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Ray Anderson, American entrepreneur, died from cancer he was , 77.

Ray C. Anderson was founder and chairman of Interface Inc., one of the world’s largest manufacturers
of modular carpet for commercial and residential applications and a
leading producer of commercial broadloom and commercial fabrics  died from cancer he was , 77.. He was
“known in environmental circles for his advanced and progressive stance on industrial ecology and sustainability.”1Anderson died on August 8, 2011 after a 20-month battle with cancer.

(July 28, 1934 – August 8, 2011)

Life and career

Anderson was an honors graduate of the Georgia Institute of Technology in the school of industrial and systems engineering in 1956.[4] He learned the carpet trade through more than 14 years at various positions at Deering, Milliken &Company and Callaway Mills.
Anderson founded Interface in 1973 to produce the first free-lay carpet tiles in America.[5]
Interface is one of the world’s largest producers of modular commercial
floorcoverings, with sales in 110 countries and manufacturing
facilities on four continents.[6]

Environmental focus

Anderson first turned his focus toward the environment in 1994 when he read The Ecology of Commerce by Paul Hawken,[7] seeking inspiration for a speech to an internal task force on the company’s environmental vision. Hawken argues that the industrial system is destroying the planet and only industry leaders are powerful enough to stop it.
In 2009, Anderson estimated that Interface was more than half-way towards the vision of “Mission Zero,”[8]
the company’s promise to eliminate any negative impact it may have on
the environment by the year 2020 through the redesign of processes and
products, the pioneering of new technologies, and efforts to reduce or
eliminate waste and harmful emissions while increasing the use of
renewable materials and sources of energy.[9][10]
Anderson chronicled the Mission Zero journey in two books, Mid-Course Correction: Toward a Sustainable Enterprise: The Interface Model (1998) and Confessions of a Radical Industrialist: Profits, People, Purpose: Doing Business by Respecting the Earth (2009).[11][12] The latter was released in paperback as Business Lessons from a Radical Industrialist in 2011.

Recognition and awards

Anderson was featured several documentaries and films, such as The Corporation, (2004 Canadian documentary); The 11th Hour (2007 Leonardo DiCaprio film); I Am (2011 Tom Shadyac documentary); Big Ideas for a Small Planet (Sundance Channel series) and others.
The Interface story is the focus of the documentary film “So Right, So Smart” (2009).[13]
Ray served a stint as co-chair of the President’s Council on
Sustainable Development during President Clinton’s administration, which
led to him co-chairing the Presidential Climate Action Plan in 2008, a
team that presented the Obama Administration with a 100 day action plan
on climate.[14]
Together, he and Interface funded the creation of the
Anderson-Interface Chair in Natural Systems at Georgia Tech, where
Associate Professor Valerie Thomas conducts research in sustainability.[15]
Ray Anderson received a host of accolades throughout his life, including:

  • In 2007, he was named one of Time’s Heroes of the Environment.[16]
  • Inaugural Millennium Award from Global Green, presented by Mikhail Gorbachev (1996)[17]
  • Recognized by Forbes Magazine and Ernst & Ernst, which named him Entrepreneur of the Year in 1996.[18]
  • The American Society of Interior Designers Design for Humanity Award (2010)[19]
  • Lifetime Achievement Award from GreenLaw (2010)[20]
  • The inaugural Global Sustainability Prize from the University of Kentucky Tracy Farmer Institute for Sustainability and the Environment (2010)[21]
  • River Guardian Award from the Upper Chattahoochee Riverkeeper (2010)[22]
  • Sustainability Award from the Women’s Network for a Sustainable
    Future (WNSF), the first time the WNSF has honored a businessman (2010)[23]
  • Pillars of EARTH Sustainable Leadership Awards given by EARTH University in Costa Rica (2010)[24]
  • Purpose Prize from Civic Ventures (2007)[25]
  • Auburn University’s International Quality of Life Award (2007)[26]
  • George and Cynthia Mitchell International Prize for Sustainable Development (2001)[27]

Under Anderson’s leadership, Interface was named to CRO magazine’s
(formerly Business Ethics magazine) 100 Best Corporate Citizens List for
three years.[28] In 2006, Sustainablebusiness.com named Interface to their SB20 list of Companies Changing the World,[29] and in 2006 GlobeScan listed Interface #1 in the world for corporate sustainability.[30]
Anderson was former Board Chair for The Georgia Conservancy and
served on the boards of the Ida Cason Callaway Foundation, Rocky
Mountain Institute, the David Suzuki Foundation, Emory University Board
of Ethics Advisory Council, the ASID Foundation, Worldwatch Institute,
and the Arizona State University Global Institute of Sustainability
Advisory Board. He was on the Advisory Boards of the Harvard Medical
School Center for Health and the Global Environment and the Upper
Chattahoochee Riverkeeper.[31]
He was awarded 12 honorary doctorates from Northland College (public
service), LaGrange College (business), N.C. State University (humane
letters), University of Southern Maine (humane letters), The University
of the South (civil law), and Colby College (law), Kendall College
(art), Emory University (science), Central College in Pella, Iowa,
(humane letters), Chapman University (humane letters), Clarkson
University (science), and the Georgia Institute of Technology
(philosophy).[32]

 

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Leo Kahn, American entrepreneur, co-founder of Staples, died from complications from a series of strokes he was , 94.

Leo Kahn was an American businessman and entrepreneur who is credited as the co-founder of Staples Inc. died from complications from a series of strokes he was , 94. Kahn is also considered a pioneer of the natural and health food supermarket industry, founding the Fresh Fields and Nature’s Heartland chains, which are now part of Whole Foods Market.

(December 31, 1916 – May 11, 2011)

Biography

 Early life

Kahn was born in Medford, Massachusetts, as the youngest of two brothers.[1] His parents, who were immigrants from Lithuania, owned a wholesale food distributor.[1] Kahn graduated from Malden High School in Malden, Massachusetts.[1]
Kahn received a bachelor’s degree from Harvard University in 1938.[1] He then obtained a master’s degree in journalism from Columbia University in New York City in 1939.[1] He worked a reporter in New Bedford, Massachusetts,[2] and practiced public relations for political campaigns until he was drafted into the U.S. military in 1941 as the U.S. entered World War II.[1] He was stationed in North Africa, Europe and Asia as a navigator for the Army Air Forces.[1]
He and his brother, Albert Kahn, took over the family’s wholesale business following the end of World War II.[1] Leo Kahn became the sole owner of the business when Albert left the company to become a professor at Boston College.[1]
Kahn married his first wife, Dorothy Davids, in 1963 and had three children.[1] The family resided in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, until Dorothy Kahn’s death in 1975.[1]

 Purity Supreme

Leo Kahn continued to operate his family’s wholesale food distributor. However, he also launched a new grocery retailing division, which became known as Purity Supreme.[3] The company initially opened small groceries, but then expanded to supermarkets.[3] The Purity Supreme company also included the Heartland Foods Warehouse, which was called “the first successful deep-discount warehouse supermarket in the country” by Inc Magazine.[3]
One Kahn’s biggest rivals was Thomas G. Stemberg, the owner of a competing New England supermarket chain called First National Supermarkets. At one point, Kahn and Stemberg engaged in a price war over the lower price for Thanksgiving turkeys.[3]
Kahn sold Purity Supreme to the Supermarket General Corporation in 1984 for $80 million.[3] Through the transaction, Kahn became the chairman of Supermarket General.[3] Privately, Kahn regretted selling Purity, saying he missed the interaction with his employees.[1]
Leo Kahn died at the Springhouse care facility in the Jamaica Plain neighborhood of Boston from a series of strokes on May 11, 2011, at the age of 94.[1]

 

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Cyrus Harvey, Jr., American entrepreneur, died from a stroke he was , 85.

Cyrus “Cy” Isadore Harvey, Jr.  was an American film distributor, the co-founder of Janus Films, and part-owner of the Brattle Theatre with his longtime business partner Bryant Haliday  died from a stroke he was , 85.. Born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, he was the son of Jewish immigrants. He helped introduce American viewers to foreign art movies from many countries including Japan, Italy, France, Spain and Sweden.

(October 14, 1925 – April 14, 2011)

Life and activities

At the end of World War II, Harvey served as a navigator in the United States Air Forces, though he did not serve overseas. After the war he graduated from Harvard University, where studied history and literature. After graduation, he went to Paris. In addition to his film interests, he founded the company Crabtree & Evelyn a retailer of body and home products.

Death

Cyrus Harvey, Jr. died on April 14, 2011, of a stroke suffered four days earlier. He is survived by his second wife, a sister, three daughters, and five grandchildren.

 

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Milton Levine, American entrepreneur, inventor of Uncle Milton’s Ant Farm died he was , 97..

Milton Martin Levine was an American entrepreneur who was the co-founder of Uncle Milton Toys died he was  , 97..

(November 3, 1913 – January 16, 2011) 

Biography

He was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on November 3, 1913, to Harry and Mary Levine. As a young boy, Milton collected ants in a jar at his uncle’s farm in Pennsylvania. During World War II, he served in the European Theatre where his engineer unit built bridges in France and Germany.[1] While in France, he met his future wife Mauricette Schneider, a citizen of the country, and they married in 1945. With his wife, he fathered one son and two daughters, which he eventually put through college with the proceeds from his business.[2][3]
After the war he formed a partnership with his brother-in-law E. Joseph Cossman and decided to enter the then new world of plastic and the toy industry that was predicted as a growth industry. The duo made arrangements with the National Organ Supply Company, or NOSCO who manufactured the plastic prizes in Cracker Jack to make flat toy soldiers for mail order that they advertised originally as “100 Toy Soldiers for $1” (later $1.25) that was advertised in nearly every American comic book of the time.[4]
Levine and Cossman also successfully mass marketed the potato gun,[5] toy shrunken heads[6] to hang from car rear view mirrors and balloon animals.[7]
In 1956 while at a Fourth of July picnic at his sister’s pool, he spotted a mound of ants. This inspired him to eventually found a company, Uncle Milton’s Toys, which is best known for its division, Uncle Milton’s Ant Farm. After recalling his collection of ants as a kid, he said, “We should make an antarium.” The original ant farms were sold for $1.29 and were contained in a six by nine-inch ant farm. Business boomed after advertisements on after school programs prompted thousands of shipments a week. After the child bought the ant farm, they had to send out a request for a shipment of 25 ants, which would arrive in a vial a few weeks later. The ants contained in the farm are the species Pogonomyrmex californicus, an ant native to the southwestern United States. At the time of his death, over 20 million units were sold, with a growth rate of 30,000 a month. He once said about the success of his business in 1991: “Most novelties, if they last one season, it’s a lot. If they last two seasons, it’s a phenomenon. To last 35 years is unheard of.”[2][3]
Levine died of natural causes on January 16, 2011, in Thousand Oaks, California, at the age of 97.[2]

Books

  • Uncle Milton’s Ant Facts and Fantasies (1970)
  • How I Made $1,000,000 in Mail Order-and You Can Too! (1993)

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Milton Levine , American entrepreneur, inventor of Uncle Milton’s Ant Farm died he was , 97.

Milton Martin Levine was an American entrepreneur who was the co-founder of Uncle Milton Toys died he was , 97

(November 3, 1913 – January 16, 2011)

Biography

He was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on November 3, 1913, to Harry and Mary Levine. As a young boy, Milton collected ants in a jar at his uncle’s farm in Pennsylvania. During World War II, he served in the European Theatre where his engineer unit built bridges in France and Germany.[1] While in France, he met his future wife Mauricette Schneider, a citizen of the country, and they married in 1945. With his wife, he fathered one son and two daughters, which he eventually put through college with the proceeds from his business.[2][3]
After the war he formed a partnership with his brother-in-law E. Joseph Cossman and decided to enter the then new world of plastic and the toy industry that was predicted as a growth industry. The duo made arrangements with the National Organ Supply Company, or NOSCO who manufactured the plastic prizes in Cracker Jack to make flat toy soldiers for mail order that they advertised originally as “100 Toy Soldiers for $1” (later $1.25) that was advertised in nearly every American comic book of the time.[4]
Levine and Cossman also successfully mass marketed the potato gun,[5] toy shrunken heads[6] to hang from car rear view mirrors and balloon animals.[7]
In 1956 while at a Fourth of July picnic at his sister’s pool, he spotted a mound of ants. This inspired him to eventually found a company, Uncle Milton’s Toys, which is best known for its division, Uncle Milton’s Ant Farm. After recalling his collection of ants as a kid, he said, “We should make an antarium.” The original ant farms were sold for $1.29 and were contained in a six by nine-inch ant farm. Business boomed after advertisements on after school programs prompted thousands of shipments a week. After the child bought the ant farm, they had to send out a request for a shipment of 25 ants, which would arrive in a vial a few weeks later. The ants contained in the farm are the species Pogonomyrmex californicus, an ant native to the southwestern United States. At the time of his death, over 20 million units were sold, with a growth rate of 30,000 a month. He once said about the success of his business in 1991: “Most novelties, if they last one season, it’s a lot. If they last two seasons, it’s a phenomenon. To last 35 years is unheard of.”[2][3]
Levine died of natural causes on January 16, 2011, in Thousand Oaks, California, at the age of 97.[2]

Books

  • Uncle Milton’s Ant Facts and Fantasies (1970)
  • How I Made $1,000,000 in Mail Order-and You Can Too! (1993)

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John D. Goeken, American entrepreneur, founder of MCI Communications, died from cancer.he was , 80

John D. “Jack” Goeken [1] was a prolific telecommunications entrepreneur died from cancer.he was , 80. He was the original founder of Microwave Communications Inc., better known as MCI Inc.[2]

(August 22, 1930 – September 16, 2010)

Founding of MCI

According to various press reports and the book “On the Line” by Larry Kahaner, Jack Goeken founded MCI in the 1960s so that he could expand his radio-repair business. He reasoned that if he could set up a microwave repeater system between Chicago and St. Louis, he would be able to sell more radios to truckers. When Goeken tried to apply for a license to establish his repeater system, he learned that AT&T had a monopoly on such communications, and that he would be denied a license.[2] Goeken, being a tenacious entrepreneur, challenged against what he believed to be an injustice using the court system.[3] Eventually, the lawsuit he filed would lead to the breakup of AT&T and usher in an era of competition for the telecommunications industry.

Other companies

MCI made Mr. Goeken a multimillionaire, and he used his personality and wealth to found many other innovative companies, including the FTD Mercury Network (flower delivery), Airfone (later sold to GTE),[2] In-Flight Phone Corp., and many others. The Goeken Group Corporation[1] is Mr. Goeken’s vehicle for managing his business ventures.
After selling Airfone Corp. to GTE Corp., Goeken alleged that GTE breached their contract by not allowing him to run the company as he saw fit, and he asked a court to void his non-compete agreement. A court agreed, and Goeken then founded In-Flight Phone Corporation in Oakbrook, Illinois, with the intent of competing with GTE Airfone, which held a monopoly on air-to-ground telecommunications.[4] In 1990, the FCC approved Goeken’s plan to share the Airfone frequencies, and solicited applications for and subsequently issued licences to several companies to operate digital Terrestrial Aeronautical Public Correspondence (TAPC) services. In-Flight Phone Corp. was awarded one of these licenses, and Goeken was clear to compete with GTE Airfone.
In-Flight Phone Corporation attracted more than $200 million from investors, and Goeken set out to build the first nationwide digital air-to-ground telecommunications network, capable of delivering static-free telephone calls, internet service and information services, to airplane seats. The company successfully competed for service contracts with USAir and other airlines. In 1996, Goeken sold In-Flight Phone Corp. to MCI Corp.

Personal life

Mr. Goeken’s early days in founding MCI are recounted in the book On The Line, by Larry Kahaner.
Mr. Goeken’s personal biography is at [2]

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James E. Winner Jr, American entrepreneur, inventor of The Club, died from a car accident. he was ., 81

 James Earl “Jim” Winner, Jr. was an American entrepreneur and chairman of Winner International who created The Club, an anti-theft device that is attached and locked on to a car’s steering wheel, making it more difficult for car thieves to steal the car died from a car accident. he was ., 81. By 1994, sales of the device had reached 14 million units.[1]

(July 1929 – September 14, 2010)  .


Winner was born in July 1929 in Transfer, Pennsylvania, where he grew up on a dairy farm to a relatively poor family and attended a one-room schoolhouse, stating in an interview that when he would speak to a group he was “comfortable saying that no one in the room was raised poorer than me” when they were growing up. He served in the United States Army in South Korea and attended Shenango Valley Business College.[2] Winner worked variously selling chemicals, pianos and vacuum cleaners.[3]
The inspiration for the Club came after his Cadillac was stolen, and he remembered back to his time serving in the Army when the steering wheels of jeeps would be protected using chains. Charles Johnson. a mechanic who said he had worked on developing the product with Winner before the incident in which the Caddilac was stolen claimed that he had not been properly credited for the development of the device and that the two men had made a verbal agreement in 1985 under which they would split any profits from the sale of the Club.[4] Winner acknowledged that Johnson had been paid a fee to work on developing the device, but that the basic design, such as the pronged hooks that secure it to the steering wheel, were part of Winner’s original design.[2] A lawsuit that Johnson filed to pursue the claim was settled in 1993 for what was reported to be $10.5 million.[4]
Winner International was established in 1986 in Sharon, Pennsylvania to market the Club and other security and safety products.[3] While similar locking devices had been invented decades earlier, The Club’s success was credited to heavy television advertising featuring police officers talking about the Club with the slogan “If you can’t steer it, you can’t steal it” and distribution through major national retailers including Kmart, Sears and Wal-Mart.[5] Winner acknowledged that the Club could be defeated by breaking the lock or sawing through the steering wheel. While improvements were made to the device, the Club could not defeat determined thieves but Winner noted that it offered the benefit of encouraging car thieves to avoid cars equipped with the Club and to avoid the time and effort needed to bypass the device. By 1993, sales of the Club had reached 10 million units. Winner would say that he had a love for sales and that “If it weren’t the Club, it would have been something else”.[3] In addition to such brand extensions of the original product including the Boat Club, the Truck Club and the Bike Club, another followup product was the “Door Club”, a security device that debuted in the early 1990s for use in homes, which Winter forecast would outsell the car device as “there are more doors than cars”.[1][6]
Winner was active in the community in Sharon, where his company was based, assisting charitable organizations and promoting the area as a tourist destination.[3] The Winners were recognized with the 2010 Bill Knecht Tourism Award by the area tourism board for their efforts since the 1970s to bring visitors to Mercer County, Pennsylvania.[2] Remembering the financial difficulties that he had faced growing up, Winner supported the charity Shoe the Children that provided money to pay for shoes for needy children.[2]
A resident of Clark, Pennsylvania and Hollywood, Florida, Winner died at age 81 on September 14, 2010 after the Lexus SUV he was driving on Miola Road in Highland Township, Clarion County, Pennsylvania crossed the divider into oncoming traffic and crashed head on into a Chevy Blazer, killing Winner and both passengers in the other vehicle.[2][7][8] There was no immediate explanation from Pennsylvania State Police investigating the accident as to why Winner’s car crossed into the opposite lane. He was survived by his second wife, Donna, as well as by four children and grandchildren. He had divorced his first wife.[3] Winner and his wife also had a home in Cook Forest, Pennsylvania.[7]

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