metropolitan Gym, Tokyo, Japan
Retained WBA World Super Featherweight title.
Win
Masuaki Takeda
UD
12
1992-07-15
International Center, Fukuoka, Japan
Retained WBA World Super Featherweight title.
Win
UD
12
1992-02-24
Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, United States
Retained WBA World Super Featherweight title.
Win
TKO
9
1991-11-22
Complex Sport le COMEP, Épernay, Marne, France
Won vacant WBA World Super Featherweight title.
Win
Pedro Arroyo
DQ
10
1991-02-11
Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, United States
Win
Rodolfo Gomez
KO
5
1990-12-06
Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, United States
Win
Ben Lopez
TKO
6
1990-09-22
Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, United States
Win
Richard Abila
KO
3
1990-08-27
Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, United States
Win
Leon Collins
KO
3
1990-05-10
Korakuen Hall, Tokyo, Japan
Win
Felipe Orozco
UD
10
1989-07-31
Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, United States
Win
Ed Pollard
UD
10
1989-05-15
Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, United States
Win
Refugio Rojas
KO
6
1988-11-22
Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, United States
Won USA California State Super Featherweight title.
Win
Jose Mosqueda
UD
10
1988-07-25
Marriott Hotel, Irvine, California, United States
Win
Juan Manuel Vega
TKO
9
1988-04-25
Marriott Hotel, Irvine, California, United States
Win
Kenny Wyatt
UD
10
1987-08-31
Marriott Hotel, Irvine, California, United States
Win
J L Ivey
UD
10
1986-12-12
Las Vegas, Nevada, United States
Win
Lupe Miranda
UD
10
1986-09-12
Las Vegas, Nevada, United States
Win
Terry Baldwin
TKO
7
1986-07-21
Marriott Hotel, Irvine, California, United States
Win
Jorge Valdez
TKO
3
1986-04-28
Marriott Hotel, Irvine, California, United States
Win
Larry Villarreal
UD
6
1986-03-31
Marriott Hotel, Irvine, California, United States
Win
Terry Baldwin
KO
2
1986-02-24
Marriott Hotel, Irvine, California, United States
Win
Pablo Montano
TKO
2
1986-02-17
Phoenix, Arizona, United States
Win
Jose Maytorena
KO
1
1985-12-12
Fairgrounds, Bakersfield, California, United States
Win
Randy Archuleta
UD
6
1985-10-29
Stockton, California, United States
Win
Dino Ramirez
UD
6
1985-06-24
Marriott Hotel, Irvine, California, United States
Win
Martin Escobar
UD
4
1984-11-17
Olympic Auditorium, Los Angeles, California, United States
Win
Dino Ramirez
UD
4
1984-09-27
Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, United States
Genaro’s professional debut.

Life after boxing

After retiring from boxing Hernández was diagnosed with fourth-stage cancer of the head and neck, a very rare form of cancer, and one which Hernández’ insurance would not cover for treatment. Although Hernández has collected several large purses in his career, including $600,000 for his final fight against Mayweather,[26] he was not able to afford his expensive treatments and benefits were held to assist in paying what insurance would not cover. In mid 2009 it was reported that Hernández’ cancer was in remission [27] but in early 2010 the cancer had returned and Hernández was undergoing treatment.[28] On June 3rd, 2011, it was announced that Hernández would stop chemotherapy treatment.[29]
Hernández worked as a boxing instructor at the LA Boxing Gym in Lake Forest, California until early 2011. He helped out in a broadcast of a boxing match in Maywood after that.[30]

Death

Hernández died from cancer on June 7, 2011 at the age of 45.[31]

 

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José Pagán, Puerto Rican baseball player (San Francisco Giants, Pittsburgh Pirates), died he had Alzheimer’s disease he was , 76.

José Antonio Pagán Rodríguez was a Puerto Rican Major League Baseball player died he had Alzheimer’s disease he was , 76..

(May 5, 1935 – June 7, 201)

Baseball career

Pagán made his major league debut with the San Francisco Giants on August 8, 1959. He played for the Giants until 1965 and then was traded to the Pittsburgh Pirates. In 1973, he played his final career games with the Philadelphia Phillies. Pagán played for a total of 15 years before retiring.
His best full season, statistically, came with the Giants in 1962, when he hit .259 and drove in a career high 57 runs. He had 73 runs scored that year, which was also a career high, while collecting 150 hits for the first and only time in his career. Despite playing part-time for the Pirates from 1966–1970, Pagán batted in the .260s twice and the .280s twice out of those five years, only hitting under .264 in 1968 when he only had 163 at bats. During that time, instead of short stop, he played mostly third base and left field, but was used as a key spare part for the team, playing games at every position in the infield; even one at catcher in 1967 for one inning.
Pagán appeared in two world series in his career; first at the age of 27 with the Giants, when he was on the losing side of the 1962 World Series against the New York Yankees. Despite the loss, he hit .368 with a home run in the seven-game series. With the Pirates in 1971, after losing the NLCS in 1970, he won his only world series and became a hero of the deciding game. In game seven of the 1971 World Series between the Pirates and the Baltimore Orioles, in the top of the 8th inning, Pagán hit a double which scored Willie Stargell. This proved to be the game’s winning run.
After his playing career ended, Pagán was a Pittsburgh Pirates coach from 1974 to 1978. He also managed teams in the Puerto Rican Winter League for several seasons, and lived in Puerto Rico before moving his family to Florida in 1999.

Death

Pagán died June 7, 2011, at his home in Sebring, Florida, a victim of Alzheimer’s disease.[2] He was 76, and was survived by his wife and two sons.[3] He was held in such esteem by the Pittsburgh organization that a moment of silence was observed before the Pirates game with the Arizona Diamondbacks at PNC Park that night.

 

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Jorge Semprún, Spanish writer and politician died he was , 87..

Jorge Semprún Maura  was a Spanish writer and politician who lived in France most of his life and wrote primarily in French. From 1953 to 1962, during the era of Francisco Franco, Semprún lived clandestinely in Spain working as an organizer for the exiled Communist Party of Spain, but was expelled from the party in 1964. After the death of Franco and change to a democratic government, he served as Culture Minister of Spain from 1988 to 1991. He was a screenwriter for two successive films by the Greek director Costa-Gavras, Z (1969) and The Confession (1970), which dealt with the theme of persecution by governments. For his work on Z, Semprun was nominated for an Oscar. In 1996, he became the first non-French author elected to the Académie Goncourt, which awards an annual literary prize.

(10 December 1923 – 7 June 2011)

Early life and education

Jorge Semprún Maura was born in 1923 in Madrid. His mother was Susana Maura Gamazo, a daughter of Antonio Maura, who served several times as prime minister of Spain. His father José María Semprún Gurrea (1893–1966) was a liberal politician and governor in the Republic of Spain during the Spanish Civil War.

Émigrés and World War II

In the wake of Republican defeat in the Civil War, the Semprun family moved to France, and then to The Hague. His father was a diplomat in the mission of the “Spanish Republic in the Netherlands” up to the beginning of 1939. After the Netherlands officially recognized the Franco government, the family returned to France as refugees. Jorge Semprún enrolled at the Lycée Henri IV and later the Sorbonne.
During the Nazi occupation of France, as a young man Semprún joined the Francs-Tireurs et Partisans – Main-d’Œuvre Immigrée (FTP-MOI), a Resistance organization made up mostly of immigrants. After joining the Spanish Communist Party in 1942 in France, Semprun was reassigned to the Francs-Tireurs et Partisans (FTP), the Communist armed Resistance.[2] In 1943 he was arrested by the Gestapo and deported to the Buchenwald concentration camp for his role in the Resistance.[2]
In 1945 Semprun returned to France and became an active member of the exiled Communist Party of Spain (PCE). From 1953 to 1962, he was an important organizer of the PCE’s clandestine activities in Spain, using the pseudonym of Federico Sánchez.[3] He entered the party’s executive committee in 1956. In 1964 he was expelled from the party because of “differences regarding the party line,” and from then on he concentrated on his writing career.
Semprun has written many novels, plays, and screenplays, for which he received several awards, including an Oscar in 1970 and the 1997 Jerusalem Prize. He was a screenwriter for two successive films by the Greek director Costa-Gavras, dealing with the theme of persecution by governments, Z (1969) and The Confession (1970). For his work on Z, he was nominated for the Oscar for the best screenplay adaptation but did not win.[4]
He was a member of the jury at the 1984 Cannes Film Festival.[5] After the change of governments in Spain, Semprun served from 1988 to 1991 as the appointed Minister of Culture.
In 1996, Semprún became the first non-French author to be elected to the Académie Goncourt, which awards an annual prize for literature written in French. In 2002, he was awarded the inaugural Ovid Prize in recognition of his entire body of work, which focuses on “tolerance and freedom of expression.”[6]
Jorge Semprún served as the honorary chairman of the Spanish branch of Action Against Hunger.[7] He lived in Paris.

Marriage and family

Semprun married Loleh Bellon in 1949. Their son, Jaime Semprun (1947–2010), was also a writer.[8] Then, Semprun married Colette Leloup in 1958, their sons: Dominique, Ricardo, Lourdes, Juan and Pablo.

Style and themes

Semprún wrote primarily in French and alludes to French authors as much as to Spanish ones. Most of his books are fictionalized accounts of his deportation to Buchenwald. His writing is non-linear and achronological. The narrative setting shifts back and forth in time, exploring the past and future of key events. With each recounting, events take on different meanings. Semprún’s works are self-reflexive. His narrators explore how events live on in memory and means of communicating the events of the concentration camp to readers who cannot fathom that experience. His recent work in this vein also includes reflections on the meaning of Europe and of being European, as informed by this period of history, including how Buchenwald was reopened by Soviet forces and then largely razed and planted over to hide the mass graves from this second dark episod.[9]
Semprún’s writing in Spanish deals with Spanish subject matter, and includes two volumes of memoirs: Autobiografía de Federico Sánchez, about his clandestine work in and later exclusion from the Spanish Communist Party (1953–1964), and Federico Sánchez se despide de ustedes, which deals with his term of service as Minister of Culture in the second Socialist government of Felipe Gonzalez (1988–1991). A novel in Spanish, Veinte años y un día, is set in 1956 and deals with recent history in Spain.

Selected works

Semprún’s first book, Le grand voyage (The Long Voyage in English, recently republished as The Cattle Truck), was published in 1963 by Gallimard. It recounts Semprún’s deportation and incarceration in Buchenwald in fictionalized form. A feature of the novel, and with Semprún’s work in general, is its fractured chronology. The work recounts his train journey and arrival at the concentration camp. During the long trip, the narrator provides the reader with flashbacks to his experiences in the French Resistance and flash-forwards to life in the camp and after liberation. The novel won two literary prizes, the Prix Formentor and Prix littéraire de la Résistance (“Literary Prize of the Resistance”).
In 1977, his Autobiografía de Federico Sánchez (Autobiography of Federico Sánchez) won the Premio Planeta, the most highly remunerated literary prize in Spain. In spite of the pseudonymous title, the work is Semprún’s least fictionalized volume of autobiography,[10] recounting his life as a member of the central committee of the Spanish Communist Party (PCE), and his undercover activities in Spain between 1953 and 1964. The book shows a stark view of Communist organizations during the Cold War, and presents a very critical portrait of leading figures of the PCE, including Santiago Carrillo and Dolores Ibárruri.
What a Beautiful Sunday (Quel beau dimanche !), his novel of life in Buchenwald and after liberation was published by Grasset in 1980. It purports to tell what it was like to live one day, hour by hour, in the concentration camp, but like Semprún’s other novels, the narrator recounts events that precede and follow that day. In part, Semprún was inspired by A Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, and the work contains a criticism of Stalinism as well as fascism.
Literature or Life was published by Gallimard in 1994. The French title, L’Ecriture ou la vie, might be better translated as “Writing or Life”. Semprún explores themes related to deportation, but the focus is on living with the memory of the experience and how to write about it. Semprún revisits scenes from previous works and gives rationales for his literary choices.

 

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Edgar Tekere, Zimbabwean politician, died from cancer he was , 74.

 Edgar Zivanai Tekere was a Zimbabwean politician died from cancer he was , 74. He was a president of the Zimbabwe African National Union who organised the party during the Lancaster House talks and served in government before his popularity as a potential rival to Robert Mugabe caused their estrangement.


(1 April 1937 – 7 June 2011)

Pre-Independence

During the war, Tekere served on the ZANU high command, or Dare reChimurenga. He was detained by the Rhodesian government at Gonakudzingwa.[4]

Early life

Edgar Zivanai “2-Boy” (nom de guerre) Tekere was an early ally of Robert Mugabe within the Zimbabwe African National Union (of which he was a founder member in 1964) during the fight for independence and against the Rhodesian Front government of Ian Smith. Mugabe and Tekere, having served eleven and a half years in Hwa-Hwa Penitentiary & Gonakudzingwa State Prison as political prisoners of Ian Smith’s government, immediately left upon release and crossed the Eastern Highlands Border in Mutare through the mountains by foot, following the Gairezi river trail to Seguranza military camp in Mozambique, to mastermind and kickstart guerilla warfare, aided by Samora Machel, in 1975. The Bush War or Second Chimurenga raged on. harassment of Tekere’s close family members and relatives by the platoon of Rhodesian Front Soldiers, Selous Scouts, Police Special Branch and Central Intelligence Organisation, under the auspices of Ian Smith.
During these trying times Edgar Tekere received the code name/nickname (“Mukoma”) by close family members and relatives. Tekere was elected by a democratic process to be the first ZANU-PF Secretary-General following Zimbabwe’s independence.

Independence Celebration and Bob Marley

Edgar Tekere being the ZANU-PF Secretary General, personally invited Bob Marley to perform at Rufaro Stadium, for the official Zimbabwean Independence Celebration. Marley’s music was the inspiration for the guerilla freedom fighters whilst they were in the bush fighting. More than 100 000 Zimbabweans attended the concert, and Bob Marley performed the song “Zimbabwe”, an unofficial Zimbabwean anthem. He also stayed with Edgar Tekere during this tour date.[5]

Murder charge

When ZANU won the 1980 elections, Tekere was appointed as Minister of Manpower Planning in Mugabe’s Cabinet. He followed his appointment by making a series of outspoken speeches that went far beyond government policy. Shortly after his appointment, on 4 August 1980 he greeted then-Prime Minister Mugabe and visiting President of Mozambique Samora Machel in combat fatigues, announcing that he was going “to fight a battle.” Tekere and his bodyguards went looking for supporters of Joshua Nkomo‘s ZAPU outside Harare but, failing to find them, went onto a neighboring farm and shot white farm manager Gerald Adams.

Trial

Tekere retained his government post when he went on trial together with seven bodyguards who were all former guerilla fighters in the independence war. On 8 December the High Court, on a majority decision, found him not guilty of murder. Both assessors, overruling the judge, held that while Tekere had killed Adams, he was acting in terms of an utter conviction that State Security was at risk.[6]
It is important to note that, at the trial, there was simply no evidence led that Edgar Tekere and his platoon had first gone looking for Zapu operatives before conducting a military style sweep of the farm on which the farmer was killed. There was no evidence that he had said that he was proud to have killed Gerald Adams. State Counsel Chris Glaum did not put this to any of the defendants. The trial was presided over by Judge John Pitman J. There were two assessors, Christopher Navavie Greenland, a provincial magistrate, and Peter Nemampara, a senior magistrate. The court was especially constituted to present as racially balance in that Judge Pitman was white, Greenland was a Euro-African and Nemampara was black. It was the first and last time that a court was constituted in this way.
Tekere was represented by Blom-Cooper QC, a flamboyant English counsel, and there were many confrontations between him and the presiding judge. The court was unanimous that Tekere was guilty of murder. However, by a majority, it found that as he had acted in “good faith” at the time, he was entitled to indemnification under a law that Ian Smith, the previous Rhodesian Prime Minister, had ironically enacted despite widespread opposition to protect his security forces during the Bush War. Any member of the country’s security forces was exempt from conviction in respect of any crime committed if, at the time of commission, such member was acting in “good faith”, acting in terms of a genuinely held conviction that the State’s security interests were being served.
Greenland wrote the judgement in which the two assessors overruled Pitman on this issue. It was the first time in the history of the country that assessors overruled a judge. The assessors found that Tekere presented with a personality and mindset which was completely consistent with an unreasonable but genuinely held belief that he was acting in the interest of state security with the confrontation between one of his men and the farmer, in which the latter was killed, an unfortunate consequence of the security sweep which Tekere genuinely believed needed to be conducted.
In his book “The Other – without fear, favour or prejudice”, Greenland reveals, for the first time in 2010, that Judge Pitman made a surprising and inexplicable “about-face”, having first been firmly of the view that Tekere was entitled to the indemnity and then changing his mind without proferring good reason. [7]

Rivalry with Mugabe

Tekere was dismissed from the government on 11 January 1981, a decision he was reported to be happy with; he retained the Secretary-Generalship of ZANU. In April 1981 he was detained by Kenyan security forces to prevent him from speaking to students after giving a newspaper interview in which he said he was proud of the killing of Gerald Adams. In July, Tekere referred to some ZANU representatives as having “inherited the colonial mentality,” which was straining relations between them and the party’s supporters. Mugabe hit back by saying “Those who are complaining that the revolution is not continuing… are the most immoral and laziest in the party.” Tekere was increasingly seen as a leader of a rival faction to Mugabe, and was dismissed as Secretary-General on 9 August with Mugabe taking the post himself.
After criticising corruption in the party, in August 1984 Tekere was elected to the Central Committee of ZANU-PF and carried shoulder-high from the Congress; he was also being supported by the Whites in Zimbabwe after opposing the farm squats by ZANU-PF) supporters which he described as “donga watonga” (chaotic government). He was provincial chairman of ZANU-PF in Mutare.

Zimbabwe Unity Movement

Tekere supported Mugabe at the 1985 elections but by October 1988 his consistent criticism of corruption resulted in his expulsion from the party. When Mugabe voiced his belief that Zimbabwe would be better governed as a one party state, Tekere strongly disagreed, saying “A one-party state was never one of the founding principles of ZANU-PF and experience in Africa has shown that it brought the evils of nepotism, corruption and inefficiency.”
He ran against Robert Mugabe in the 1990 Presidential race as the candidate of the Zimbabwe Unity Movement, offering a broadly free market platform against Mugabe’s communist-style economic planning. Edgar Tekere received unprecedented support for his opposition to Mugabe which led to massive election rigging by ZANU [8] in order for Mugabe to win the election on 1 April 1990 receiving 2,026,976 votes while Tekere only got 413,840 (16% of the vote). At the simultaneous Parliamentary elections the ZUM won 20% of the vote but only two seats in the House of Assembly. Zimbabwe Unity Movement supporters were the targets of violent attacks from supporters of ZANU (PF) and five candidates were murdered. A student representative Israel Mutanhaurwa of ZUM was abducted in broad daylight by suspected state agents at the local cinemas in Gweru to be dumped unharmed on the outskirts of Mkoba a local surbub. No-one was arrested or convicted of the crime. Those convicted of the attempted murder of former Gweru Mayor Patrick Kombayi who was shot in lower abdomen but survived the shooting, were pardoned immediately afterwards.

Politics after 1990

Tekere dropped out of sight after the election, fuelling rumours that he was planted as an opposition figure[citation needed]. In 2005 he voiced his wish to stand as a ZANU (PF) candidate for the Senate of Zimbabwe but was rebuffed. In 2006 it was reported that he had rejoined ZANU (PF). A letter sent to him by ZANU (PF) national chairman John Nkomo dated 7 April 2006 said “You will not exercise your right to be elected to any office in the party for a period of five years. You will be required to uphold all the duties of a member listed in Article 3, Section 18 of the amended Zanu PF constitution”.

2008 Makoni presidential campaign

At a rally on 2 March 2008 in Highfield, a suburb of Harare, Tekere endorsed Simba Makoni, an independent candidate who was running against Mugabe in the March 2008 presidential election. Tekere said that he was “appointing [him]self principal campaigner for Mugabe’s downfall”.[8]

MDC 10th anniversary celebrations

On Sunday, 16 August 2009 at Sakubva Stadium in Mutare in Manicaland. Edgar Tekere was the guest of honour for the MDC in front of a crowd of 40,000 people who had gathered to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the founding and formation of the MDC political party led by Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai.

Death

Edgar “2-Boy” Zivanai Tekere, a leading figure in Zimbabwe’s liberation struggle, died on Tuesday Noon 7th. June 2011, at Murambi Clinic, in the city of Mutare (Zimbabwe’s Third Major City),in the State Province of Manicaland, which is in the Eastern region of Zimbabwe.This occurred following a long battle with prostate cancer. He was 74 years old.[9]

National Hero Status

 

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John R. Alison, American World War II combat flying ace, launched the Allied Reoccupation of Burma died he was , 98.

John R. “Johnny” Alison was a highly decorated American combat ace of World War II and veteran of the Korean War, and is often cited as the father of Air Force Special Operations died he was , 98.



(November 21, 1912 – June 6, 2011),

Early years

Born in Micanopy, Florida,[3] near Gainesville in 1912, Alison graduated from the University of Florida School of Engineering and joined the United States Army Air Corps in 1936.[4] He earned his wings and was commissioned at Kelly Field in 1937.[2] Prior to America’s entry into World War II, he served as Assistant Military Attache in England and helped British pilots transition into the P-40.[2] In October 1941, Alison traveled to Moscow to administer the sensitive U.S.-Soviet P-40 Lend-Lease program. He trained Russian pilots in the P-40, A-20, and B-25 Mitchell aircraft.[2] In his autobiography, Jimmy Doolittle wrote:

Combat

After ten months and repeated requests for reassignment to combat, Alison got his wish. In June 1942, he reported to the China-Burma-India Theater (CBI) to serve as Deputy Squadron Commander under major David Lee “Tex” Hill in the 75th Fighter Squadron, part of Colonel Robert Lee Scott, Jr.‘s 23rd Fighter Group, the USAAF successor of the AVG‘s famed Flying Tigers in the China-Burma-India Theater.
Alison was called into theater by the previous commander of the AVG, Brigadier General Claire Lee Chennault, who was currently serving as Commander of the Fourteenth Air Force.[2] On 30 July 1942, Alison was credited with the first night kills in the theater. For his experimental night interception, he was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross.[6] In early 1943, Alison demonstrated his aggressiveness when he took off during an attack on his own airfield. Alison engaged three Mitsubishi A6M Zeros and scored one probable kill. He then vectored arriving reinforcements to the battle, after which he made a stern attack on another enemy fighter at close range, shooting it down. His gallantry and fighting spirit earned him the Silver Star.[2] Ending his tour as commander of the 75th Fighter Squadron, Alison left as an ace with seven confirmed victories and several probable kills.[2] His former commanding officer, David Lee “Tex” Hill, had high praise for Alison:

Air Commando

After returning home in May 1943, Alison was recalled to the CBI theater by Gen. Henry “Hap” Arnold to co-command (along with Lt. Col. Philip G. Cochran) the newly formed 1st Air Commando Group, also known as Project 9. As leader of this secret and highly innovative flying unit, Alison led a composite wing of fighters, bombers, transports, gliders, and helicopters in the dramatic “aerial invasion of Burma,” dubbed Operation THURSDAY. The 1st Air Commandos supported the British “Chindit” Special Forces’ infiltration of Japanese rear supply areas. In March 1944, Alison’s men flew more than 200 miles behind enemy lines, transporting, re-supplying, and providing fire support for over 9,000 Allied forces. Alison’s innovative leadership and combat daring as co-commander of the 1st Air Commandos helped to turn the tide of the Allied war effort in the CBI theater.

Alison later commanded the 3rd Air Commando group in the Pacific serving in the Philippines and Okinawa.[3]

Later years

After the war, he served as an Assistant Secretary of Commerce, President of the Air Force Association, and as a major general in the Air Force Reserve.[2] He retired as vice president of the Northrop Corporation in 1984 and is a 1994 inductee into the Air Commando Hall of Fame.[8] In 1985, 2004 and 2009 Alison was honored at the Air University’s Gathering of Eagles program.[2] In 2005, he was enshrined in the National Aviation Hall of Fame.[9]

 

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Stefan Kuryłowicz Polish architect, died from a plane crash he was , 62,

Stefan Marian Kuryłowicz was a Polish architect and professor who is widely credited with transforming the architecture and skyline of Warsaw, Poland, in the twenty years following the collapse of Communism in 1989 died from a plane crash he was , 62, Media reports have called Kuryłowicz “one of the most influential Polish architects.” He and the late architect Jacek Syropolski created the architectural firm, Kurylowicz & Associates.
.
(March 26, 1949 – June 6, 2011)

Kuryłowicz was born in Warsaw in 1949.[1] He earned a degree in architecture from the Warsaw University of Technology in 1972.[1] He opened an architectural studio in 1983 during an era when the Communist-ruled government of the People’s Republic of Poland openly discouraged free expression and creativity.[1]
The end of Communist rule in Poland in 1989 left Warsaw and other cities with littered wuth unimaginative, Communist-era buildings and other structures.[1] Kuryłowicz and his associate architects began designing and constructing a series of new, modern building throughout Warsaw over the next two decades, largely transforming parts of the Warsaw,[1] as well as other cities, such as Gdańsk. His style of modern architecture initially attracted some criticism, but Kurylowicz’s critics faded as his buildings were constructed.[1] Kurylowicz’s projects included commercial, industrial and residential buildings. His work has been credited with modernizing Warsaw during the post-Communist era. Jerzy Grochulski, the president of the Association of Polish Architects, said of Kurylowicz, “He helped shape the way Warsaw looks today.”[1] Kuryłowicz’s firm is currently constructing a municipal studio in Białystok and the Wolf Bracka department store.[2]
In addition to his architectural practice, Kuryłowicz taught architecture at Warsaw University of Technology and served as the deputy leader of the Association of Polish Architects.[1] He was also picked as one of the international architects chosen to oversee renovations on the United Nations Headquarters in New York City.[1]
Stefan Kuryłowicz died in a small plane crash in Asturias, northern Spain, on June 6, 2011, at the age of 62.[1] Kuryłowicz was flying in a convoy of three small planes enroute from San Sebastián, Spain, to the Portuguese town of Vilar de Luz, near Porto, when the accident occurred.[1] The planes encountered inclement weather, including rain and foggy, during the flight.[1] One plane crashed into a parking lot at an airport in Asturias, while the second plane crashed into a hill near the same airport.[1][3] Kurylowicz, his associate architect Jacek Syropolski, and two other people were killed in the accident.[1] The third airplane, carrying two people, landed safely at airport in Santander, Cantabria.[1]
Kuryłowicz was survived by his wife, Ewa Kuryłowicz, a board member of his architectural firm, and two sons.[1]

 

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Leon Botha, South African artist and musical performer, died from progeria-related heart failure he was , 26.

Leon was a South African painter, and musical performer, as well as one of the world’s oldest survivors of progeria  died from progeria-related heart failure he was , 26..

Botha (4 June 1985 – 5 June 2011)

Biography

Botha was born in Cape Town, South Africa and lived there until his death. He was diagnosed with progeria around the age of 4 years. He had no formal training in art beyond high school courses, but became a full-time painter after graduation, doing commissioned works.
In 2005, Botha successfully underwent heart bypass surgery to prevent a heart attack due to progeria-related atherosclerosis.[4] In January 2007, Botha had his first solo art exhibition, entitled “Liquid Sword; I am HipHop”, revolving around hip-hop culture as a way of life.[5] It took place at the Rust-en-Vrede gallery in Durbanville and was opened by Mr Fat of the South African Hip Hop group Brasse Vannie Kaap.[6][7] His second solo exhibition opened in March 2009 and featured pieces of the artist’s life. Botha was asked if the title “Liquid Swords; Slices of Lemon” referred to the adage “If life gives you lemons, make lemonade.” Botha said no, adding, “Lemons? I slice ‘em and serve ‘em back!”[8]
In January 2010 he hosted the first exhibit of “Who Am I? …Transgressions”, a photo collaboration with Gordon Clark, at the João Ferreira Gallery in Cape Town.[9] Botha said of the exhibition, “I am a spiritual being, the same as you, primarily. Then I’m a human being and this part of the human being is the body, which has a condition.”[10]
Botha was also engaged in deejaying and turntablism under the name DJ Solarize.[11][12] He was featured alongside Watkin Tudor Jones, aka Ninja, in the music video “Enter the Ninja” from Die Antwoord.[13][14][15][16]
In November 2010, Botha suffered a stroke.[17][18] Botha died from complications of progeria in Cape Town one day after his 26th birthday.[19][20]

 

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Dimi Mint Abba, Mauritanian singer, died from a brain haemorrhage he was , 52.

Dimi Mint Abba  was Mauritania‘s most famous musician. She was born Loula Bint Siddaty Ould Abba in 1958 into a low-caste (“iggawin”) family specializing in the griot tradition.

(25 December 1958 – 4 June 2011)

Life and career

Dimi’s parents were both musicians (her father had been asked to compose the Mauritanian national anthem), and she began playing at an early age. Her professional career began in 1976, when she sang on the radio and then competed, the following year, in the Umm Kulthum Contest in Tunis. Her winning song “Sawt Elfan” (“Art’s Plume”) has the refrain “Art’s Plume is a balsam, a weapon and a guide enlightening the spirit of men”, which can be interpreted to mean that artists play a more important role than warriors in society.

Her first international release was on the World Circuit record label, following a recommendation from Ali Farka Touré. On this album, she was accompanied by her husband Khalifa Ould Eide and her two daughters.
Later she composed famous and popular Mauritanian songs like “Hailala” and “Koumba bay bay”. She died in June, 2011, in Casablanca, Morocco following a stage accident in Aioun ten days earlier when she was singing for Sahrawi public. Her death invoked a political embarrassment to the government of Mauritania who did not show any sign of sympathy towards the death of the popular musician.

Discography

  • Khalifa Ould Eide & Dimi Mint Abba, Moorish Music from Mauritania. World Circuit WCD 019, 1990.
  • Dimi Mint Abba, Music and Songs of Mauritania, Auvidis Ethnic 1992.

 

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Lilian Jackson Braun, American author (Cat Who series), died from natural causes he was , 97.

Lilian Jackson Braun was an American writer, well-known for her light-hearted series of “The Cat Who…mystery novels. The “Cat Who” books center around the life of former newspaper reporter, James Qwilleran, and his two Siamese cats, KoKo and Yum Yum, in the fictitious small town of Pickax located in Moose County “400 miles north of everywhere died from natural causes he was , 97..” Although never formally stated in her books, the towns, counties and lifestyles described in the series are generally accepted to be modeled after Bad Axe, Michigan, where Braun resided with her husband until the mid-1980s.

(June 20, 1913 – June 4, 2011)

Life and career

Lilian Jackson Braun began her writing career as a teenager, contributing sports poetry for the Detroit News. She went on to write advertising copy for many of Detroit‘s department stores. For the Detroit Free Press she worked as the “Good Living” editor for 30 years, retiring from that post in 1978.
Between 1966 and 1968, she published three novels to critical acclaim: The Cat Who Could Read Backwards, The Cat Who Ate Danish Modern and The Cat Who Turned On and Off. In 1966, the New York Times labeled Braun, “the new detective of the year.” The rising mystery writer then disappeared from the publishing scene for 18 years. In 1986, the Berkley Publishing Group reintroduced her work to a new generation of fans with the publication of an original paperback, The Cat Who Saw Red. Within two years, Berkley released four new novels in paperback and reprinted her first three from the sixties. Braun’s series again rose to the top of best seller lists. The twenty-ninth novel in her series, The Cat Who Had 60 Whiskers was released in hardcover by the Penguin Group in January 2007.
Little was known about Braun, who was protective of her private life. Publishers long gave an incorrect year for her birth date, which remained unknown until she finally gave her true age during a 2005 interview with the Detroit News.
Like many writers of her generation, Braun, an admitted technophobe, continued to create her fiction on a typewriter. She resided in Tryon, North Carolina, with her husband, Earl Bettinger, and their two cats. Each of her books is dedicated to “Earl Bettinger the husband who…” Braun passed away at the Hospice House of the Carolina Foothills, in Landrum, South Carolina from a lung infection.[2]

“The Cat Who…” novels

  1. The Cat Who Could Read Backwards (1966)
  2. The Cat Who Ate Danish Modern (1967)
  3. The Cat Who Turned On and Off (1968)
  4. The Cat Who Saw Red (1986)
  5. The Cat Who Played Brahms (1987)
  6. The Cat Who Played Post Office (1987)
  7. The Cat Who Knew Shakespeare (1988)
  8. The Cat Who Sniffed Glue (1988)
  9. The Cat Who Went Underground (1989)
  10. The Cat Who Talked to Ghosts (1990)
  11. The Cat Who Lived High (1990)
  12. The Cat Who Knew a Cardinal (1991)
  13. The Cat Who Moved a Mountain (1992)
  14. The Cat Who Wasn’t There (1992)
  15. The Cat Who Went into the Closet (1993)
  16. The Cat Who Came to Breakfast (1994)
  17. The Cat Who Blew the Whistle (1995)
  18. The Cat Who Said Cheese (1996)
  19. The Cat Who Tailed a Thief (1997)
  20. The Cat Who Sang for the Birds (1999)
  21. The Cat Who Saw Stars (copyright, 1998; published, 1999)
  22. The Cat Who Robbed a Bank (2000)
  23. The Cat Who Smelled a Rat (2001)
  24. The Cat Who Went up the Creek (2002)
  25. The Cat Who Brought Down the House (2003)
  26. The Cat Who Talked Turkey (2004)
  27. The Cat Who Went Bananas (2005)
  28. The Cat Who Dropped a Bombshell (2006)
  29. The Cat Who Had 60 Whiskers (2007)
  30. The Cat Who Smelled Smoke (cancelled by publisher, Putnam)[3]

Short stories

  1. The Cat Who Had 14 Tales (1988)
  2. The Private Life of the Cat Who… (2003)
  3. Short and Tall Tales (2003)

 

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Claudio Bravo, Chilean painter, died from epilepsy he was , 74.

Claudio Bravo was a Chilean hyperrealist painter. He has lived and worked in Tangier, Morocco since 1972 died from epilepsy he was , 74.

(November 8, 1936 – June 4, 2011)

Bravo was born in Valparaíso, Chile. In 1945, he joined the Colegio San Ignacio in Santiago, Chile and studied art in the studio of Miguel Venegas Cienfuentes in Santiago. In 1954, he had his first exhibition at “Salón 13″ in Santiago at the age of 17. In 1955, he danced professionally with the Compañía de Ballet de Chile and worked for Teatro de Ensayo of the Universidad Católica de Chile.
Later, Bravo established himself in Madrid in the 1960s as a society portraitist, gaining recognition for his astounding ability to create verisimilitude. His ability to depict complex objects and shapes is reminiscent of Velázquez.
In 1968, Bravo received an invitation from President Marcos of the Philippines to come and paint him and his wife, Imelda Marcos as well as members of the high society.
In 1970, Bravo had his first exhibition at the Staempfli Gallery in New York which received rave reviews from renowned New York Times art critic John Canaday. Years later, when Bravo’s work reflected the hippie movement, Canaday would refer to Bravo’s work as “cheap and vulgar”.
Bravo moved to Tangier in 1972 where he purchased a 19th century three story mansion. He had many of the walls removed and the remaining walls were painted white to encourage the Mediterranean light so present in his paintings.
Bravo has painted many prominent figures in society including dictator Franco of Spain, President Ferdinand Marcos and First Lady Imelda Marcos of the Philippines and Malcolm Forbes.
Works by Bravo are included in the collections of El Museo del Barrio, New York, the Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, Maryland; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York; Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Santiago, Chile; Museo Rufino Tamayo, Mexico City, Mexico; Museum Boymans-van Beuningen, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Museum of Modern Art, New York, New York; Museum Ludwig, Cologne, Germany; The Palmer Museum of Art, State College, Pennsylvania; and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
The artist passed away at his home in Taroudant, Morocco, on June 4, 2011, due to an epilepsy attack.

 

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