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James Tyler, American lutenist. died after a short illness he was , 70

James Tyler  was an American lutenist, banjoist, guitarist, composer, musicologist and author, who featured on over 60 early music recordings died after a short illness he was , 70.[1][2][3]

(3 August 1940 – 23 November 2010)

He was born in Hartford, Connecticut and initially studied the Banjo (classic 5-string and Tenor) and Mandolin with Walter K. Bauer, then the Lute with Joseph Iadone – he also played the Cello. As a lutenist, he performed and recorded with New York Pro Musica, and also toured and recorded as a banjoist with “Max Morath and the Original Rag Quartet”. In 1969, his interest in early music took him to London where he married Joyce Geller. [1][2]
During the 1970s and 80s, he performed and recorded in London with Musica Reservata, the Consort of Musicke, the Julian Bream Consort and the Early Music Consort of London under David Munrow. He then founded his own ensemble, the “London Early Music Group” in 1977, which lasted until 1990. He composed music for BBC television productions of Shakespeare plays, and also made an appearance as a lutenist in the 1972 film, Mary Queen of Scots.[1][2]
In 1986, he became professor of Music and director of the master’s and doctoral degree programs in early music performance at the University of Southern California (USC), a post he held until retiring in 2006.[4] Apart from the instruments mentioned, he was considered expert on the Renaissance and Baroque guitars. As a musicologist he travelled around Europe and the USA researching and transcribing hundreds of early music works. He authored several books on early plucked instruments and their music (see bibliography), and wrote articles for various publications.[1][2]
James Tyler died on November 23, 2010, after a short illness, aged 70.

Bibliography

  • James Tyler. The Early Guitar: A History and a Handbook (Oxford University Press, 1980).
  • James Tyler & Paul Sparks. The Early Mandolin” (Oxford University Press, 1992).
  • James Tyler & Paul Sparks. The Guitar and Its Music: From the Renaissance to the Classical Era (Oxford University Press, 2007).
  • James Tyler. A Guide to Playing the Baroque Guitar (Indiana University Press, 2011).

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Jean Cione, American baseball player (Rockford Peaches) died she was , 82

 Jean S. Cione [Cy]  was a pitcher who played from 1945 through 1954 in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League. Listed at 5′ 8″, 143 lb., She batted and threw left-handed died  she was , 82.[1]

(June 23, 1928 – November 22, 2010)

AAGPBL rules of play

The All-American Girls Professional Baseball League was a circuit that began to operate in 1943. Since the only organized ball for women in the United States was softball, the league oficcials created a hybrid game which included both fast-pitch softball and baseball. Compared to softball, the crucial differences were that nine (not ten) players were used, and runners could lead off, slide and steal bases. In its twelve years of history the AAGPBL evolved through many stages. These differences varied from the beginning of the league, progressively extending the length of the base paths and pitching distance and decreasing the size of the ball until the final year of play in 1954. For the first five years the circuit used a fastpitch underhand motion, shifted to sidearm in 1947, and never really became baseball until overhand pitching began in 1948.[2]

Brief profile

Born in Rockford, Illinois, Jean Cione was a dominant lefty pitcher who enjoyed a prolific career over ten seasons in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League. Cione is regarded one of the few pitchers to make the successful transition from underhand to overhand through the many stages of the league, although she hurled on awful expansion teams that did not give her much run support. An All-Star, she posted a 76-65 record with a 2.33 earned run average in 169 career games and pitched three no-hitters. In addition, she was a member of a champion team and turned in an unassisted triple play. Interestingly, from 1909 through 2010 there have only been 15 unassisted triple plays in Major League Baseball history. After the league folded in 1954, Cione taught sports medicine and physical education at the university level for 29 years, earning inductions into several halls of fame across the United States.[3][4][5]

Early years

Cione attended grades 1-12 in the Rockford Public School System, where she graduated in 1946. At school she used to play softball. In third grade she joined the boys’ softball team, and when she reached eighth grade became to play on the Rock River School Boy’s softball team, which competed with other league schools. In 1942, at age 14, she earned the first letter ever awarded to a girl by Rock River School. Cione later worked at J. L. Clarke, where she played on the company’s girls team. She also taught herself the accordion, after being motivated by the piano music of Frankie Carle.[3][6]
As she grew up, Cione showed an intense interest in athletics and outdoor activities, developing a practice that was to continue throughout the rest of his life. When she turned seventeen, she attended an All-American Girls Professional Baseball League tryout held at Racine under the direction of Max Carey. She passed the text and was offered a contract to play in the league.[3]

AAGPBL career

Cione entered the AAGPBL in 1945 with the Rockford Peaches, a team based in her hometown of Rockford which was managed by Bill Allington. Other five teams competed in the 110-game regular season: the Fort Wayne Daisies, the Grand Rapids Chicks, the Kenosha Comets, the Racine Belles, and the South Bend Blue Sox.[3][7]
The 1945 Peaches roster featured a perfect mix of experience and motivated young players, such as Mildred Deegan (2B), Dorothy Ferguson (3B), Rose Gacioch (P/OF), Dorothy Green (C), Dorothy Harrell (SS), Dorothy Kamenshek (1B), Josephine Lenard (OF), Olive Little (P), Carolyn Morris (P) and Margaret Wigiser (OF). Cione was used as a reserve first sacker for Kamenshek. Eventually, she pitched and played at outfield.[3][8]
Since the beginning, Cione showed her skills in the field and was alert and cooperative with her manager and teammates. During that first year with the Rockford Peaches, I sharpened those raw skills and learned the strategies of the game from a manager that I consider the best in the league, Bill Allington from Van Eyes CA. He was a student of the game, and held practice sessions for us rookies and bench warmers every day the team played at home. I attribute my 10-year longevity in the league to my first year under this outstanding manager, she proudly recalled in her autobiography.[3]
Rockford took the AAGPBL pennant with a 67-43 record, surpassing Fort Wayne (62-47), Grand Rapids (60-50), Racine (50-60), South Bend (49-60) and Kenosha (41-69). In the best-of-five Series playoffs, runnerup Fort Wayne defeated fourth-place Racine in four games; first-place Rockford eliminated third-place Grand Rapids in four games, and Rockford won the league championship by beating Fort Wayne in five games.[9]
The Muskegon Lassies and Peoria Redwings were added as expansion teams for the 1946 season. Cione was sent to the Redwings, as the AAGPBL shifted players as needed to help new teams stay afloat. In 1947 she returned to Rockford. It was clear she was back where she belonged.[7][10]
By April 1947, all of the league’s players were flown to Havana, Cuba for spring training. At the time, the Brooklyn Dodgers trained in the Cuban capital because Jackie Robinson, who would be the first Afro-American to play in the Major Leagues, was training with the Dodgers for the first time. By then, city ordinances in Vero Beach, Florida, where the Dodgers normally trained, prevented blacks and whites players from competing on the same field against each other. Notably, newspaper stories from Havana indicate that the All-American girls drew larger crowds for their exhibition games at Estadio Latinoamericano than did the Dodgers. That year, Cione responded winning 19 games for the Peaches while posting a stingy 1.30 ERA in her first full pitching season. Besides Cione, the roster of the Peaches included top notch veterans as Deegan, Ferguson, Gacioch, Green, Harrell and Kamenshek, as well as the newly arrived Lois Florreich (P) and Alice Pollitt (3B). Unfortunately, Rockford finished in sixth place with a 48-63 mark, out of contention. During the postseason, Grand Rapids defeated South Bend in five games while Racine ousted Muskegon in four games. In the final Series, Grand Rapids dispossed of Racine in seven games.[3][7][9][11]
The next year Cione then found herself on the move again, this time to Kenosha (1948–1951), and then the Battle Creek Belles (1952) and Muskegon (1953), before returning to Rockford in the league’s final year (1954). Her most productive season came in 1950, when she won 18 games and hurled a pair of no-hitters. In 1952 she went 2-5, but sported a 3.24 ERA and made the All-Star team.[3]
In between seasons, Cione graduated from high school and went on to study at Eastern Michigan University, University of Illinois and University of Michigan.[12]

Life after baseball

Following her baseball retirement, Cione received a bachelor’s degree from Eastern Michigan University before earning her master’s degree at the University of Illinois. From there, Cione took up teaching physical education in elementary school for a decade and then returned to EMU, where she taught sports medicine for nearly three decades. She was EMU’s first women’s athletic director as her alma mater established a women’s athletic program, attaining gender equity in the sports programs there.[12][13]

Honors and awards

Jean Cione is part of Women in Baseball, a permanent display based at the Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York. The exhibition was unveiled on November 5, 1988, to honor the entire All-American Girls Professional Baseball League rather than individual baseball personalities. She gained inductions into the Eastern Michigan University Athletic Hall of Fame (1986) and the National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame (2003), and also served as vice president of the AAGPBL Players Association while supervizing the organization’s website.[14][15][16]

A League of Their Own

The All-American Girls Professional Baseball League folded in 1954. Lady pitchers, catchers, and fielders drifted into obscurity until 1992 when the film A League of Their Own was released. The film kindled a renewed interest in these trailblazers who have their own places in American history. While the film does not use real names, filmmaker Penny Marshall seemed to be aiming for realism, as her work includes fake newsreel footage and pseudo-documentary present day scenes at the beginning and end of the fictitious story. Since then, Cione and her teammates have become the darlings of the media. They have been honored several times for their significant contributions, responding to request for autographs and corresponding with young athletes interested in hearing of their days in the AAGPBL.[17]
Jean Cione died at the age of 82 in Bozeman, Montana, where she had moved after retiring in 1992.[12]

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Len Lunde, Canadian ice hockey player, died from a heart condition.he was , 74

 Leonard Melvin Lunde was a professional ice hockey player who played 321 games in the National Hockey League and 72 games in the World Hockey Association died from a heart condition.he was , 74.  He played for the Chicago Black Hawks, Minnesota North Stars, Vancouver Canucks, Edmonton Oilers, and Detroit Red Wings.

(November 13, 1936 – November 22, 2010[1])

Lunde was born in Campbell River, British Colubmia, and played junior hockey with the Edmonton Oil Kings of the WCJHL. A prospect of the Detroit Red Wings, he moved up to the Edmonton Flyer of the Western Hockey League, where he scored 39 goals during the 1957-58 season. The following season he debuted in the National Hockey League, playing in 68 games for the Red Wings, and scoring 14 goals and 12 assists.[2]
He was a regular in the Red Wings’ lineup though the 1960-61 season, when Detroit reached the Stanley Cup finals, but after spending a majority of the 1961-62 season in the minors was traded to Chicago in June 1962. With the Black Hawks, he notched six goals and 22 assists playing playing on a checking line with Eric Nesterenko and Ron Murphy.[3]
Beginning in 1963-64, Lunde was chiefly a minor leaguer over the next few seasons. He did play a handful of games for the Hawks, Minnesota North Stars and Vancouver Canucks but saw most of his ice time as an offensive sparkplug in the American Hockey League, the Western Hockey League and the Central Hockey League.
His best year was 1964-65 when he scored 50 goals for the AHL’s Buffalo Bisons and was voted on to the league’s first all-star team.
His last full season was 1973-74 with the Edmonton Oilers of the World Hockey Association, where he scored 26 goals and added 22 assists for 48 points.[4]
He also played in Finland with Ilves in 1971–1972 and was head coach of the Finnish national team in World Championships 1973 in Moscow. Lunde had initially retired in 1972 before playing for Edmonton Oilers. Lunde re-retired in 1974, but made a one-game return in 1979, when he played for Mora IK.
Overall, Lunde scored 39 goals and 83 assists, and recorded 75 penalty minutes in 321 NHL games. He also scored three goals and two assists in 20 playoff games.
Lunde died on November 22, 2010, of a heart condition in Edmonton, Alberta.[1][5]

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Gallery

Wakanohana Kanji I, Japanese sumo wrestler, died from kidney cancer. he was , 82

Wakanohana Kanji I  was a sumo wrestler, the sport’s 45th Yokozuna (the highest-ranking position).
Wakanohana’s younger brother (by twenty-two years) was the late former ozeki Takanohana Kenshi and he was the uncle of Takanohana Koji and Wakanohana Masaru  died from kidney cancer. he was , 82. He won ten top division yusho or tournament championships during his career and at a fighting weight of around 100 kg was one of the lightest yokozuna ever. He had a long-standing rivalry with Tochinishiki and was one of the most popular wrestlers of the 1950s. After his retirement in 1962 he established Futagoyama stable and was also head of the Japan Sumo Association from 1988 until 1992.

(若乃花 幹士 Wakanohana Kanji?, March 16, 1928 – September 1, 2010)

Contents

Career

He was born in Aomori and moved to Hokkaidō as a child. After working as a stevedore, he was scouted by the maegashira Onoumi,[1] joining Nishonoseki stable in November 1946. He was trained harshly by Rikidōzan in Nishonoseki stable, but he reportedly bit Rikidōzan’s leg in retaliation for his training.[2] Onoumi became head coach of Shibatayama stable after his retirement in May 1952, and Wakanohana followed him to the new stable. It was renamed Hanakago stable in September 1953.
He reached the top division in 1950. During his career he was nicknamed the Dohyo no Oni, or Devil of the Dohyo due to his great fighting spirit and endurance. In September 1955 he fought a bout against yokozuna Chiyonoyama that lasted for over 17 minutes before being declared a draw.[1] (Most sumo matches are over in a few seconds). He was promoted to ozeki after that tournament. He won his first top division championship in May 1956. Shortly before the following tournament his four year old son was scalded to death when a boiling hot pot of chankonabe fell on him.[3] Despite being devastated by the tragedy,[4] Wakanohana chose to compete in the tournament but ended up dropping out with a fever.[3] He had to wait until January 1958 for promotion to yokozuna, which was confirmed shortly after he took his second tournament championship. He was the first yokozuna produced by the Nishonoseki ichimon or group of stables in over 20 years and consequently he had to borrow the kesho mawashi of the former Futabayama to perform his first dohyo-iri or yokozuna ring entering ceremony.[4]
Wakanohana’s great rival as yokozuna was Tochinishiki. They were very evenly matched, being of similar height and weight, and both ended up with ten top division titles each. In March 1960, they faced each other undefeated on the final day – the first time ever that two yokozuna had met like this.[3] Wakanohana won the match and Tochinishiki retired after the next tournament. Wakanohana kept going until the new era of yokozuna Taiho and Kashiwado, retiring in May 1962.
Wakanohana was such a popular wrestler that he even starred in a feature film 若ノ花物語 土俵の鬼 Wakanohana monogatari dohyou no oni about his life, made by the Nikkatsu movie studio and released across Japan December 27, 1956.[4][5]

Retirement from sumo

After retirement he set up his own training stable, Futagoyama, which produced a string of top wrestlers, including ozeki Takanohana (his brother) and Wakashimazu, and yokozuna Wakanohana II and Takanosato. He was also head of the Japan Sumo Association from 1988 to 1992. Among his reforms was an attempt to improve the quality of the tachi-ai or initial charge of a bout by fining wrestlers who engaged in matta, or false starts. At the end of his last tournament in charge he presented the Emperor’s Cup to his nephew, Takahanada. Upon his retirement from the Sumo Association in 1993, his stable merged with his brother’s Fujishima stable. He became director of the Sumo Museum. He died of kidney cancer in September 2010 at the age of 82. Umegatani I, who lived to 83, is the only yokozuna to live longer than him.[6]

Fighting style

Wakanohana was a noted technician, and his trademark was his overarm throwing techniques.[6] As well as uwatenage and dashinage he was also well known for yobimodashi, or pulling body slam, a kimarite that has virtually disappeared from professional sumo today. He was equally adept at both a hidari-yotsu (right hand outside, left hand inside) and migi-yotsu (the reverse) grip on his opponent’s mawashi.

Top division record

Note: The Osaka tournament resumed in 1953. The Kyushu tournament was first held in 1957, and the Nagoya tournament in 1958.

Wakanohana Kanji I[7]
year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
1950 West Maegashira #18
11–4
F
x East Maegashira #9
10–5
x East Maegashira #4
4–11
x
1951 East Maegashira #7
11–4
F
x East Maegashira #1
8–7
x East Komusubi
7–8
x
1952 West Komusubi
5–10
x West Maegashira #4
5–10
x West Maegashira #9
10–5
x
1953 West Maegashira #3
8–7
East Maegashira #1
8–7
East Maegashira #1
8–7
x West Komusubi
8–7
x
1954 West Sekiwake
8–7
O
East Sekiwake
9–6
East Sekiwake
9–6
x West Sekiwake
11–4
O
x
1955 East Sekiwake
7–7–1draw
West Sekiwake
10–4–1draw
West Sekiwake
8–7
x West Sekiwake
10–4–1draw
T
x
1956 East Ōzeki
13–2
East Ōzeki
12–3–P
East Ōzeki
12–3–P
x East Ōzeki
12–2–1
x
1957 East Ōzeki
11–4
East Ōzeki
10–5
East Ōzeki
11–4
x East Ōzeki
11–4
East Ōzeki
12–3
1958 East Ōzeki
13–2
East Yokozuna
12–3
West Yokozuna
11–4
East Yokozuna
13–2
East Yokozuna
14–1
East Yokozuna
12–2–1draw
1959 East Yokozuna
14–1
East Yokozuna
12–3
East Yokozuna
14–1–P
West Yokozuna
11–4
West Yokozuna
14–1
East Yokozuna
11–4
1960 West Yokozuna
0–3–12
East Yokozuna
15–0
East Yokozuna
13–2
East Yokozuna
13–2
East Yokozuna
13–2
East Yokozuna
5–4–6
1961 West Yokozuna
12–3
Sat out due to injury West Yokozuna
10–5
East Yokozuna
3–4–8
West Yokozuna
10–5
East Yokozuna
11–4
1962 East Yokozuna
11–4
West Yokozuna
0–2–13
East Yokozuna
Retired
0–0–15
x x x
Record given as win-loss-absent    Championship Retired Demoted from makuuchi

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